Speeches (Lines) for Henry VI
in "Henry VI, Part III"

Total: 71

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,56

My lords, look where the sturdy rebel sits,
Even in the chair of state: belike he means,...

2

I,1,67

Be patient, gentle Earl of Westmoreland.

3

I,1,73

Ah, know you not the city favours them,
And they have troops of soldiers at their beck?

4

I,1,76

Far be the thought of this from Henry's heart,
To make a shambles of the parliament-house!...

5

I,1,91

And shall I stand, and thou sit in my throne?

6

I,1,111

What title hast thou, traitor, to the crown?
Thy father was, as thou art, Duke of York;...

7

I,1,118

The lord protector lost it, and not I:
When I was crown'd I was but nine months old.

8

I,1,127

Peace, thou! and give King Henry leave to speak.

9

I,1,131

Think'st thou that I will leave my kingly throne,
Wherein my grandsire and my father sat?...

10

I,1,139

Henry the Fourth by conquest got the crown.

11

I,1,141

[Aside] I know not what to say; my title's weak.—
Tell me, may not a king adopt an heir?

12

I,1,144

An if he may, then am I lawful king;
For Richard, in the view of many lords,...

13

I,1,154

Art thou against us, Duke of Exeter?

14

I,1,158

[Aside] All will revolt from me, and turn to him.

15

I,1,170

O Clifford, how thy words revive my heart!

16

I,1,179

My Lord of Warwick, hear me but one word:
Let me for this my life-time reign as king.

17

I,1,183

I am content: Richard Plantagenet,
Enjoy the kingdom after my decease.

18

I,1,201

Ah, Exeter!

19

I,1,203

Not for myself, Lord Warwick, but my son,
Whom I unnaturally shall disinherit....

20

I,1,214

And long live thou and these thy forward sons!

21

I,1,225

And I, with grief and sorrow, to the court.

22

I,1,229

Exeter, so will I.

23

I,1,231

Be patient, gentle queen, and I will stay.

24

I,1,245

Pardon me, Margaret; pardon me, sweet son:
The Earl of Warwick and the duke enforced me.

25

I,1,274

Stay, gentle Margaret, and hear me speak.

26

I,1,276

Gentle son Edward, thou wilt stay with me?

27

I,1,282

Poor queen! how love to me and to her son
Hath made her break out into terms of rage!...

28

II,2,847

Ay, as the rocks cheer them that fear their wreck:
To see this sight, it irks my very soul....

29

II,2,885

Full well hath Clifford play'd the orator,
Inferring arguments of mighty force....

30

II,2,903

Edward Plantagenet, arise a knight;
And learn this lesson, draw thy sword in right.

31

II,2,919

Why, that's my fortune too; therefore I'll stay.

32

II,2,962

Have done with words, my lords, and hear me speak.

33

II,2,964

I prithee, give no limits to my tongue:
I am a king, and privileged to speak.

34

II,5,1103

This battle fares like to the morning's war,
When dying clouds contend with growing light,...

35

II,5,1177

O piteous spectacle! O bloody times!
Whiles lions war and battle for their dens,...

36

II,5,1199

Woe above woe! grief more than common grief!
O that my death would stay these ruthful deeds!...

37

II,5,1212

How will the country for these woful chances
Misthink the king and not be satisfied!

38

II,5,1216

Was ever king so grieved for subjects' woe?
Much is your sorrow; mine ten times so much.

39

II,5,1230

Sad-hearted men, much overgone with care,
Here sits a king more woful than you are....

40

II,5,1246

Nay, take me with thee, good sweet Exeter:
Not that I fear to stay, but love to go...

41

III,1,1380

From Scotland am I stol'n, even of pure love,
To greet mine own land with my wishful sight....

42

III,1,1391

Let me embrace thee, sour adversity,
For wise men say it is the wisest course.

43

III,1,1395

My queen and son are gone to France for aid;
And, as I hear, the great commanding Warwick...

44

III,1,1423

More than I seem, and less than I was born to:
A man at least, for less I should not be;...

45

III,1,1427

Why, so I am, in mind; and that's enough.

46

III,1,1429

My crown is in my heart, not on my head;
Not decked with diamonds and Indian stones,...

47

III,1,1439

But did you never swear, and break an oath?

48

III,1,1441

Where did you dwell when I was King of England?

49

III,1,1443

I was anointed king at nine months old;
My father and my grandfather were kings,...

50

III,1,1449

Why, am I dead? do I not breathe a man?
Ah, simple men, you know not what you swear!...

51

III,1,1462

So would you be again to Henry,
If he were seated as King Edward is.

52

III,1,1466

In God's name, lead; your king's name be obey'd:
And what God will, that let your king perform;...

53

IV,6,2315

Master lieutenant, now that God and friends
Have shaken Edward from the regal seat,...

54

IV,6,2323

For what, lieutenant? for well using me?
Nay, be thou sure I'll well requite thy kindness,...

55

IV,6,2352

Warwick and Clarence give me both your hands:
Now join your hands, and with your hands your hearts,...

56

IV,6,2372

But, with the first of all your chief affairs,
Let me entreat, for I command no more,...

57

IV,6,2379

My Lord of Somerset, what youth is that,
Of whom you seem to have so tender care?

58

IV,6,2382

Come hither, England's hope.
[Lays his hand on his head]...

59

IV,8,2527

Let's levy men, and beat him back again.

60

IV,8,2546

Farewell, my Hector, and my Troy's true hope.

61

IV,8,2548

Well-minded Clarence, be thou fortunate!

62

IV,8,2551

Sweet Oxford, and my loving Montague,
And all at once, once more a happy farewell.

63

IV,8,2555

Here at the palace I will rest awhile.
Cousin of Exeter, what thinks your lordship?...

64

IV,8,2560

That's not my fear; my meed hath got me fame:
I have not stopp'd mine ears to their demands,...

65

V,6,2996

Ay, my good lord:—my lord, I should say rather;
'Tis sin to flatter; 'good' was little better:...

66

V,6,3002

So flies the reckless shepherd from the wolf;
So first the harmless sheep doth yield his fleece...

67

V,6,3008

The bird that hath been limed in a bush,
With trembling wings misdoubteth every bush;...

68

V,6,3016

I, Daedalus; my poor boy, Icarus;
Thy father, Minos, that denied our course;...

69

V,6,3026

A persecutor, I am sure, thou art:
If murdering innocents be executing,...

70

V,6,3030

Hadst thou been kill'd when first thou didst presume,
Thou hadst not lived to kill a son of mine....

71

V,6,3055

Ay, and for much more slaughter after this.
God forgive my sins, and pardon thee!

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