Speeches (Lines) for Henry VI
in "Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 82

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,21

Suffolk, arise. Welcome, Queen Margaret:
I can express no kinder sign of love...

2

I,1,36

Her sight did ravish; but her grace in speech,
Her words y-clad with wisdom's majesty,...

3

I,1,59

Uncle, how now!

4

I,1,63

Uncle of Winchester, I pray, read on.

5

I,1,69

They please us well. Lord marquess, kneel down:
We here create thee the first duke of Suffolk,...

6

I,3,495

For my part, noble lords, I care not which;
Or Somerset or York, all's one to me.

7

I,3,539

Sweet aunt, be quiet; 'twas against her will.

8

I,3,581

What mean'st thou, Suffolk; tell me, what are these?

9

I,3,587

Say, man, were these thy words?

10

I,3,605

Uncle, what shall we say to this in law?

11

I,3,620

Away with them to prison; and the day of combat
shall be the last of the next month. Come,...

12

II,1,731

But what a point, my lord, your falcon made,
And what a pitch she flew above the rest!...

13

II,1,744

The treasury of everlasting joy.

14

II,1,760

I prithee, peace, good queen,
And whet not on these furious peers;...

15

II,1,774

How now, my lords!

16

II,1,784

Why, how now, uncle Gloucester!

17

II,1,791

The winds grow high; so do your stomachs, lords.
How irksome is this music to my heart!...

18

II,1,803

Now, God be praised, that to believing souls
Gives light in darkness, comfort in despair!...

19

II,1,810

Great is his comfort in this earthly vale,
Although by his sight his sin be multiplied.

20

II,1,814

Good fellow, tell us here the circumstance,
That we for thee may glorify the Lord....

21

II,1,823

Where wert thou born?

22

II,1,825

Poor soul, God's goodness hath been great to thee:
Let never day nor night unhallow'd pass,...

23

II,1,859

Why, then, thou know'st what colour jet is of?

24

II,1,900

O God, seest Thou this, and bearest so long?

25

II,1,912

What tidings with our cousin Buckingham?

26

II,1,934

O God, what mischiefs work the wicked ones,
Heaping confusion on their own heads thereby!

27

II,1,948

Well, for this night we will repose us here:
To-morrow toward London back again,...

28

II,3,1044

Stand forth, Dame Eleanor Cobham, Gloucester's wife:
In sight of God and us, your guilt is great:...

29

II,3,1066

Stay, Humphrey Duke of Gloucester: ere thou go,
Give up thy staff: Henry will to himself...

30

II,3,1099

O God's name, see the lists and all things fit:
Here let them end it; and God defend the right!

31

II,3,1148

Go, take hence that traitor from our sight;
For his death we do perceive his guilt:...

32

III,1,1278

I muse my Lord of Gloucester is not come:
'Tis not his wont to be the hindmost man,...

33

III,1,1344

My lords, at once: the care you have of us,
To mow down thorns that would annoy our foot,...

34

III,1,1362

Welcome, Lord Somerset. What news from France?

35

III,1,1365

Cold news, Lord Somerset: but God's will be done!

36

III,1,1420

My lord of Gloucester, 'tis my special hope
That you will clear yourself from all suspect:...

37

III,1,1477

My lords, what to your wisdoms seemeth best,
Do or undo, as if ourself were here.

38

III,1,1480

Ay, Margaret; my heart is drown'd with grief,
Whose flood begins to flow within mine eyes,...

39

III,2,1692

Go, call our uncle to our presence straight;
Say we intend to try his grace to-day....

40

III,2,1697

Lords, take your places; and, I pray you all,
Proceed no straiter 'gainst our uncle Gloucester...

41

III,2,1704

I thank thee, Meg; these words content me much.
[Re-enter SUFFOLK]...

42

III,2,1717

O heavenly God!

43

III,2,1720

What, doth my Lord of Suffolk comfort me?
Came he right now to sing a raven's note,...

44

III,2,1753

Ah, woe is me for Gloucester, wretched man!

45

III,2,1812

That he is dead, good Warwick, 'tis too true;
But how he died God knows, not Henry:...

46

III,2,1819

O Thou that judgest all things, stay my thoughts,
My thoughts, that labour to persuade my soul...

47

III,2,1835

That is to see how deep my grave is made;
For with his soul fled all my worldly solace,...

48

III,2,1919

What stronger breastplate than a heart untainted!
Thrice is he armed that hath his quarrel just,...

49

III,2,1927

Why, how now, lords! your wrathful weapons drawn
Here in our presence! dare you be so bold?...

50

III,2,1971

Go, Salisbury, and tell them all from me.
I thank them for their tender loving care;...

51

III,2,1983

Ungentle queen, to call him gentle Suffolk!
No more, I say: if thou dost plead for him,...

52

III,3,2114

How fares my lord? speak, Beaufort, to
thy sovereign.

53

III,3,2119

Ah, what a sign it is of evil life,
Where death's approach is seen so terrible!

54

III,3,2133

O thou eternal Mover of the heavens.
Look with a gentle eye upon this wretch!...

55

III,3,2140

Peace to his soul, if God's good pleasure be!
Lord cardinal, if thou think'st on heaven's bliss,...

56

III,3,2145

Forbear to judge, for we are sinners all.
Close up his eyes and draw the curtain close;...

57

IV,4,2531

I'll send some holy bishop to entreat;
For God forbid so many simple souls...

58

IV,4,2541

Lord Say, Jack Cade hath sworn to have thy head.

59

IV,4,2543

How now, madam!
Still lamenting and mourning for Suffolk's death?...

60

IV,4,2549

How now! what news? why comest thou in such haste?

61

IV,4,2561

O graceless men! they know not what they do.

62

IV,4,2566

Lord Say, the traitors hate thee;
Therefore away with us to Killingworth.

63

IV,4,2579

Come, Margaret; God, our hope, will succor us.

64

IV,4,2581

Farewell, my lord: trust not the Kentish rebels.

65

IV,9,2832

Was ever king that joy'd an earthly throne,
And could command no more content than I?...

66

IV,9,2840

Why, Buckingham, is the traitor Cade surprised?
Or is he but retired to make him strong?...

67

IV,9,2847

Then, heaven, set ope thy everlasting gates,
To entertain my vows of thanks and praise!...

68

IV,9,2866

Thus stands my state, 'twixt Cade and York distress'd.
Like to a ship that, having 'scaped a tempest,...

69

IV,9,2879

In any case, be not too rough in terms;
For he is fierce and cannot brook hard language.

70

IV,9,2883

Come, wife, let's in, and learn to govern better;
For yet may England curse my wretched reign.

71

V,1,3034

Buckingham, doth York intend no harm to us,
That thus he marcheth with thee arm in arm?

72

V,1,3038

Then what intends these forces thou dost bring?

73

V,1,3047

The head of Cade! Great God, how just art Thou!
O, let me view his visage, being dead,...

74

V,1,3052

How art thou call'd? and what is thy degree?

75

V,1,3057

Iden, kneel down.
[He kneels]...

76

V,1,3066

See, Buckingham, Somerset comes with the queen:
Go, bid her hide him quickly from the duke.

77

V,1,3121

Ay, Clifford; a bedlam and ambitious humour
Makes him oppose himself against his king.

78

V,1,3151

Why, Warwick, hath thy knee forgot to bow?
Old Salisbury, shame to thy silver hair,...

79

V,1,3169

Hast thou not sworn allegiance unto me?

80

V,1,3171

Canst thou dispense with heaven for such an oath?

81

V,1,3182

Call Buckingham, and bid him arm himself.

82

V,2,3296

Can we outrun the heavens? good Margaret, stay.

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