Speeches (Lines) for Iachimo
in "Cymbeline"

Total: 77

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,4,323

Believe it, sir, I have seen him in Britain: he was
then of a crescent note, expected to prove so worthy...

2

I,4,333

This matter of marrying his king's daughter, wherein
he must be weighed rather by her value than his own,...

3

I,4,337

Ay, and the approbation of those that weep this
lamentable divorce under her colours are wonderfully...

4

I,4,370

Can we, with manners, ask what was the difference?

5

I,4,380

That lady is not now living, or this gentleman's
opinion by this worn out.

6

I,4,383

You must not so far prefer her 'fore ours of Italy.

7

I,4,387

As fair and as good—a kind of hand-in-hand
comparison—had been something too fair and too good...

8

I,4,395

What do you esteem it at?

9

I,4,397

Either your unparagoned mistress is dead, or she's
outprized by a trifle.

10

I,4,403

Which the gods have given you?

11

I,4,405

You may wear her in title yours: but, you know,
strange fowl light upon neighbouring ponds. Your...

12

I,4,419

With five times so much conversation, I should get
ground of your fair mistress, make her go back, even...

13

I,4,423

I dare thereupon pawn the moiety of my estate to
your ring; which, in my opinion, o'ervalues it...

14

I,4,432

What's that?

15

I,4,438

Would I had put my estate and my neighbour's on the
approbation of what I have spoke!

16

I,4,441

Yours; whom in constancy you think stands so safe.
I will lay you ten thousand ducats to your ring,...

17

I,4,449

You are afraid, and therein the wiser. If you buy
ladies' flesh at a million a dram, you cannot...

18

I,4,455

I am the master of my speeches, and would undergo
what's spoken, I swear.

19

I,4,462

By the gods, it is one. If I bring you no
sufficient testimony that I have enjoyed the dearest...

20

I,4,479

Your hand; a covenant: we will have these things set
down by lawful counsel, and straight away for...

21

I,6,614

Change you, madam?
The worthy Leonatus is in safety...

22

I,6,620

[Aside] All of her that is out of door most rich!
If she be furnish'd with a mind so rare,...

23

I,6,637

Thanks, fairest lady.
What, are men mad? Hath nature given them eyes...

24

I,6,646

It cannot be i' the eye, for apes and monkeys
'Twixt two such shes would chatter this way and...

25

I,6,655

The cloyed will,
That satiate yet unsatisfied desire, that tub...

26

I,6,661

Thanks, madam; well.
[To PISANIO]...

27

I,6,670

Well, madam.

28

I,6,672

Exceeding pleasant; none a stranger there
So merry and so gamesome: he is call'd...

29

I,6,678

I never saw him sad.
There is a Frenchman his companion, one...

30

I,6,690

Ay, madam, with his eyes in flood with laughter:
It is a recreation to be by...

31

I,6,695

Not he: but yet heaven's bounty towards him might
Be used more thankfully. In himself, 'tis much;...

32

I,6,701

Two creatures heartily.

33

I,6,705

Lamentable! What,
To hide me from the radiant sun and solace...

34

I,6,711

That others do—
I was about to say—enjoy your—But...

35

I,6,722

Had I this cheek
To bathe my lips upon; this hand, whose touch,...

36

I,6,738

And himself. Not I,
Inclined to this intelligence, pronounce...

37

I,6,744

O dearest soul! your cause doth strike my heart
With pity, that doth make me sick. A lady...

38

I,6,760

Should he make me
Live, like Diana's priest, betwixt cold sheets,...

39

I,6,769

Let me my service tender on your lips.

40

I,6,785

O happy Leonatus! I may say
The credit that thy lady hath of thee...

41

I,6,799

He sits 'mongst men like a descended god:
He hath a kind of honour sets him off,...

42

I,6,811

My humble thanks. I had almost forgot
To entreat your grace but in a small request,...

43

I,6,817

Some dozen Romans of us and your lord—
The best feather of our wing—have mingled sums...

44

I,6,830

They are in a trunk,
Attended by my men: I will make bold...

45

I,6,835

Yes, I beseech; or I shall short my word
By lengthening my return. From Gallia...

46

I,6,841

O, I must, madam:
Therefore I shall beseech you, if you please...

47

II,2,933

The crickets sing, and man's o'er-labour'd sense
Repairs itself by rest. Our Tarquin thus...

48

II,4,1208

Your lady
Is one of the fairest that I have look'd upon.

49

II,4,1213

Here are letters for you.

50

II,4,1215

'Tis very like.

51

II,4,1218

He was expected then,
But not approach'd.

52

II,4,1223

If I had lost it,
I should have lost the worth of it in gold....

53

II,4,1229

Not a whit,
Your lady being so easy.

54

II,4,1234

Good sir, we must,
If you keep covenant. Had I not brought...

55

II,4,1248

Sir, my circumstances,
Being so near the truth as I will make them,...

56

II,4,1255

First, her bedchamber,—
Where, I confess, I slept not, but profess...

57

II,4,1269

More particulars
Must justify my knowledge.

58

II,4,1273

The chimney
Is south the chamber, and the chimney-piece...

59

II,4,1282

The roof o' the chamber
With golden cherubins is fretted: her andirons—...

60

II,4,1292

Then, if you can,
[Showing the bracelet]...

61

II,4,1300

Sir—I thank her—that:
She stripp'd it from her arm; I see her yet;...

62

II,4,1307

She writes so to you, doth she?

63

II,4,1326

By Jupiter, I had it from her arm.

64

II,4,1342

If you seek
For further satisfying, under her breast—...

65

II,4,1352

Will you hear more?

66

II,4,1355

I'll be sworn—

67

II,4,1360

I'll deny nothing.

68

II,4,1369

With an my heart.

69

V,2,2993

The heaviness and guilt within my bosom
Takes off my manhood: I have belied a lady,...

70

V,2,3017

'Tis their fresh supplies.

71

V,5,3540

Thou'lt torture me to leave unspoken that
Which, to be spoke, would torture thee.

72

V,5,3543

I am glad to be constrain'd to utter that
Which torments me to conceal. By villany...

73

V,5,3551

That paragon, thy daughter,—
For whom my heart drops blood, and my false spirits...

74

V,5,3557

Upon a time,—unhappy was the clock
That struck the hour!—it was in Rome,—accursed...

75

V,5,3575

All too soon I shall,
Unless thou wouldst grieve quickly. This Posthumus,...

76

V,5,3587

Your daughter's chastity—there it begins.
He spake of her, as Dian had hot dreams,...

77

V,5,3877

[Kneeling] I am down again:
But now my heavy conscience sinks my knee,...

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