Speeches (Lines) for Duke of Gloucester
in "Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 69

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,49

[Reads] 'Imprimis, it is agreed between the French
king Charles, and William de la Pole, Marquess of...

2

I,1,60

Pardon me, gracious lord;
Some sudden qualm hath struck me at the heart...

3

I,1,82

Brave peers of England, pillars of the state,
To you Duke Humphrey must unload his grief,...

4

I,1,114

Ay, uncle, we will keep it, if we can;
But now it is impossible we should:...

5

I,1,139

A proper jest, and never heard before,
That Suffolk should demand a whole fifteenth...

6

I,1,146

My Lord of Winchester, I know your mind;
'Tis not my speeches that you do mislike,...

7

I,2,290

O Nell, sweet Nell, if thou dost love thy lord,
Banish the canker of ambitious thoughts....

8

I,2,298

Methought this staff, mine office-badge in court,
Was broke in twain; by whom I have forgot,...

9

I,2,314

Nay, Eleanor, then must I chide outright:
Presumptuous dame, ill-nurtured Eleanor,...

10

I,2,328

Nay, be not angry; I am pleased again.

11

I,2,333

I go. Come, Nell, thou wilt ride with us?

12

I,3,510

Madam, the king is old enough himself
To give his censure: these are no women's matters.

13

I,3,514

Madam, I am protector of the realm;
And, at his pleasure, will resign my place.

14

I,3,551

Now, lords, my choler being over-blown
With walking once about the quadrangle,...

15

I,3,606

This doom, my lord, if I may judge:
Let Somerset be regent over the French,...

16

I,3,619

Sirrah, or you must fight, or else be hang'd.

17

II,1,739

My lord, 'tis but a base ignoble mind
That mounts no higher than a bird can soar.

18

II,1,742

Ay, my lord cardinal? how think you by that?
Were it not good your grace could fly to heaven?

19

II,1,749

What, cardinal, is your priesthood grown peremptory?
Tantaene animis coelestibus irae?...

20

II,1,755

As who, my lord?

21

II,1,758

Why, Suffolk, England knows thine insolence.

22

II,1,765

[Aside to CARDINAL] Faith, holy uncle, would
'twere come to that!

23

II,1,768

[Aside to CARDINAL] Make up no factious
numbers for the matter;...

24

II,1,780

True, uncle.

25

II,1,783

[Aside to CARDINAL] Cardinal, I am with you.

26

II,1,785

Talking of hawking; nothing else, my lord.
[Aside to CARDINAL]...

27

II,1,796

What means this noise?
Fellow, what miracle dost thou proclaim?

28

II,1,812

Stand by, my masters: bring him near the king;
His highness' pleasure is to talk with him.

29

II,1,821

Hadst thou been his mother, thou couldst have
better told.

30

II,1,841

How long hast thou been blind?

31

II,1,843

What, and wouldst climb a tree?

32

II,1,846

Mass, thou lovedst plums well, that wouldst
venture so.

33

II,1,850

A subtle knave! but yet it shall not serve.
Let me see thine eyes: wink now: now open them:...

34

II,1,855

Say'st thou me so? What colour is this cloak of?

35

II,1,857

Why, that's well said. What colour is my gown of?

36

II,1,861

But cloaks and gowns, before this day, a many.

37

II,1,863

Tell me, sirrah, what's my name?

38

II,1,865

What's his name?

39

II,1,867

Nor his?

40

II,1,869

What's thine own name?

41

II,1,871

Then, Saunder, sit there, the lyingest knave in
Christendom. If thou hadst been born blind, thou...

42

II,1,881

My masters of Saint Alban's, have you not beadles in
your town, and things called whips?

43

II,1,884

Then send for one presently.

44

II,1,887

Now fetch me a stool hither by and by. Now, sirrah,
if you mean to save yourself from whipping, leap me...

45

II,1,893

Well, sir, we must have you find your legs. Sirrah
beadle, whip him till he leap over that same stool.

46

II,1,902

Follow the knave; and take this drab away.

47

II,1,904

Let them be whipped through every market-town, till
they come to Berwick, from whence they came.

48

II,1,909

But you have done more miracles than I;
You made in a day, my lord, whole towns to fly.

49

II,1,930

Ambitious churchman, leave to afflict my heart:
Sorrow and grief have vanquish'd all my powers;...

50

II,1,938

Madam, for myself, to heaven I do appeal,
How I have loved my king and commonweal:...

51

II,3,1058

Eleanor, the law, thou see'st, hath judged thee:
I cannot justify whom the law condemns....

52

II,3,1076

My staff? here, noble Henry, is my staff:
As willingly do I the same resign...

53

II,4,1157

Thus sometimes hath the brightest day a cloud;
And after summer evermore succeeds...

54

II,4,1163

Ten is the hour that was appointed me
To watch the coming of my punish'd duchess:...

55

II,4,1178

No, stir not, for your lives; let her pass by.

56

II,4,1186

Be patient, gentle Nell; forget this grief.

57

II,4,1218

Ah, Nell, forbear! thou aimest all awry;
I must offend before I be attainted;...

58

II,4,1233

And my consent ne'er ask'd herein before!
This is close dealing. Well, I will be there....

59

II,4,1241

Must you, Sir John, protect my lady here?

60

II,4,1243

Entreat her not the worse in that I pray
You use her well: the world may laugh again;...

61

II,4,1248

Witness my tears, I cannot stay to speak.

62

III,1,1373

All happiness unto my lord the king!
Pardon, my liege, that I have stay'd so long.

63

III,1,1378

Well, Suffolk, thou shalt not see me blush
Nor change my countenance for this arrest:...

64

III,1,1387

Is it but thought so? what are they that think it?
I never robb'd the soldiers of their pay,...

65

III,1,1400

I say no more than truth, so help me God!

66

III,1,1404

Why, 'tis well known that, whiles I was
protector,...

67

III,1,1423

Ah, gracious lord, these days are dangerous:
Virtue is choked with foul ambition...

68

III,1,1464

Far truer spoke than meant: I lose, indeed;
Beshrew the winners, for they play'd me false!...

69

III,1,1470

Ah! thus King Henry throws away his crutch
Before his legs be firm to bear his body....

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