Speeches (Lines) for Joan la Pucelle
in "Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 46

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,262

Reignier, is't thou that thinkest to beguile me?
Where is the Dauphin? Come, come from behind;...

2

I,2,269

Dauphin, I am by birth a shepherd's daughter,
My wit untrain'd in any kind of art....

3

I,2,295

I am prepared: here is my keen-edged sword,
Deck'd with five flower-de-luces on each side;...

4

I,2,301

And while I live, I'll ne'er fly from a man.

5

I,2,305

Christ's mother helps me, else I were too weak.

6

I,2,312

I must not yield to any rites of love,
For my profession's sacred from above:...

7

I,2,325

Why, no, I say, distrustful recreants!
Fight till the last gasp; I will be your guard.

8

I,2,328

Assign'd am I to be the English scourge.
This night the siege assuredly I'll raise:...

9

I,5,588

Come, come, 'tis only I that must disgrace thee.

10

I,5,595

Talbot, farewell; thy hour is not yet come:
I must go victual Orleans forthwith....

11

I,6,629

Advance our waving colours on the walls;
Rescued is Orleans from the English...

12

II,1,726

Wherefore is Charles impatient with his friend!
At all times will you have my power alike?...

13

II,1,745

Question, my lords, no further of the case,
How or which way: 'tis sure they found some place...

14

III,2,1440

These are the city gates, the gates of Rouen,
Through which our policy must make a breach:...

15

III,2,1454

Paysans, pauvres gens de France;
Poor market folks that come to sell their corn.

16

III,2,1457

Now, Rouen, I'll shake thy bulwarks to the ground.
[Exeunt]...

17

III,2,1471

Behold, this is the happy wedding torch
That joineth Rouen unto her countrymen,...

18

III,2,1494

Good morrow, gallants! want ye corn for bread?
I think the Duke of Burgundy will fast...

19

III,2,1503

What will you do, good grey-beard? break a lance,
And run a tilt at death within a chair?

20

III,2,1511

Are ye so hot, sir? yet, Pucelle, hold thy peace;
If Talbot do but thunder, rain will follow....

21

III,2,1516

Belike your lordship takes us then for fools,
To try if that our own be ours or no.

22

III,2,1525

Away, captains! let's get us from the walls;
For Talbot means no goodness by his looks....

23

III,3,1606

Dismay not, princes, at this accident,
Nor grieve that Rouen is so recovered:...

24

III,3,1622

Then thus it must be; this doth Joan devise:
By fair persuasions mix'd with sugar'd words...

25

III,3,1632

Your honours shall perceive how I will work
To bring this matter to the wished end....

26

III,3,1648

The princely Charles of France, thy countryman.

27

III,3,1651

Brave Burgundy, undoubted hope of France!
Stay, let thy humble handmaid speak to thee.

28

III,3,1654

Look on thy country, look on fertile France,
And see the cities and the towns defaced...

29

III,3,1670

Besides, all French and France exclaims on thee,
Doubting thy birth and lawful progeny....

30

III,3,1695

[Aside] Done like a Frenchman: turn, and turn again!

31

IV,7,2292

Once I encounter'd him, and thus I said:
'Thou maiden youth, be vanquish'd by a maid:'...

32

IV,7,2329

Here is a silly stately style indeed!
The Turk, that two and fifty kingdoms hath,...

33

IV,7,2344

I think this upstart is old Talbot's ghost,
He speaks with such a proud commanding spirit....

34

V,2,2428

Peace be amongst them, if they turn to us;
Else, ruin combat with their palaces!

35

V,2,2441

Of all base passions, fear is most accursed.
Command the conquest, Charles, it shall be thine,...

36

V,3,2447

The regent conquers, and the Frenchmen fly.
Now help, ye charming spells and periapts;...

37

V,3,2492

Changed to a worser shape thou canst not be.

38

V,3,2495

A plaguing mischief light on Charles and thee!
And may ye both be suddenly surprised...

39

V,3,2499

I prithee, give me leave to curse awhile.

40

V,4,2677

Decrepit miser! base ignoble wretch!
I am descended of a gentler blood:...

41

V,4,2691

Peasant, avaunt! You have suborn'd this man,
Of purpose to obscure my noble birth.

42

V,4,2707

First, let me tell you whom you have condemn'd:
Not me begotten of a shepherd swain,...

43

V,4,2730

Will nothing turn your unrelenting hearts?
Then, Joan, discover thine infirmity,...

44

V,4,2743

You are deceived; my child is none of his:
It was Alencon that enjoy'd my love.

45

V,4,2747

O, give me leave, I have deluded you:
'Twas neither Charles nor yet the duke I named,...

46

V,4,2757

Then lead me hence; with whom I leave my curse:
May never glorious sun reflex his beams...

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