Speeches (Lines) for George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence)
in "Richard III"

Total: 33

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# Act, Scene, Line
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Speech text

1

I,1,47

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York;
And all the clouds that lour'd upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths;
Our bruised arms hung up for monuments;
Our stern alarums changed to merry meetings,
Our dreadful marches to delightful measures.
Grim-visaged war hath smooth'd his wrinkled front;
And now, instead of mounting barded steeds
To fright the souls of fearful adversaries,
He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber
To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.
But I, that am not shaped for sportive tricks,
Nor made to court an amorous looking-glass;
I, that am rudely stamp'd, and want love's majesty
To strut before a wanton ambling nymph;
I, that am curtail'd of this fair proportion,
Cheated of feature by dissembling nature,
Deformed, unfinish'd, sent before my time
Into this breathing world, scarce half made up,
And that so lamely and unfashionable
That dogs bark at me as I halt by them;
Why, I, in this weak piping time of peace,
Have no delight to pass away the time,
Unless to spy my shadow in the sun
And descant on mine own deformity:
And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover,
To entertain these fair well-spoken days,
I am determined to prove a villain
And hate the idle pleasures of these days.
Plots have I laid, inductions dangerous,
By drunken prophecies, libels and dreams,
To set my brother Clarence and the king
In deadly hate the one against the other:
And if King Edward be as true and just
As I am subtle, false and treacherous,
This day should Clarence closely be mew'd up,
About a prophecy, which says that 'G'
Of Edward's heirs the murderer shall be.
Dive, thoughts, down to my soul: here
Clarence comes.
[Enter CLARENCE, guarded, and BRAKENBURY]
Brother, good day; what means this armed guard
That waits upon your grace?

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). His majesty
Tendering my person's safety, hath appointed
This conduct to convey me to the Tower.


2

I,1,51

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Upon what cause?

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Because my name is George.


3

I,1,57

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Alack, my lord, that fault is none of yours;
He should, for that, commit your godfathers:
O, belike his majesty hath some intent
That you shall be new-christen'd in the Tower.
But what's the matter, Clarence? may I know?

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Yea, Richard, when I know; for I protest
As yet I do not: but, as I can learn,
He hearkens after prophecies and dreams;
And from the cross-row plucks the letter G.
And says a wizard told him that by G
His issue disinherited should be;
And, for my name of George begins with G,
It follows in his thought that I am he.
These, as I learn, and such like toys as these
Have moved his highness to commit me now.


4

I,1,76

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Why, this it is, when men are ruled by women:
'Tis not the king that sends you to the Tower:
My Lady Grey his wife, Clarence, 'tis she
That tempers him to this extremity.
Was it not she and that good man of worship,
Anthony Woodville, her brother there,
That made him send Lord Hastings to the Tower,
From whence this present day he is deliver'd?
We are not safe, Clarence; we are not safe.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). By heaven, I think there's no man is secure
But the queen's kindred and night-walking heralds
That trudge betwixt the king and Mistress Shore.
Heard ye not what an humble suppliant
Lord hastings was to her for his delivery?


5

I,1,110

Sir Robert Brakenbury. I beseech your grace to pardon me, and withal
Forbear your conference with the noble duke.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). We know thy charge, Brakenbury, and will obey.


6

I,1,118

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). We are the queen's abjects, and must obey.
Brother, farewell: I will unto the king;
And whatsoever you will employ me in,
Were it to call King Edward's widow sister,
I will perform it to enfranchise you.
Meantime, this deep disgrace in brotherhood
Touches me deeper than you can imagine.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). I know it pleaseth neither of us well.


7

I,1,121

Richard III (Duke of Gloucester). Well, your imprisonment shall not be long;
Meantime, have patience.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). I must perforce. Farewell.


8

I,4,835

Sir Robert Brakenbury. Why looks your grace so heavily today?

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). O, I have pass'd a miserable night,
So full of ugly sights, of ghastly dreams,
That, as I am a Christian faithful man,
I would not spend another such a night,
Though 'twere to buy a world of happy days,
So full of dismal terror was the time!


9

I,4,842

Sir Robert Brakenbury. What was your dream? I long to hear you tell it.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Methoughts that I had broken from the Tower,
And was embark'd to cross to Burgundy;
And, in my company, my brother Gloucester;
Who from my cabin tempted me to walk
Upon the hatches: thence we looked toward England,
And cited up a thousand fearful times,
During the wars of York and Lancaster
That had befall'n us. As we paced along
Upon the giddy footing of the hatches,
Methought that Gloucester stumbled; and, in falling,
Struck me, that thought to stay him, overboard,
Into the tumbling billows of the main.
Lord, Lord! methought, what pain it was to drown!
What dreadful noise of waters in mine ears!
What ugly sights of death within mine eyes!
Methought I saw a thousand fearful wrecks;
Ten thousand men that fishes gnaw'd upon;
Wedges of gold, great anchors, heaps of pearl,
Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels,
All scatter'd in the bottom of the sea:
Some lay in dead men's skulls; and, in those holes
Where eyes did once inhabit, there were crept,
As 'twere in scorn of eyes, reflecting gems,
Which woo'd the slimy bottom of the deep,
And mock'd the dead bones that lay scatter'd by.


10

I,4,869

Sir Robert Brakenbury. Had you such leisure in the time of death
To gaze upon the secrets of the deep?

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Methought I had; and often did I strive
To yield the ghost: but still the envious flood
Kept in my soul, and would not let it forth
To seek the empty, vast and wandering air;
But smother'd it within my panting bulk,
Which almost burst to belch it in the sea.


11

I,4,876

Sir Robert Brakenbury. Awaked you not with this sore agony?

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). O, no, my dream was lengthen'd after life;
O, then began the tempest to my soul,
Who pass'd, methought, the melancholy flood,
With that grim ferryman which poets write of,
Unto the kingdom of perpetual night.
The first that there did greet my stranger soul,
Was my great father-in-law, renowned Warwick;
Who cried aloud, 'What scourge for perjury
Can this dark monarchy afford false Clarence?'
And so he vanish'd: then came wandering by
A shadow like an angel, with bright hair
Dabbled in blood; and he squeak'd out aloud,
'Clarence is come; false, fleeting, perjured Clarence,
That stabb'd me in the field by Tewksbury;
Seize on him, Furies, take him to your torments!'
With that, methoughts, a legion of foul fiends
Environ'd me about, and howled in mine ears
Such hideous cries, that with the very noise
I trembling waked, and for a season after
Could not believe but that I was in hell,
Such terrible impression made the dream.


12

I,4,899

Sir Robert Brakenbury. No marvel, my lord, though it affrighted you;
I promise, I am afraid to hear you tell it.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). O Brakenbury, I have done those things,
Which now bear evidence against my soul,
For Edward's sake; and see how he requites me!
O God! if my deep prayers cannot appease thee,
But thou wilt be avenged on my misdeeds,
Yet execute thy wrath in me alone,
O, spare my guiltless wife and my poor children!
I pray thee, gentle keeper, stay by me;
My soul is heavy, and I fain would sleep.


13

I,4,988

Second Murderer. No, first let's reason with him.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Where art thou, keeper? give me a cup of wine.


14

I,4,990

Second Murderer. You shall have wine enough, my lord, anon.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). In God's name, what art thou?


15

I,4,992

Second Murderer. A man, as you are.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). But not, as I am, royal.


16

I,4,994

Second Murderer. Nor you, as we are, loyal.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Thy voice is thunder, but thy looks are humble.


17

I,4,996

Second Murderer. My voice is now the king's, my looks mine own.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). How darkly and how deadly dost thou speak!
Your eyes do menace me: why look you pale?
Who sent you hither? Wherefore do you come?


18

I,4,1000

Both. To, to, to—

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). To murder me?


19

I,4,1002

Both. Ay, ay.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). You scarcely have the hearts to tell me so,
And therefore cannot have the hearts to do it.
Wherein, my friends, have I offended you?


20

I,4,1006

First Murderer. Offended us you have not, but the king.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). I shall be reconciled to him again.


21

I,4,1008

Second Murderer. Never, my lord; therefore prepare to die.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Are you call'd forth from out a world of men
To slay the innocent? What is my offence?
Where are the evidence that do accuse me?
What lawful quest have given their verdict up
Unto the frowning judge? or who pronounced
The bitter sentence of poor Clarence' death?
Before I be convict by course of law,
To threaten me with death is most unlawful.
I charge you, as you hope to have redemption
By Christ's dear blood shed for our grievous sins,
That you depart and lay no hands on me
The deed you undertake is damnable.


22

I,4,1022

Second Murderer. And he that hath commanded is the king.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Erroneous vassal! the great King of kings
Hath in the tables of his law commanded
That thou shalt do no murder: and wilt thou, then,
Spurn at his edict and fulfil a man's?
Take heed; for he holds vengeance in his hands,
To hurl upon their heads that break his law.


23

I,4,1038

First Murderer. How canst thou urge God's dreadful law to us,
When thou hast broke it in so dear degree?

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Alas! for whose sake did I that ill deed?
For Edward, for my brother, for his sake: Why, sirs,
He sends ye not to murder me for this
For in this sin he is as deep as I.
If God will be revenged for this deed.
O, know you yet, he doth it publicly,
Take not the quarrel from his powerful arm;
He needs no indirect nor lawless course
To cut off those that have offended him.


24

I,4,1050

First Murderer. Who made thee, then, a bloody minister,
When gallant-springing brave Plantagenet,
That princely novice, was struck dead by thee?

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). My brother's love, the devil, and my rage.


25

I,4,1053

First Murderer. Thy brother's love, our duty, and thy fault,
Provoke us hither now to slaughter thee.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Oh, if you love my brother, hate not me;
I am his brother, and I love him well.
If you be hired for meed, go back again,
And I will send you to my brother Gloucester,
Who shall reward you better for my life
Than Edward will for tidings of my death.


26

I,4,1060

Second Murderer. You are deceived, your brother Gloucester hates you.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). O, no, he loves me, and he holds me dear:
Go you to him from me.


27

I,4,1063

Both. Ay, so we will.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Tell him, when that our princely father York
Bless'd his three sons with his victorious arm,
And charged us from his soul to love each other,
He little thought of this divided friendship:
Bid Gloucester think of this, and he will weep.


28

I,4,1069

First Murderer. Ay, millstones; as be lesson'd us to weep.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). O, do not slander him, for he is kind.


29

I,4,1073

First Murderer. Right,
As snow in harvest. Thou deceivest thyself:
'Tis he that sent us hither now to slaughter thee.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). It cannot be; for when I parted with him,
He hugg'd me in his arms, and swore, with sobs,
That he would labour my delivery.


30

I,4,1079

First Murderer. Make peace with God, for you must die, my lord.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Hast thou that holy feeling in thy soul,
To counsel me to make my peace with God,
And art thou yet to thy own soul so blind,
That thou wilt war with God by murdering me?
Ah, sirs, consider, he that set you on
To do this deed will hate you for the deed.


31

I,4,1086

Second Murderer. What shall we do?

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Relent, and save your souls.


32

I,4,1088

First Murderer. Relent! 'tis cowardly and womanish.

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). Not to relent is beastly, savage, devilish.
Which of you, if you were a prince's son,
Being pent from liberty, as I am now,
if two such murderers as yourselves came to you,
Would not entreat for life?
My friend, I spy some pity in thy looks:
O, if thine eye be not a flatterer,
Come thou on my side, and entreat for me,
As you would beg, were you in my distress
A begging prince what beggar pities not?


33

V,3,3612

(stage directions). [Enter the Ghost of CLARENCE]

George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence). [To KING RICHARD III]
Let me sit heavy on thy soul to-morrow!
I, that was wash'd to death with fulsome wine,
Poor Clarence, by thy guile betrayed to death!
To-morrow in the battle think on me,
And fall thy edgeless sword: despair, and die!—
[To RICHMOND]
Thou offspring of the house of Lancaster
The wronged heirs of York do pray for thee
Good angels guard thy battle! live, and flourish!


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