Speeches (Lines) for King Phillip
in "King John"

Total: 43

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,327

Well then, to work: our cannon shall be bent
Against the brows of this resisting town....

2

II,1,341

A wonder, lady! lo, upon thy wish,
Our messenger Chatillon is arrived!...

3

II,1,371

How much unlook'd for is this expedition!

4

II,1,383

Peace be to England, if that war return
From France to England, there to live in peace....

5

II,1,406

From that supernal judge, that stirs good thoughts
In any breast of strong authority,...

6

II,1,413

Excuse; it is to beat usurping down.

7

II,1,445

Lewis, determine what we shall do straight.

8

II,1,494

Peace, lady! pause, or be more temperate:
It ill beseems this presence to cry aim...

9

II,1,502

'Tis France, for England.

10

II,1,505

You loving men of Angiers, Arthur's subjects,
Our trumpet call'd you to this gentle parle—

11

II,1,536

When I have said, make answer to us both.
Lo, in this right hand, whose protection...

12

II,1,579

As many and as well-born bloods as those,—

13

II,1,581

Stand in his face to contradict his claim.

14

II,1,588

Amen, amen! Mount, chevaliers! to arms!

15

II,1,602

It shall be so; and at the other hill
Command the rest to stand. God and our right!...

16

II,1,651

England, thou hast not saved one drop of blood,
In this hot trial, more than we of France;...

17

II,1,672

Speak, citizens, for England; who's your king?

18

II,1,674

Know him in us, that here hold up his right.

19

II,1,718

Let it be so. Say, where will you assault?

20

II,1,722

Our thunder from the south
Shall rain their drift of bullets on this town.

21

II,1,794

Speak England first, that hath been forward first
To speak unto this city: what say you?

22

II,1,807

What say'st thou, boy? look in the lady's face.

23

II,1,846

It likes us well; young princes, close your hands.

24

II,1,849

Now, citizens of Angiers, ope your gates,
Let in that amity which you have made;...

25

II,1,858

And, by my faith, this league that we have made
Will give her sadness very little cure....

26

III,1,994

'Tis true, fair daughter; and this blessed day
Ever in France shall be kept festival:...

27

III,1,1016

By heaven, lady, you shall have no cause
To curse the fair proceedings of this day:...

28

III,1,1057

Here comes the holy legate of the pope.

29

III,1,1083

Brother of England, you blaspheme in this.

30

III,1,1146

I am perplex'd, and know not what to say.

31

III,1,1149

Good reverend father, make my person yours,
And tell me how you would bestow yourself....

32

III,1,1187

I may disjoin my hand, but not my faith.

33

III,1,1248

Thou shalt not need. England, I will fall from thee.

34

III,1,1273

Thy rage sham burn thee up, and thou shalt turn
To ashes, ere our blood shall quench that fire:...

35

III,4,1384

So, by a roaring tempest on the flood,
A whole armado of convicted sail...

36

III,4,1388

What can go well, when we have run so ill?
Are we not beaten? Is not Angiers lost?...

37

III,4,1398

Well could I bear that England had this praise,
So we could find some pattern of our shame....

38

III,4,1406

Patience, good lady! comfort, gentle Constance!

39

III,4,1421

O fair affliction, peace!

40

III,4,1446

Bind up those tresses. O, what love I note
In the fair multitude of those her hairs!...

41

III,4,1454

Bind up your hairs.

42

III,4,1478

You are as fond of grief as of your child.

43

III,4,1493

I fear some outrage, and I'll follow her.

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