Speeches (Lines) for Duke of Gloucester
in "Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 48

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,12

England ne'er had a king until his time.
Virtue he had, deserving to command:...

2

I,1,37

The church! where is it? Had not churchmen pray'd,
His thread of life had not so soon decay'd:...

3

I,1,45

Name not religion, for thou lovest the flesh,
And ne'er throughout the year to church thou go'st...

4

I,1,70

Is Paris lost? is Rouen yielded up?
If Henry were recall'd to life again,...

5

I,1,104

We will not fly, but to our enemies' throats.
Bedford, if thou be slack, I'll fight it out.

6

I,1,175

I'll to the Tower with all the haste I can,
To view the artillery and munition;...

7

I,3,352

I am come to survey the Tower this day:
Since Henry's death, I fear, there is conveyance....

8

I,3,362

Who willed you? or whose will stands but mine?
There's none protector of the realm but I....

9

I,3,369

Lieutenant, is it you whose voice I hear?
Open the gates; here's Gloucester that would enter.

10

I,3,375

Faint-hearted Woodvile, prizest him 'fore me?
Arrogant Winchester, that haughty prelate,...

11

I,3,385

Peel'd priest, dost thou command me to be shut out?

12

I,3,388

Stand back, thou manifest conspirator,
Thou that contrivedst to murder our dead lord;...

13

I,3,396

I will not slay thee, but I'll drive thee back:
Thy scarlet robes as a child's bearing-cloth...

14

I,3,400

What! am I dared and bearded to my face?
Draw, men, for all this privileged place;...

15

I,3,408

Winchester goose, I cry, a rope! a rope!
Now beat them hence; why do you let them stay?...

16

I,3,417

Peace, mayor! thou know'st little of my wrongs:
Here's Beaufort, that regards nor God nor king,...

17

I,3,427

I will not answer thee with words, but blows.

18

I,3,439

Cardinal, I'll be no breaker of the law:
But we shall meet, and break our minds at large.

19

I,3,445

Mayor, farewell: thou dost but what thou mayst.

20

III,1,1228

Presumptuous priest! this place commands my patience,
Or thou shouldst find thou hast dishonour'd me....

21

III,1,1262

As good!
Thou bastard of my grandfather!

22

III,1,1266

Am I not protector, saucy priest?

23

III,1,1268

Yes, as an outlaw in a castle keeps
And useth it to patronage his theft.

24

III,1,1271

Thou art reverent
Touching thy spiritual function, not thy life.

25

III,1,1321

You of my household, leave this peevish broil
And set this unaccustom'd fight aside.

26

III,1,1334

Stay, stay, I say!
And if you love me, as you say you do,...

27

III,1,1350

Compassion on the king commands me stoop;
Or I would see his heart out, ere the priest...

28

III,1,1357

Here, Winchester, I offer thee my hand.

29

III,1,1367

[Aside] Ay, but, I fear me, with a hollow heart.—
See here, my friends and loving countrymen,...

30

III,1,1384

Well urged, my Lord of Warwick: or sweet prince,
And if your grace mark every circumstance,...

31

III,1,1413

Now will it best avail your majesty
To cross the seas and to be crown'd in France:...

32

III,1,1420

Your ships already are in readiness.

33

III,4,1722

Yes, if it please your majesty, my liege.

34

IV,1,1759

Lord bishop, set the crown upon his head.

35

IV,1,1761

Now, governor of Paris, take your oath,
That you elect no other king but him;...

36

IV,1,1790

To say the truth, this fact was infamous
And ill beseeming any common man,...

37

IV,1,1811

What means his grace, that he hath changed his style?
No more but, plain and bluntly, 'To the king!'...

38

IV,1,1828

He doth, my lord, and is become your foe.

39

IV,1,1830

It is the worst, and all, my lord, he writes.

40

IV,1,1888

Confirm it so! Confounded be your strife!
And perish ye, with your audacious prate!...

41

V,1,2358

I have, my lord: and their intent is this:
They humbly sue unto your excellence...

42

V,1,2363

Well, my good lord; and as the only means
To stop effusion of our Christian blood...

43

V,1,2370

Beside, my lord, the sooner to effect
And surer bind this knot of amity,...

44

V,1,2397

And for the proffer of my lord your master,
I have inform'd his highness so at large...

45

V,5,2878

So should I give consent to flatter sin.
You know, my lord, your highness is betroth'd...

46

V,5,2889

Why, what, I pray, is Margaret more than that?
Her father is no better than an earl,...

47

V,5,2897

And so the Earl of Armagnac may do,
Because he is near kinsman unto Charles.

48

V,5,2956

Ay, grief, I fear me, both at first and last.

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