Speeches (Lines) for Jack Cade
in "Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 61

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

IV,2,2338

We John Cade, so termed of our supposed father,—

2

IV,2,2340

For our enemies shall fall before us, inspired with
the spirit of putting down kings and princes,...

3

IV,2,2344

My father was a Mortimer,—

4

IV,2,2347

My mother a Plantagenet,—

5

IV,2,2349

My wife descended of the Lacies,—

6

IV,2,2354

Therefore am I of an honourable house.

7

IV,2,2358

Valiant I am.

8

IV,2,2360

I am able to endure much.

9

IV,2,2363

I fear neither sword nor fire.

10

IV,2,2367

Be brave, then; for your captain is brave, and vows
reformation. There shall be in England seven...

11

IV,2,2375

I thank you, good people: there shall be no money;
all shall eat and drink on my score; and I will...

12

IV,2,2380

Nay, that I mean to do. Is not this a lamentable
thing, that of the skin of an innocent lamb should...

13

IV,2,2390

O monstrous!

14

IV,2,2392

Here's a villain!

15

IV,2,2394

Nay, then, he is a conjurer.

16

IV,2,2396

I am sorry for't: the man is a proper man, of mine
honour; unless I find him guilty, he shall not die....

17

IV,2,2402

Let me alone. Dost thou use to write thy name? or
hast thou a mark to thyself, like an honest...

18

IV,2,2409

Away with him, I say! hang him with his pen and
ink-horn about his neck.

19

IV,2,2414

Here I am, thou particular fellow.

20

IV,2,2417

Stand, villain, stand, or I'll fell thee down. He
shall be encountered with a man as good as himself:...

21

IV,2,2421

To equal him, I will make myself a knight presently.
[Kneels]...

22

IV,2,2434

As for these silken-coated slaves, I pass not:
It is to you, good people, that I speak,...

23

IV,2,2440

And Adam was a gardener.

24

IV,2,2442

Marry, this: Edmund Mortimer, Earl of March.
Married the Duke of Clarence' daughter, did he not?

25

IV,2,2445

By her he had two children at one birth.

26

IV,2,2447

Ay, there's the question; but I say, 'tis true:
The elder of them, being put to nurse,...

27

IV,2,2461

[Aside] He lies, for I invented it myself.
Go to, sirrah, tell the king from me, that, for his...

28

IV,2,2468

And good reason; for thereby is England mained, and
fain to go with a staff, but that my puissance holds...

29

IV,2,2475

Nay, answer, if you can: the Frenchmen are our
enemies; go to, then, I ask but this: can he that...

30

IV,2,2489

And you that love the commons, follow me.
Now show yourselves men; 'tis for liberty....

31

IV,2,2496

But then are we in order when we are most
out of order. Come, march forward.

32

IV,3,2501

Where's Dick, the butcher of Ashford?

33

IV,3,2503

They fell before thee like sheep and oxen, and thou
behavedst thyself as if thou hadst been in thine own...

34

IV,3,2510

And, to speak truth, thou deservest no less. This
monument of the victory will I bear;...

35

IV,3,2518

Fear not that, I warrant thee. Come, let's march
towards London.

36

IV,6,2603

Now is Mortimer lord of this city. And here, sitting
upon London-stone, I charge and command that, of the...

37

IV,6,2611

Knock him down there.

38

IV,6,2617

Come, then, let's go fight with them; but first, go
and set London bridge on fire; and, if you can, burn...

39

IV,7,2623

So, sirs: now go some and pull down the Savoy;
others to the inns of court; down with them all.

40

IV,7,2626

Be it a lordship, thou shalt have it for that word.

41

IV,7,2633

I have thought upon it, it shall be so. Away, burn
all the records of the realm: my mouth shall be...

42

IV,7,2638

And henceforward all things shall be in common.

43

IV,7,2645

Well, he shall be beheaded for it ten times. Ah,
thou say, thou serge, nay, thou buckram lord! now...

44

IV,7,2670

Marry, thou oughtest not to let thy horse wear a
cloak, when honester men than thou go in their hose...

45

IV,7,2678

Away with him, away with him! he speaks Latin.

46

IV,7,2699

Tut, when struck'st thou one blow in the field?

47

IV,7,2704

Give him a box o' the ear and that will make 'em red again.

48

IV,7,2707

Ye shall have a hempen caudle, then, and the help of hatchet.

49

IV,7,2710

Nay, he nods at us, as who should say, I'll be even
with you: I'll see if his head will stand steadier...

50

IV,7,2721

[Aside] I feel remorse in myself with his words;
but I'll bridle it: he shall die, an it be but for...

51

IV,7,2734

Away with him! and do as I command ye.
[Exeunt some with Lord SAY]...

52

IV,7,2744

Marry, presently.

53

IV,7,2747

But is not this braver? Let them kiss one another,
for they loved well when they were alive. Now part...

54

IV,8,2757

Up Fish Street! down Saint Magnus' Corner! Kill
and knock down! throw them into Thames!...

55

IV,8,2777

What, Buckingham and Clifford, are ye so brave? And
you, base peasants, do ye believe him? will you...

56

IV,8,2812

Was ever feather so lightly blown to and fro as this
multitude? The name of Henry the Fifth hales them...

57

IV,10,2887

Fie on ambition! fie on myself, that have a sword,
and yet am ready to famish! These five days have I...

58

IV,10,2912

Here's the lord of the soil come to seize me for a
stray, for entering his fee-simple without leave....

59

IV,10,2924

Brave thee! ay, by the best blood that ever was
broached, and beard thee too. Look on me well: I...

60

IV,10,2942

By my valour, the most complete champion that ever I
heard! Steel, if thou turn the edge, or cut not out...

61

IV,10,2960

Iden, farewell, and be proud of thy victory. Tell
Kent from me, she hath lost her best man, and exhort...

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