Speeches (Lines) for George Plantagenet (Duke of Clarence)
in "Henry VI, Part III"

Total: 39

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,1008

But when we saw our sunshine made thy spring,
And that thy summer bred us no increase,...

2

II,3,1036

Our hap is loss, our hope but sad despair;
Our ranks are broke, and ruin follows us:...

3

II,3,1077

Yet let us all together to our troops,
And give them leave to fly that will not stay;...

4

II,6,1321

If so thou think'st, vex him with eager words.

5

II,6,1325

While we devise fell tortures for thy faults.

6

II,6,1328

Where's Captain Margaret, to fence you now?

7

III,2,1484

[Aside to GLOUCESTER] He knows the game: how true
he keeps the wind!

8

III,2,1496

[Aside to GLOUCESTER] I fear her not, unless she
chance to fall.

9

III,2,1501

[Aside to GLOUCESTER] I think he means to beg a
child of her.

10

III,2,1531

[Aside to GLOUCESTER] As red as fire! nay, then
her wax must melt.

11

III,2,1566

[Aside to GLOUCESTER] He is the bluntest wooer in
Christendom.

12

III,2,1593

[Aside to GLOUCESTER] When he was made a shriver,
'twas for shift.

13

III,2,1598

To whom, my lord?

14

III,2,1601

That's a day longer than a wonder lasts.

15

IV,1,1977

Alas, you know, 'tis far from hence to France;
How could he stay till Warwick made return?

16

IV,1,1981

I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
[Flourish. Enter KING EDWARD IV, attended; QUEEN]...

17

IV,1,1986

As well as Lewis of France, or the Earl of Warwick,
Which are so weak of courage and in judgment...

18

IV,1,2004

Then this is mine opinion: that King Lewis
Becomes your enemy, for mocking him...

19

IV,1,2022

For this one speech Lord Hastings well deserves
To have the heir of the Lord Hungerford.

20

IV,1,2031

Or else you would not have bestow'd the heir
Of the Lord Bonville on your new wife's son,...

21

IV,1,2036

In choosing for yourself, you show'd your judgment,
Which being shallow, you give me leave...

22

IV,1,2095

Belike the elder; Clarence will have the younger.
Now, brother king, farewell, and sit you fast,...

23

IV,2,2136

Fear not that, my lord.

24

IV,6,2346

No, Warwick, thou art worthy of the sway,
To whom the heavens in thy nativity...

25

IV,6,2360

That he consents, if Warwick yield consent;
For on thy fortune I repose myself.

26

IV,6,2370

What else? and that succession be determined.

27

IV,6,2378

It shall be done, my sovereign, with all speed.

28

IV,8,2528

A little fire is quickly trodden out;
Which, being suffer'd, rivers cannot quench.

29

IV,8,2547

In sign of truth, I kiss your highness' hand.

30

V,1,2684

Father of Warwick, know you what this means?
[Taking his red rose out of his hat]...

31

V,3,2787

A little gale will soon disperse that cloud
And blow it to the source from whence it came:...

32

V,5,2927

Untutor'd lad, thou art too malapert.

33

V,5,2937

And there's for twitting me with perjury.

34

V,5,2948

What? what?

35

V,5,2972

By heaven, I will not do thee so much ease.

36

V,5,2974

Didst thou not hear me swear I would not do it?

37

V,5,2985

To London, all in post; and, as I guess,
To make a bloody supper in the Tower.

38

V,7,3123

The duty that I owe unto your majesty
I seal upon the lips of this sweet babe.

39

V,7,3132

What will your grace have done with Margaret?
Reignier, her father, to the king of France...

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