Speeches (Lines) for John of Gaunt
in "Richard II"

Total: 28

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,9

I have, my liege.

2

I,1,14

As near as I could sift him on that argument,
On some apparent danger seen in him...

3

I,1,163

To be a make-peace shall become my age:
Throw down, my son, the Duke of Norfolk's gage.

4

I,1,166

When, Harry, when?
Obedience bids I should not bid again.

5

I,2,214

Alas, the part I had in Woodstock's blood
Doth more solicit me than your exclaims,...

6

I,2,250

God's is the quarrel; for God's substitute,
His deputy anointed in His sight,...

7

I,2,256

To God, the widow's champion and defence.

8

I,2,269

Sister, farewell; I must to Coventry:
As much good stay with thee as go with me!

9

I,3,373

God in thy good cause make thee prosperous!
Be swift like lightning in the execution;...

10

I,3,516

I thank my liege, that in regard of me
He shortens four years of my son's exile:...

11

I,3,526

But not a minute, king, that thou canst give:
Shorten my days thou canst with sullen sorrow,...

12

I,3,536

Things sweet to taste prove in digestion sour.
You urged me as a judge; but I had rather...

13

I,3,554

O, to what purpose dost thou hoard thy words,
That thou return'st no greeting to thy friends?

14

I,3,559

Thy grief is but thy absence for a time.

15

I,3,561

What is six winters? they are quickly gone.

16

I,3,563

Call it a travel that thou takest for pleasure.

17

I,3,566

The sullen passage of thy weary steps
Esteem as foil wherein thou art to set...

18

I,3,576

All places that the eye of heaven visits
Are to a wise man ports and happy havens....

19

I,3,605

Come, come, my son, I'll bring thee on thy way:
Had I thy youth and cause, I would not stay.

20

II,1,683

Will the king come, that I may breathe my last
In wholesome counsel to his unstaid youth?

21

II,1,687

O, but they say the tongues of dying men
Enforce attention like deep harmony:...

22

II,1,713

Methinks I am a prophet new inspired
And thus expiring do foretell of him:...

23

II,1,757

O how that name befits my composition!
Old Gaunt indeed, and gaunt in being old:...

24

II,1,769

No, misery makes sport to mock itself:
Since thou dost seek to kill my name in me,...

25

II,1,773

No, no, men living flatter those that die.

26

II,1,775

O, no! thou diest, though I the sicker be.

27

II,1,777

Now He that made me knows I see thee ill;
Ill in myself to see, and in thee seeing ill....

28

II,1,808

O, spare me not, my brother Edward's son,
For that I was his father Edward's son;...

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