Speeches (Lines) for Longaville
in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 40

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,26

I am resolved; 'tis but a three years' fast:
The mind shall banquet, though the body pine:
Fat paunches have lean pates, and dainty bits
Make rich the ribs, but bankrupt quite the wits.

2

I,1,55

You swore to that, Biron, and to the rest.

3

I,1,98

He weeds the corn and still lets grow the weeding.

4

I,1,125

Four days ago.

5

I,1,129

Marry, that did I.

6

I,1,131

To fright them hence with that dread penalty.

7

I,1,184

Costard the swain and he shall be our sport;
And so to study, three years is but short.

8

I,1,198

A high hope for a low heaven: God grant us patience!

9

I,1,200

To hear meekly, sir, and to laugh moderately; or to
forbear both.

10

II,1,690

I beseech you a word: what is she in the white?

11

II,1,692

Perchance light in the light. I desire her name.

12

II,1,694

Pray you, sir, whose daughter?

13

II,1,696

God's blessing on your beard!

14

II,1,699

Nay, my choler is ended.
She is a most sweet lady.

15

IV,3,1368

Ay me, I am forsworn!

16

IV,3,1372

Am I the first that have been perjured so?

17

IV,3,1376

I fear these stubborn lines lack power to move:
O sweet Maria, empress of my love!
These numbers will I tear, and write in prose.

18

IV,3,1381

This same shall go.
[Reads]
Did not the heavenly rhetoric of thine eye,
'Gainst whom the world cannot hold argument,
Persuade my heart to this false perjury?
Vows for thee broke deserve not punishment.
A woman I forswore; but I will prove,
Thou being a goddess, I forswore not thee:
My vow was earthly, thou a heavenly love;
Thy grace being gain'd cures all disgrace in me.
Vows are but breath, and breath a vapour is:
Then thou, fair sun, which on my earth dost shine,
Exhalest this vapour-vow; in thee it is:
If broken then, it is no fault of mine:
If by me broke, what fool is not so wise
To lose an oath to win a paradise?

19

IV,3,1400

By whom shall I send this?—Company! stay.

20

IV,3,1420

And I had mine!

21

IV,3,1456

[Advancing] Dumain, thy love is far from charity.
You may look pale, but I should blush, I know,
To be o'erheard and taken napping so.

22

IV,3,1541

It did move him to passion, and therefore let's hear it.

23

IV,3,1611

And since her time are colliers counted bright.

24

IV,3,1621

Look, here's thy love: my foot and her face see.

25

IV,3,1631

O, some authority how to proceed;
Some tricks, some quillets, how to cheat the devil.

26

IV,3,1715

Now to plain-dealing; lay these glozes by:
Shall we resolve to woo these girls of France?

27

V,2,2150

I know the reason, lady, why you ask.

28

V,2,2152

You have a double tongue within your mask,
And would afford my speechless vizard half.

29

V,2,2155

A calf, fair lady!

30

V,2,2157

Let's part the word.

31

V,2,2160

Look, how you butt yourself in these sharp mocks!
Will you give horns, chaste lady? do not so.

32

V,2,2163

One word in private with you, ere I die.

33

V,2,2555

The face of an old Roman coin, scarce seen.

34

V,2,2580

His leg is too big for Hector's.

35

V,2,2589

Stuck with cloves.

36

V,2,2598

That columbine.

37

V,2,2600

I must rather give it the rein, for it runs against Hector.

38

V,2,2726

So did our looks.

39

V,2,2775

What says Maria?

40

V,2,2778

I'll stay with patience; but the time is long.

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