Speeches (Lines) for Lord Chamberlain
in "Henry VIII"

Total: 38

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,570

Is't possible the spells of France should juggle
Men into such strange mysteries?

2

I,3,575

As far as I see, all the good our English
Have got by the late voyage is but merely
A fit or two o' the face; but they are shrewd ones;
For when they hold 'em, you would swear directly
Their very noses had been counsellors
To Pepin or Clotharius, they keep state so.

3

I,3,584

Death! my lord,
Their clothes are after such a pagan cut too,
That, sure, they've worn out Christendom.
[Enter LOVELL]
How now!
What news, Sir Thomas Lovell?

4

I,3,593

What is't for?

5

I,3,596

I'm glad 'tis there: now I would pray our monsieurs
To think an English courtier may be wise,
And never see the Louvre.

6

I,3,614

What a loss our ladies
Will have of these trim vanities!

7

I,3,626

Well said, Lord Sands;
Your colt's tooth is not cast yet.

8

I,3,630

Sir Thomas,
Whither were you a-going?

9

I,3,634

O, 'tis true:
This night he makes a supper, and a great one,
To many lords and ladies; there will be
The beauty of this kingdom, I'll assure you.

10

I,3,641

No doubt he's noble;
He had a black mouth that said other of him.

11

I,3,647

True, they are so:
But few now give so great ones. My barge stays;
Your lordship shall along. Come, good Sir Thomas,
We shall be late else; which I would not be,
For I was spoke to, with Sir Henry Guildford
This night to be comptrollers.

12

I,4,669

You are young, Sir Harry Guildford.

13

I,4,681

Sweet ladies, will it please you sit? Sir Harry,
Place you that side; I'll take the charge of this:
His grace is entering. Nay, you must not freeze;
Two women placed together makes cold weather:
My Lord Sands, you are one will keep 'em waking;
Pray, sit between these ladies.

14

I,4,696

Well said, my lord.
So, now you're fairly seated. Gentlemen,
The penance lies on you, if these fair ladies
Pass away frowning.

15

I,4,727

Look out there, some of ye.

16

I,4,733

How now! what is't?

17

I,4,752

Because they speak no English, thus they pray'd
To tell your grace, that, having heard by fame
Of this so noble and so fair assembly
This night to meet here, they could do no less
Out of the great respect they bear to beauty,
But leave their flocks; and, under your fair conduct,
Crave leave to view these ladies and entreat
An hour of revels with 'em.

18

I,4,769

Your grace?

19

I,4,775

I will, my lord.

20

I,4,778

Such a one, they all confess,
There is indeed; which they would have your grace
Find out, and he will take it.

21

I,4,793

An't please your grace, Sir Thomas Bullen's daughter—
The Viscount Rochford,—one of her highness' women.

22

II,2,1017

'My lord, the horses your lordship sent for, with
all the care I had, I saw well chosen, ridden, and
furnished. They were young and handsome, and of the
best breed in the north. When they were ready to
set out for London, a man of my lord cardinal's, by
commission and main power, took 'em from me; with
this reason: His master would be served before a
subject, if not before the king; which stopped our
mouths, sir.'
I fear he will indeed: well, let him have them:
He will have all, I think.

23

II,2,1030

Good day to both your graces.

24

II,2,1032

I left him private,
Full of sad thoughts and troubles.

25

II,2,1035

It seems the marriage with his brother's wife
Has crept too near his conscience.

26

II,2,1058

Heaven keep me from such counsel! 'Tis most true
These news are every where; every tongue speaks 'em,
And every true heart weeps for't: all that dare
Look into these affairs see this main end,
The French king's sister. Heaven will one day open
The king's eyes, that so long have slept upon
This bold bad man.

27

II,2,1083

Excuse me;
The king has sent me otherwhere: besides,
You'll find a most unfit time to disturb him:
Health to your lordships.

28

II,3,1262

Good morrow, ladies. What were't worth to know
The secret of your conference?

29

II,3,1267

It was a gentle business, and becoming
The action of good women: there is hope
All will be well.

30

II,3,1271

You bear a gentle mind, and heavenly blessings
Follow such creatures. That you may, fair lady,
Perceive I speak sincerely, and high note's
Ta'en of your many virtues, the king's majesty
Commends his good opinion of you, and
Does purpose honour to you no less flowing
Than Marchioness of Pembroke: to which title
A thousand pound a year, annual support,
Out of his grace he adds.

31

II,3,1289

Lady,
I shall not fail to approve the fair conceit
The king hath of you.
[Aside]
I have perused her well;
Beauty and honour in her are so mingled
That they have caught the king: and who knows yet
But from this lady may proceed a gem
To lighten all this isle? I'll to the king,
And say I spoke with you.

32

III,2,1843

My lords, you speak your pleasures:
What he deserves of you and me I know;
What we can do to him, though now the time
Gives way to us, I much fear. If you cannot
Bar his access to the king, never attempt
Any thing on him; for he hath a witchcraft
Over the king in's tongue.

33

III,2,1876

The king in this perceives him, how he coasts
And hedges his own way. But in this point
All his tricks founder, and he brings his physic
After his patient's death: the king already
Hath married the fair lady.

34

III,2,1907

Now, God incense him,
And let him cry Ha! louder!

35

III,2,2234

O my lord,
Press not a falling man too far! 'tis virtue:
His faults lie open to the laws; let them,
Not you, correct him. My heart weeps to see him
So little of his great self.

36

V,3,3175

This is the king's ring.

37

V,4,3339

Mercy o' me, what a multitude are here!
They grow still too; from all parts they are coming,
As if we kept a fair here! Where are these porters,
These lazy knaves? Ye have made a fine hand, fellows:
There's a trim rabble let in: are all these
Your faithful friends o' the suburbs? We shall have
Great store of room, no doubt, left for the ladies,
When they pass back from the christening.

38

V,4,3352

As I live,
If the king blame me for't, I'll lay ye all
By the heels, and suddenly; and on your heads
Clap round fines for neglect: ye are lazy knaves;
And here ye lie baiting of bombards, when
Ye should do service. Hark! the trumpets sound;
They're come already from the christening:
Go, break among the press, and find a way out
To let the troop pass fairly; or I'll find
A Marshalsea shall hold ye play these two months.

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