Speeches (Lines) for Launce
in "Two Gentlemen of Verona"

Total: 68

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,3,593

Nay, 'twill be this hour ere I have done weeping;
all the kind of the Launces have this very fault. I...

2

II,3,631

It is no matter if the tied were lost; for it is the
unkindest tied that ever any man tied.

3

II,3,634

Why, he that's tied here, Crab, my dog.

4

II,3,640

For fear thou shouldst lose thy tongue.

5

II,3,642

In thy tale.

6

II,3,644

Lose the tide, and the voyage, and the master, and
the service, and the tied! Why, man, if the river...

7

II,3,649

Sir, call me what thou darest.

8

II,3,651

Well, I will go.

9

II,5,880

Forswear not thyself, sweet youth, for I am not
welcome. I reckon this always, that a man is never...

10

II,5,889

Marry, after they closed in earnest, they parted very
fairly in jest.

11

II,5,892

No.

12

II,5,894

No, neither.

13

II,5,896

No, they are both as whole as a fish.

14

II,5,898

Marry, thus: when it stands well with him, it
stands well with her.

15

II,5,901

What a block art thou, that thou canst not! My
staff understands me.

16

II,5,904

Ay, and what I do too: look thee, I'll but lean,
and my staff understands me.

17

II,5,907

Why, stand-under and under-stand is all one.

18

II,5,909

Ask my dog: if he say ay, it will! if he say no,
it will; if he shake his tail and say nothing, it will.

19

II,5,912

Thou shalt never get such a secret from me but by a parable.

20

II,5,915

I never knew him otherwise.

21

II,5,917

A notable lubber, as thou reportest him to be.

22

II,5,919

Why, fool, I meant not thee; I meant thy master.

23

II,5,921

Why, I tell thee, I care not though he burn himself
in love. If thou wilt, go with me to the alehouse;...

24

II,5,926

Because thou hast not so much charity in thee as to
go to the ale with a Christian. Wilt thou go?

25

III,1,1263

Soho, soho!

26

III,1,1265

Him we go to find: there's not a hair on's head
but 'tis a Valentine.

27

III,1,1273

Can nothing speak? Master, shall I strike?

28

III,1,1275

Nothing.

29

III,1,1277

Why, sir, I'll strike nothing: I pray you,—

30

III,1,1290

Sir, there is a proclamation that you are vanished.

31

III,1,1336

I am but a fool, look you; and yet I have the wit to
think my master is a kind of a knave: but that's...

32

III,1,1357

With my master's ship? why, it is at sea.

33

III,1,1360

The blackest news that ever thou heardest.

34

III,1,1362

Why, as black as ink.

35

III,1,1364

Fie on thee, jolt-head! thou canst not read.

36

III,1,1366

I will try thee. Tell me this: who begot thee?

37

III,1,1368

O illiterate loiterer! it was the son of thy
grandmother: this proves that thou canst not read.

38

III,1,1371

There; and St. Nicholas be thy speed!

39

III,1,1373

Ay, that she can.

40

III,1,1375

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'

41

III,1,1378

That's as much as to say, Can she so?

42

III,1,1380

What need a man care for a stock with a wench, when
she can knit him a stock?

43

III,1,1383

A special virtue: for then she need not be washed
and scoured.

44

III,1,1386

Then may I set the world on wheels, when she can
spin for her living.

45

III,1,1389

That's as much as to say, bastard virtues; that,
indeed, know not their fathers and therefore have no names.

46

III,1,1392

Close at the heels of her virtues.

47

III,1,1395

Well, that fault may be mended with a breakfast. Read on.

48

III,1,1397

That makes amends for her sour breath.

49

III,1,1399

It's no matter for that, so she sleep not in her talk.

50

III,1,1401

O villain, that set this down among her vices! To
be slow in words is a woman's only virtue: I pray...

51

III,1,1405

Out with that too; it was Eve's legacy, and cannot
be ta'en from her.

52

III,1,1408

I care not for that neither, because I love crusts.

53

III,1,1410

Well, the best is, she hath no teeth to bite.

54

III,1,1412

If her liquor be good, she shall: if she will not, I
will; for good things should be praised.

55

III,1,1415

Of her tongue she cannot, for that's writ down she
is slow of; of her purse she shall not, for that...

56

III,1,1421

Stop there; I'll have her: she was mine, and not
mine, twice or thrice in that last article....

57

III,1,1425

More hair than wit? It may be; I'll prove it. The
cover of the salt hides the salt, and therefore it...

58

III,1,1431

That's monstrous: O, that that were out!

59

III,1,1433

Why, that word makes the faults gracious. Well,
I'll have her; and if it be a match, as nothing is...

60

III,1,1437

Why, then will I tell thee—that thy master stays
for thee at the North-gate.

61

III,1,1440

For thee! ay, who art thou? he hath stayed for a
better man than thee.

62

III,1,1443

Thou must run to him, for thou hast stayed so long
that going will scarce serve the turn.

63

III,1,1447

Now will he be swinged for reading my letter; an
unmannerly slave, that will thrust himself into...

64

IV,4,1834

When a man's servant shall play the cur with him,
look you, it goes hard: one that I brought up of a...

65

IV,4,1881

Marry, sir, I carried Mistress Silvia the dog you bade me.

66

IV,4,1883

Marry, she says your dog was a cur, and tells you
currish thanks is good enough for such a present.

67

IV,4,1886

No, indeed, did she not: here have I brought him
back again.

68

IV,4,1889

Ay, sir: the other squirrel was stolen from me by
the hangman boys in the market-place: and then I...

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