Speeches (Lines) for Leontes
in "Winter's Tale"

Total: 125

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,59

Stay your thanks a while;
And pay them when you part.

2

I,2,67

We are tougher, brother,
Than you can put us to't.

3

I,2,70

One seven-night longer.

4

I,2,72

We'll part the time between's then; and in that
I'll no gainsaying.

5

I,2,83

Tongue-tied, our queen?
speak you.

6

I,2,91

Well said, Hermione.

7

I,2,155

Is he won yet?

8

I,2,157

At my request he would not.
Hermione, my dearest, thou never spokest...

9

I,2,161

Never, but once.

10

I,2,174

Why, that was when
Three crabbed months had sour'd themselves to death,...

11

I,2,183

[Aside]. Too hot, too hot!
To mingle friendship far is mingling bloods....

12

I,2,197

I' fecks!
Why, that's my bawcock. What, hast...

13

I,2,207

Thou want'st a rough pash and the shoots that I have,
To be full like me: yet they say we are...

14

I,2,232

No, in good earnest.
How sometimes nature will betray its folly,...

15

I,2,245

You will! why, happy man be's dole! My brother,
Are you so fond of your young prince as we...

16

I,2,255

So stands this squire
Officed with me: we two will walk, my lord,...

17

I,2,264

To your own bents dispose you: you'll be found,
Be you beneath the sky....

18

I,2,300

Why that's some comfort. What, Camillo there?

19

I,2,302

Go play, Mamillius; thou'rt an honest man.
[Exit MAMILLIUS]...

20

I,2,307

Didst note it?

21

I,2,310

Didst perceive it?
[Aside]...

22

I,2,317

At the queen's be't: 'good' should be pertinent
But, so it is, it is not. Was this taken...

23

I,2,327

Ha!

24

I,2,329

Ay, but why?

25

I,2,332

Satisfy!
The entreaties of your mistress! satisfy!...

26

I,2,342

To bide upon't, thou art not honest, or,
If thou inclinest that way, thou art a coward,...

27

I,2,369

Ha' not you seen, Camillo,—
But that's past doubt, you have, or your eye-glass...

28

I,2,387

Is whispering nothing?
Is leaning cheek to cheek? is meeting noses?...

29

I,2,403

Say it be, 'tis true.

30

I,2,405

It is; you lie, you lie:
I say thou liest, Camillo, and I hate thee,...

31

I,2,414

Why, he that wears her like a medal, hanging
About his neck, Bohemia: who, if I...

32

I,2,433

Make that thy question, and go rot!
Dost think I am so muddy, so unsettled,...

33

I,2,450

Thou dost advise me
Even so as I mine own course have set down:...

34

I,2,459

This is all:
Do't and thou hast the one half of my heart;...

35

I,2,463

I will seem friendly, as thou hast advised me.

36

II,1,641

Was he met there? his train? Camillo with him?

37

II,1,645

How blest am I
In my just censure, in my true opinion!...

38

II,1,667

I know't too well.
Give me the boy: I am glad you did not nurse him:...

39

II,1,672

Bear the boy hence; he shall not come about her;
Away with him! and let her sport herself...

40

II,1,679

You, my lords,
Look on her, mark her well; be but about...

41

II,1,698

You have mistook, my lady,
Polixenes for Leontes: O thou thing!...

42

II,1,719

No; if I mistake
In those foundations which I build upon,...

43

II,1,736

Shall I be heard?

44

II,1,746

Go, do our bidding; hence!

45

II,1,763

Hold your peaces.

46

II,1,777

Cease; no more.
You smell this business with a sense as cold...

47

II,1,786

What! lack I credit?

48

II,1,791

Why, what need we
Commune with you of this, but rather follow...

49

II,1,804

How could that be?
Either thou art most ignorant by age,...

50

II,1,821

Though I am satisfied and need no more
Than what I know, yet shall the oracle...

51

II,3,926

Nor night nor day no rest: it is but weakness
To bear the matter thus; mere weakness. If...

52

II,3,936

How does the boy?

53

II,3,939

To see his nobleness!
Conceiving the dishonour of his mother,...

54

II,3,973

What noise there, ho?

55

II,3,976

How!
Away with that audacious lady! Antigonus,...

56

II,3,983

What, canst not rule her?

57

II,3,998

Good queen!

58

II,3,1003

Force her hence.

59

II,3,1010

Out!
A mankind witch! Hence with her, out o' door:...

60

II,3,1018

Traitors!
Will you not push her out? Give her the bastard....

61

II,3,1027

He dreads his wife.

62

II,3,1030

A nest of traitors!

63

II,3,1042

A callat
Of boundless tongue, who late hath beat her husband...

64

II,3,1062

A gross hag
And, lozel, thou art worthy to be hang'd,...

65

II,3,1068

Once more, take her hence.

66

II,3,1071

I'll ha' thee burnt.

67

II,3,1080

On your allegiance,
Out of the chamber with her! Were I a tyrant,...

68

II,3,1092

Thou, traitor, hast set on thy wife to this.
My child? away with't! Even thou, that hast...

69

II,3,1109

You're liars all.

70

II,3,1117

I am a feather for each wind that blows:
Shall I live on to see this bastard kneel...

71

II,3,1133

It shall be possible. Swear by this sword
Thou wilt perform my bidding.

72

II,3,1136

Mark and perform it, see'st thou! for the fail
Of any point in't shall not only be...

73

II,3,1160

No, I'll not rear
Another's issue.

74

II,3,1170

Twenty-three days
They have been absent: 'tis good speed; foretells...

75

III,2,1211

This sessions, to our great grief we pronounce,
Even pushes 'gainst our heart: the party tried...

76

III,2,1223

Read the indictment.

77

III,2,1267

I ne'er heard yet
That any of these bolder vices wanted...

78

III,2,1273

You will not own it.

79

III,2,1292

You knew of his departure, as you know
What you have underta'en to do in's absence.

80

III,2,1298

Your actions are my dreams;
You had a bastard by Polixenes,...

81

III,2,1352

Break up the seals and read.

82

III,2,1360

Hast thou read truth?

83

III,2,1363

There is no truth at all i' the oracle:
The sessions shall proceed: this is mere falsehood.

84

III,2,1367

What is the business?

85

III,2,1371

How! gone!

86

III,2,1373

Apollo's angry; and the heavens themselves
Do strike at my injustice....

87

III,2,1379

Take her hence:
Her heart is but o'ercharged; she will recover:...

88

III,2,1452

Go on, go on
Thou canst not speak too much; I have deserved...

89

III,2,1473

Thou didst speak but well
When most the truth; which I receive much better...

90

V,1,2826

Whilst I remember
Her and her virtues, I cannot forget...

91

V,1,2838

I think so. Kill'd!
She I kill'd! I did so: but thou strikest me...

92

V,1,2878

Good Paulina,
Who hast the memory of Hermione,...

93

V,1,2886

Thou speak'st truth.
No more such wives; therefore, no wife: one worse,...

94

V,1,2894

She had; and would incense me
To murder her I married.

95

V,1,2902

Stars, stars,
And all eyes else dead coals! Fear thou no wife;...

96

V,1,2907

Never, Paulina; so be blest my spirit!

97

V,1,2921

My true Paulina,
We shall not marry till thou bid'st us.

98

V,1,2931

What with him? he comes not
Like to his father's greatness: his approach,...

99

V,1,2938

His princess, say you, with him?

100

V,1,2961

Go, Cleomenes;
Yourself, assisted with your honour'd friends,...

101

V,1,2970

Prithee, no more; cease; thou know'st
He dies to me again when talk'd of: sure,...

102

V,1,3001

O my brother,
Good gentleman! the wrongs I have done thee stir...

103

V,1,3013

Where the warlike Smalus,
That noble honour'd lord, is fear'd and loved?

104

V,1,3025

The blessed gods
Purge all infection from our air whilst you...

105

V,1,3045

Where's Bohemia? speak.

106

V,1,3059

Who? Camillo?

107

V,1,3069

You are married?

108

V,1,3073

My lord,
Is this the daughter of a king?

109

V,1,3077

That 'once' I see by your good father's speed
Will come on very slowly. I am sorry,...

110

V,1,3091

Would he do so, I'ld beg your precious mistress,
Which he counts but a trifle.

111

V,1,3097

I thought of her,
Even in these looks I made....

112

V,3,3287

O grave and good Paulina, the great comfort
That I have had of thee!

113

V,3,3296

O Paulina,
We honour you with trouble: but we came...

114

V,3,3315

Her natural posture!
Chide me, dear stone, that I may say indeed...

115

V,3,3326

As now she might have done,
So much to my good comfort, as it is...

116

V,3,3357

Do not draw the curtain.

117

V,3,3360

Let be, let be.
Would I were dead, but that, methinks, already—...

118

V,3,3367

The fixture of her eye has motion in't,
As we are mock'd with art.

119

V,3,3372

O sweet Paulina,
Make me to think so twenty years together!...

120

V,3,3378

Do, Paulina;
For this affliction has a taste as sweet...

121

V,3,3388

No, not these twenty years.

122

V,3,3398

What you can make her do,
I am content to look on: what to speak,...

123

V,3,3406

Proceed:
No foot shall stir.

124

V,3,3422

O, she's warm!
If this be magic, let it be an art...

125

V,3,3453

O, peace, Paulina!
Thou shouldst a husband take by my consent,...

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