Speeches (Lines) for Luciana
in "Comedy of Errors"

Total: 43

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,276

Perhaps some merchant hath invited him,
And from the mart he's somewhere gone to dinner.
Good sister, let us dine and never fret:
A man is master of his liberty:
Time is their master, and, when they see time,
They'll go or come: if so, be patient, sister.

2

II,1,283

Because their business still lies out o' door.

3

II,1,285

O, know he is the bridle of your will.

4

II,1,287

Why, headstrong liberty is lash'd with woe.
There's nothing situate under heaven's eye
But hath his bound, in earth, in sea, in sky:
The beasts, the fishes, and the winged fowls,
Are their males' subjects and at their controls:
Men, more divine, the masters of all these,
Lords of the wide world and wild watery seas,
Indued with intellectual sense and souls,
Of more preeminence than fish and fowls,
Are masters to their females, and their lords:
Then let your will attend on their accords.

5

II,1,299

Not this, but troubles of the marriage-bed.

6

II,1,301

Ere I learn love, I'll practise to obey.

7

II,1,303

Till he come home again, I would forbear.

8

II,1,314

Well, I will marry one day, but to try.
Here comes your man; now is your husband nigh.

9

II,1,323

Spake he so doubtfully, thou couldst not feel his meaning?

10

II,1,342

Quoth who?

11

II,1,360

Fie, how impatience loureth in your face!

12

II,1,376

Self-harming jealousy! fie, beat it hence!

13

II,1,390

How many fond fools serve mad jealousy!

14

II,2,541

Fie, brother! how the world is changed with you!
When were you wont to use my sister thus?
She sent for you by Dromio home to dinner.

15

II,2,576

Dromio, go bid the servants spread for dinner.

16

II,2,582

Why pratest thou to thyself and answer'st not?
Dromio, thou drone, thou snail, thou slug, thou sot!

17

II,2,589

If thou art changed to aught, 'tis to an ass.

18

II,2,609

Come, come, Antipholus, we dine too late.

19

III,2,763

And may it be that you have quite forgot
A husband's office? shall, Antipholus.
Even in the spring of love, thy love-springs rot?
Shall love, in building, grow so ruinous?
If you did wed my sister for her wealth,
Then for her wealth's sake use her with more kindness:
Or if you like elsewhere, do it by stealth;
Muffle your false love with some show of blindness:
Let not my sister read it in your eye;
Be not thy tongue thy own shame's orator;
Look sweet, be fair, become disloyalty;
Apparel vice like virtue's harbinger;
Bear a fair presence, though your heart be tainted;
Teach sin the carriage of a holy saint;
Be secret-false: what need she be acquainted?
What simple thief brags of his own attaint?
'Tis double wrong, to truant with your bed
And let her read it in thy looks at board:
Shame hath a bastard fame, well managed;
Ill deeds are doubled with an evil word.
Alas, poor women! make us but believe,
Being compact of credit, that you love us;
Though others have the arm, show us the sleeve;
We in your motion turn and you may move us.
Then, gentle brother, get you in again;
Comfort my sister, cheer her, call her wife:
'Tis holy sport to be a little vain,
When the sweet breath of flattery conquers strife.

20

III,2,815

What, are you mad, that you do reason so?

21

III,2,817

It is a fault that springeth from your eye.

22

III,2,819

Gaze where you should, and that will clear your sight.

23

III,2,821

Why call you me love? call my sister so.

24

III,2,823

That's my sister.

25

III,2,829

All this my sister is, or else should be.

26

III,2,834

O, soft, air! hold you still:
I'll fetch my sister, to get her good will.

27

IV,2,1078

First he denied you had in him no right.

28

IV,2,1080

Then swore he that he was a stranger here.

29

IV,2,1082

Then pleaded I for you.

30

IV,2,1084

That love I begg'd for you he begg'd of me.

31

IV,2,1086

With words that in an honest suit might move.
First he did praise my beauty, then my speech.

32

IV,2,1089

Have patience, I beseech.

33

IV,2,1096

Who would be jealous then of such a one?
No evil lost is wail'd when it is gone.

34

IV,2,1104

How hast thou lost thy breath?

35

IV,4,1300

Alas, how fiery and how sharp he looks!

36

IV,4,1340

And I am witness with her that she did.

37

IV,4,1361

Ay me, poor man, how pale and wan he looks!

38

IV,4,1384

God help, poor souls, how idly do they talk!

39

IV,4,1404

God, for thy mercy! they are loose again.

40

V,1,1518

She never reprehended him but mildly,
When he demean'd himself rough, rude and wildly.
Why bear you these rebukes and answer not?

41

V,1,1545

Complain unto the duke of this indignity.

42

V,1,1561

Kneel to the duke before he pass the abbey.
[Enter DUKE SOLINUS, attended; AEGEON bareheaded; with the]
Headsman and other Officers]

43

V,1,1647

Ne'er may I look on day, nor sleep on night,
But she tells to your highness simple truth!

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