Speeches (Lines) for Imogen
in "Cymbeline"

Total: 118

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,101

O
Dissembling courtesy! How fine this tyrant...

2

I,1,134

Nay, stay a little:
Were you but riding forth to air yourself,...

3

I,1,153

O the gods!
When shall we see again?

4

I,1,164

There cannot be a pinch in death
More sharp than this is.

5

I,1,169

I beseech you, sir,
Harm not yourself with your vexation...

6

I,1,174

Past hope, and in despair; that way, past grace.

7

I,1,176

O blest, that I might not! I chose an eagle,
And did avoid a puttock.

8

I,1,180

No; I rather added
A lustre to it.

9

I,1,183

Sir,
It is your fault that I have loved Posthumus:...

10

I,1,189

Almost, sir: heaven restore me! Would I were
A neat-herd's daughter, and my Leonatus...

11

I,1,216

Your son's my father's friend; he takes his part.
To draw upon an exile! O brave sir!...

12

I,1,230

About some half-hour hence,
I pray you, speak with me: you shall at least...

13

I,3,271

I would thou grew'st unto the shores o' the haven,
And question'dst every sail: if he should write...

14

I,3,277

Then waved his handkerchief?

15

I,3,279

Senseless Linen! happier therein than I!
And that was all?

16

I,3,288

Thou shouldst have made him
As little as a crow, or less, ere left...

17

I,3,292

I would have broke mine eye-strings; crack'd them, but
To look upon him, till the diminution...

18

I,3,301

I did not take my leave of him, but had
Most pretty things to say: ere I could tell him...

19

I,3,317

Those things I bid you do, get them dispatch'd.
I will attend the queen.

20

I,6,602

A father cruel, and a step-dame false;
A foolish suitor to a wedded lady,...

21

I,6,618

Thanks, good sir:
You're kindly welcome.

22

I,6,627

[Reads] 'He is one of the noblest note, to whose
kindnesses I am most infinitely tied. Reflect upon...

23

I,6,645

What makes your admiration?

24

I,6,654

What is the matter, trow?

25

I,6,659

What, dear sir,
Thus raps you? Are you well?

26

I,6,669

Continues well my lord? His health, beseech you?

27

I,6,671

Is he disposed to mirth? I hope he is.

28

I,6,675

When he was here,
He did incline to sadness, and oft-times...

29

I,6,689

Will my lord say so?

30

I,6,694

Not he, I hope.

31

I,6,700

What do you pity, sir?

32

I,6,702

Am I one, sir?
You look on me: what wreck discern you in me...

33

I,6,708

I pray you, sir,
Deliver with more openness your answers...

34

I,6,715

You do seem to know
Something of me, or what concerns me: pray you,—...

35

I,6,736

My lord, I fear,
Has forgot Britain.

36

I,6,743

Let me hear no more.

37

I,6,755

Revenged!
How should I be revenged? If this be true,—...

38

I,6,768

What, ho, Pisanio!

39

I,6,770

Away! I do condemn mine ears that have
So long attended thee. If thou wert honourable,...

40

I,6,798

You make amends.

41

I,6,809

All's well, sir: take my power i' the court
for yours.

42

I,6,816

Pray, what is't?

43

I,6,826

Willingly;
And pawn mine honour for their safety: since...

44

I,6,834

O, no, no.

45

I,6,839

I thank you for your pains:
But not away to-morrow!

46

I,6,846

I will write.
Send your trunk to me; it shall safe be kept,...

47

II,2,919

Who's there? my woman Helen?

48

II,2,921

What hour is it?

49

II,2,923

I have read three hours then: mine eyes are weak:
Fold down the leaf where I have left: to bed:...

50

II,3,1083

Good morrow, sir. You lay out too much pains
For purchasing but trouble; the thanks I give...

51

II,3,1088

If you but said so, 'twere as deep with me:
If you swear still, your recompense is still...

52

II,3,1092

But that you shall not say I yield being silent,
I would not speak. I pray you, spare me: 'faith,...

53

II,3,1099

Fools are not mad folks.

54

II,3,1101

As I am mad, I do:
If you'll be patient, I'll no more be mad;...

55

II,3,1125

Profane fellow
Wert thou the son of Jupiter and no more...

56

II,3,1134

He never can meet more mischance than come
To be but named of thee. His meanest garment,...

57

II,3,1141

To Dorothy my woman hie thee presently—

58

II,3,1143

I am sprited with a fool.
Frighted, and anger'd worse: go bid my woman...

59

II,3,1154

I hope so: go and search.

60

II,3,1158

Ay, I said so, sir:
If you will make't an action, call witness to't.

61

II,3,1161

Your mother too:
She's my good lady, and will conceive, I hope,...

62

III,2,1533

How now, Pisanio!

63

III,2,1535

Who? thy lord? that is my lord, Leonatus!
O, learn'd indeed were that astronomer...

64

III,2,1584

Why, one that rode to's execution, man,
Could never go so slow: I have heard of...

65

III,2,1594

I see before me, man: nor here, nor here,
Nor what ensues, but have a fog in them,...

66

III,4,1720

Thou told'st me, when we came from horse, the place
Was near at hand: ne'er long'd my mother so...

67

III,4,1741

[Reads] 'Thy mistress, Pisanio, hath played the
strumpet in my bed; the testimonies whereof lie...

68

III,4,1761

False to his bed! What is it to be false?
To lie in watch there and to think on him?...

69

III,4,1768

I false! Thy conscience witness: Iachimo,
Thou didst accuse him of incontinency;...

70

III,4,1781

True honest men being heard, like false Aeneas,
Were in his time thought false, and Sinon's weeping...

71

III,4,1799

Why, I must die;
And if I do not by thy hand, thou art...

72

III,4,1829

Do't, and to bed then.

73

III,4,1831

Wherefore then
Didst undertake it? Why hast thou abused...

74

III,4,1844

Talk thy tongue weary; speak
I have heard I am a strumpet; and mine ear...

75

III,4,1850

Most like;
Bringing me here to kill me.

76

III,4,1858

Some Roman courtezan.

77

III,4,1864

Why good fellow,
What shall I do the where? where bide? how live?...

78

III,4,1869

No court, no father; nor no more ado
With that harsh, noble, simple nothing,...

79

III,4,1875

Where then
Hath Britain all the sun that shines? Day, night,...

80

III,4,1893

O, for such means!
Though peril to my modesty, not death on't,...

81

III,4,1909

Nay, be brief
I see into thy end, and am almost...

82

III,4,1925

Thou art all the comfort
The gods will diet me with. Prithee, away:...

83

III,4,1940

Amen: I thank thee.

84

III,6,2144

I see a man's life is a tedious one:
I have tired myself, and for two nights together...

85

III,6,2196

Good masters, harm me not:
Before I enter'd here, I call'd; and thought...

86

III,6,2209

I see you're angry:
Know, if you kill me for my fault, I should...

87

III,6,2213

To Milford-Haven.

88

III,6,2215

Fidele, sir. I have a kinsman who
Is bound for Italy; he embark'd at Milford;...

89

III,6,2233

'Mongst friends,
If brothers....

90

III,6,2246

Great men,
That had a court no bigger than this cave,...

91

III,6,2262

Thanks, sir.

92

IV,2,2320

So man and man should be;
But clay and clay differs in dignity,...

93

IV,2,2324

So sick I am not, yet I am not well;
But not so citizen a wanton as...

94

IV,2,2352

I wish ye sport.

95

IV,2,2354

[Aside] These are kind creatures. Gods, what lies
I have heard!...

96

IV,2,2373

Well or ill,
I am bound to you.

97

IV,2,2692

[Awaking] Yes, sir, to Milford-Haven; which is
the way?—...

98

IV,2,2780

I am nothing: or if not,
Nothing to be were better. This was my master,...

99

IV,2,2791

Richard du Champ.
[Aside]...

100

IV,2,2797

Fidele, sir.

101

IV,2,2805

I'll follow, sir. But first, an't please the gods,
I'll hide my master from the flies, as deep...

102

V,5,3486

I humbly thank your highness.

103

V,5,3489

No, no: alack,
There's other work in hand: I see a thing...

104

V,5,3501

He is a Roman; no more kin to me
Than I to your highness; who, being born your vassal,...

105

V,5,3505

I'll tell you, sir, in private, if you please
To give me hearing.

106

V,5,3509

Fidele, sir.

107

V,5,3535

My boon is, that this gentleman may render
Of whom he had this ring.

108

V,5,3637

Peace, my lord; hear, hear—

109

V,5,3651

O, get thee from my sight;
Thou gavest me poison: dangerous fellow, hence!...

110

V,5,3660

It poison'd me.

111

V,5,3678

Most like I did, for I was dead.

112

V,5,3682

Why did you throw your wedded lady from you?
Think that you are upon a rock; and now...

113

V,5,3691

[Kneeling] Your blessing, sir.

114

V,5,3698

I am sorry for't, my lord.

115

V,5,3733

That headless man
I thought had been my lord.

116

V,5,3828

No, my lord;
I have got two worlds by 't. O my gentle brothers,...

117

V,5,3860

You are my father too, and did relieve me,
To see this gracious season.

118

V,5,3865

My good master,
I will yet do you service.

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