Speeches (Lines) for Helena
in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 109

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,51

I do affect a sorrow indeed, but I have it too.

2

I,1,80

O, were that all! I think not on my father;
And these great tears grace his remembrance more...

3

I,1,110

And you, monarch!

4

I,1,112

And no.

5

I,1,114

Ay. You have some stain of soldier in you: let me
ask you a question. Man is enemy to virginity; how...

6

I,1,118

But he assails; and our virginity, though valiant,
in the defence yet is weak: unfold to us some...

7

I,1,123

Bless our poor virginity from underminers and
blowers up! Is there no military policy, how...

8

I,1,136

I will stand for 't a little, though therefore I die a virgin.

9

I,1,152

How might one do, sir, to lose it to her own liking?

10

I,1,166

Not my virginity yet [—]
There shall your master have a thousand loves,...

11

I,1,180

That I wish well. 'Tis pity—

12

I,1,182

That wishing well had not a body in't,
Which might be felt; that we, the poorer born,...

13

I,1,193

Monsieur Parolles, you were born under a charitable star.

14

I,1,195

I especially think, under Mars.

15

I,1,197

The wars have so kept you under that you must needs
be born under Mars.

16

I,1,200

When he was retrograde, I think, rather.

17

I,1,202

You go so much backward when you fight.

18

I,1,204

So is running away, when fear proposes the safety;
but the composition that your valour and fear makes...

19

I,1,218

Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,
Which we ascribe to heaven: the fated sky...

20

I,3,454

What is your pleasure, madam?

21

I,3,457

Mine honourable mistress.

22

I,3,473

That I am not.

23

I,3,475

Pardon, madam;
The Count Rousillon cannot be my brother:...

24

I,3,483

You are my mother, madam; would you were,—
So that my lord your son were not my brother,—...

25

I,3,508

Good madam, pardon me!

26

I,3,510

Your pardon, noble mistress!

27

I,3,512

Do not you love him, madam?

28

I,3,517

Then, I confess,
Here on my knee, before high heaven and you,...

29

I,3,546

Madam, I had.

30

I,3,548

I will tell truth; by grace itself I swear.
You know my father left me some prescriptions...

31

I,3,561

My lord your son made me to think of this;
Else Paris and the medicine and the king...

32

I,3,573

There's something in't,
More than my father's skill, which was the greatest...

33

I,3,582

Ay, madam, knowingly.

34

II,1,707

Ay, my good lord.
Gerard de Narbon was my father;...

35

II,1,711

The rather will I spare my praises towards him:
Knowing him is enough. On's bed of death...

36

II,1,734

My duty then shall pay me for my pains:
I will no more enforce mine office on you....

37

II,1,743

What I can do can do no hurt to try,
Since you set up your rest 'gainst remedy....

38

II,1,757

Inspired merit so by breath is barr'd:
It is not so with Him that all things knows...

39

II,1,770

The great'st grace lending grace
Ere twice the horses of the sun shall bring...

40

II,1,781

Tax of impudence,
A strumpet's boldness, a divulged shame...

41

II,1,798

If I break time, or flinch in property
Of what I spoke, unpitied let me die,...

42

II,1,803

But will you make it even?

43

II,1,805

Then shalt thou give me with thy kingly hand
What husband in thy power I will command:...

44

II,3,952

To each of you one fair and virtuous mistress
Fall, when Love please! marry, to each, but one!

45

II,3,959

Gentlemen,
Heaven hath through me restored the king to health.

46

II,3,962

I am a simple maid, and therein wealthiest,
That I protest I simply am a maid....

47

II,3,971

Now, Dian, from thy altar do I fly,
And to imperial Love, that god most high,...

48

II,3,975

Thanks, sir; all the rest is mute.

49

II,3,978

The honour, sir, that flames in your fair eyes,
Before I speak, too threateningly replies:...

50

II,3,983

My wish receive,
Which great Love grant! and so, I take my leave.

51

II,3,988

Be not afraid that I your hand should take;
I'll never do you wrong for your own sake:...

52

II,3,995

You are too young, too happy, and too good,
To make yourself a son out of my blood.

53

II,3,1001

[To BERTRAM] I dare not say I take you; but I give
Me and my service, ever whilst I live,...

54

II,3,1048

That you are well restored, my lord, I'm glad:
Let the rest go.

55

II,4,1205

My mother greets me kindly; is she well?

56

II,4,1210

If she be very well, what does she ail, that she's
not very well?

57

II,4,1213

What two things?

58

II,4,1219

I hope, sir, I have your good will to have mine own
good fortunes.

59

II,4,1250

What's his will else?

60

II,4,1255

What more commands he?

61

II,4,1258

In every thing I wait upon his will.

62

II,4,1260

I pray you.
[Exit PAROLLES]...

63

II,5,1318

I have, sir, as I was commanded from you,
Spoke with the king and have procured his leave...

64

II,5,1338

Sir, I can nothing say,
But that I am your most obedient servant.

65

II,5,1341

And ever shall
With true observance seek to eke out that...

66

II,5,1347

Pray, sir, your pardon.

67

II,5,1349

I am not worthy of the wealth I owe,
Nor dare I say 'tis mine, and yet it is;...

68

II,5,1354

Something; and scarce so much: nothing, indeed.
I would not tell you what I would, my lord:...

69

II,5,1359

I shall not break your bidding, good my lord.

70

III,2,1446

Madam, my lord is gone, for ever gone.

71

III,2,1456

Look on his letter, madam; here's my passport.
[Reads]...

72

III,2,1478

[Reads] Till I have no wife I have nothing in France.
'Tis bitter.

73

III,2,1481

Ay, madam.

74

III,2,1509

'Till I have no wife, I have nothing in France.'
Nothing in France, until he has no wife!...

75

III,5,1641

To Saint Jaques le Grand.
Where do the palmers lodge, I do beseech you?

76

III,5,1644

Is this the way?

77

III,5,1653

Is it yourself?

78

III,5,1655

I thank you, and will stay upon your leisure.

79

III,5,1657

I did so.

80

III,5,1660

His name, I pray you.

81

III,5,1662

But by the ear, that hears most nobly of him:
His face I know not.

82

III,5,1668

Ay, surely, mere the truth: I know his lady.

83

III,5,1671

What's his name?

84

III,5,1673

O, I believe with him,
In argument of praise, or to the worth...

85

III,5,1685

How do you mean?
May be the amorous count solicits her...

86

III,5,1699

Which is the Frenchman?

87

III,5,1704

I like him well.

88

III,5,1708

Which is he?

89

III,5,1710

Perchance he's hurt i' the battle.

90

III,5,1720

I humbly thank you:
Please it this matron and this gentle maid...

91

III,7,1847

If you misdoubt me that I am not she,
I know not how I shall assure you further,...

92

III,7,1854

Nor would I wish you.
First, give me trust, the count he is my husband,...

93

III,7,1863

Take this purse of gold,
And let me buy your friendly help thus far,...

94

III,7,1880

You see it lawful, then: it is no more,
But that your daughter, ere she seems as won,...

95

III,7,1895

Why then to-night
Let us assay our plot; which, if it speed,...

96

IV,4,2423

That you may well perceive I have not wrong'd you,
One of the greatest in the Christian world...

97

IV,4,2440

Nor you, mistress,
Ever a friend whose thoughts more truly labour...

98

IV,4,2456

Yet, I pray you:
But with the word the time will bring on summer,...

99

V,1,2566

But this exceeding posting day and night
Must wear your spirits low; we cannot help it:...

100

V,1,2576

Sir, I have seen you in the court of France.

101

V,1,2578

I do presume, sir, that you are not fallen
From the report that goes upon your goodness;...

102

V,1,2585

That it will please you
To give this poor petition to the king,...

103

V,1,2590

Not here, sir!

104

V,1,2595

ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL yet,
Though time seem so adverse and means unfit....

105

V,1,2600

I do beseech you, sir,
Since you are like to see the king before me,...

106

V,1,2608

And you shall find yourself to be well thank'd,
Whate'er falls more. We must to horse again....

107

V,3,3026

No, my good lord;
'Tis but the shadow of a wife you see,...

108

V,3,3030

O my good lord, when I was like this maid,
I found you wondrous kind. There is your ring;...

109

V,3,3038

If it appear not plain and prove untrue,
Deadly divorce step between me and you!...

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