Speeches (Lines) for Gardiner
in "Henry VIII"

Total: 22

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,2,1166

Cardinal Wolsey. [Aside to GARDINER] Give me your hand much joy and
favour to you;
You are the king's now.

Gardiner. [Aside to CARDINAL WOLSEY]
But to be commanded
For ever by your grace, whose hand has raised me.


2

V,1,2777

(stage directions). [Enter GARDINER, Bishop of Winchester, a Page with a]
torch before him, met by LOVELL]

Gardiner. It's one o'clock, boy, is't not?


3

V,1,2779

Page. It hath struck.

Gardiner. These should be hours for necessities,
Not for delights; times to repair our nature
With comforting repose, and not for us
To waste these times. Good hour of night, Sir Thomas!
Whither so late?


4

V,1,2785

Sir Thomas Lovell. Came you from the king, my lord

Gardiner. I did, Sir Thomas: and left him at primero
With the Duke of Suffolk.


5

V,1,2789

Sir Thomas Lovell. I must to him too,
Before he go to bed. I'll take my leave.

Gardiner. Not yet, Sir Thomas Lovell. What's the matter?
It seems you are in haste: an if there be
No great offence belongs to't, give your friend
Some touch of your late business: affairs, that walk,
As they say spirits do, at midnight, have
In them a wilder nature than the business
That seeks dispatch by day.


6

V,1,2801

Sir Thomas Lovell. My lord, I love you;
And durst commend a secret to your ear
Much weightier than this work. The queen's in labour,
They say, in great extremity; and fear'd
She'll with the labour end.

Gardiner. The fruit she goes with
I pray for heartily, that it may find
Good time, and live: but for the stock, Sir Thomas,
I wish it grubb'd up now.


7

V,1,2809

Sir Thomas Lovell. Methinks I could
Cry the amen; and yet my conscience says
She's a good creature, and, sweet lady, does
Deserve our better wishes.

Gardiner. But, sir, sir,
Hear me, Sir Thomas: you're a gentleman
Of mine own way; I know you wise, religious;
And, let me tell you, it will ne'er be well,
'Twill not, Sir Thomas Lovell, take't of me,
Till Cranmer, Cromwell, her two hands, and she,
Sleep in their graves.


8

V,1,2824

Sir Thomas Lovell. Now, sir, you speak of two
The most remark'd i' the kingdom. As for Cromwell,
Beside that of the jewel house, is made master
O' the rolls, and the king's secretary; further, sir,
Stands in the gap and trade of moe preferments,
With which the time will load him. The archbishop
Is the king's hand and tongue; and who dare speak
One syllable against him?

Gardiner. Yes, yes, Sir Thomas,
There are that dare; and I myself have ventured
To speak my mind of him: and indeed this day,
Sir, I may tell it you, I think I have
Incensed the lords o' the council, that he is,
For so I know he is, they know he is,
A most arch heretic, a pestilence
That does infect the land: with which they moved
Have broken with the king; who hath so far
Given ear to our complaint, of his great grace
And princely care foreseeing those fell mischiefs
Our reasons laid before him, hath commanded
To-morrow morning to the council-board
He be convented. He's a rank weed, Sir Thomas,
And we must root him out. From your affairs
I hinder you too long: good night, Sir Thomas.


9

V,3,3056

Cromwell. Please your honours,
The chief cause concerns his grace of Canterbury.

Gardiner. Has he had knowledge of it?


10

V,3,3060

Keeper. Without, my noble lords?

Gardiner. Yes.


11

V,3,3078

Lord Chancellor. My good lord archbishop, I'm very sorry
To sit here at this present, and behold
That chair stand empty: but we all are men,
In our own natures frail, and capable
Of our flesh; few are angels: out of which frailty
And want of wisdom, you, that best should teach us,
Have misdemean'd yourself, and not a little,
Toward the king first, then his laws, in filling
The whole realm, by your teaching and your chaplains,
For so we are inform'd, with new opinions,
Divers and dangerous; which are heresies,
And, not reform'd, may prove pernicious.

Gardiner. Which reformation must be sudden too,
My noble lords; for those that tame wild horses
Pace 'em not in their hands to make 'em gentle,
But stop their mouths with stubborn bits, and spur 'em,
Till they obey the manage. If we suffer,
Out of our easiness and childish pity
To one man's honour, this contagious sickness,
Farewell all physic: and what follows then?
Commotions, uproars, with a general taint
Of the whole state: as, of late days, our neighbours,
The upper Germany, can dearly witness,
Yet freshly pitied in our memories.


12

V,3,3110

Duke of Suffolk. Nay, my lord,
That cannot be: you are a counsellor,
And, by that virtue, no man dare accuse you.

Gardiner. My lord, because we have business of more moment,
We will be short with you. 'Tis his highness' pleasure,
And our consent, for better trial of you,
From hence you be committed to the Tower;
Where, being but a private man again,
You shall know many dare accuse you boldly,
More than, I fear, you are provided for.


13

V,3,3129

Archbishop Cranmer. Ah, my good Lord of Winchester, I thank you;
You are always my good friend; if your will pass,
I shall both find your lordship judge and juror,
You are so merciful: I see your end;
'Tis my undoing: love and meekness, lord,
Become a churchman better than ambition:
Win straying souls with modesty again,
Cast none away. That I shall clear myself,
Lay all the weight ye can upon my patience,
I make as little doubt, as you do conscience
In doing daily wrongs. I could say more,
But reverence to your calling makes me modest.

Gardiner. My lord, my lord, you are a sectary,
That's the plain truth: your painted gloss discovers,
To men that understand you, words and weakness.


14

V,3,3137

Cromwell. My Lord of Winchester, you are a little,
By your good favour, too sharp; men so noble,
However faulty, yet should find respect
For what they have been: 'tis a cruelty
To load a falling man.

Gardiner. Good master secretary,
I cry your honour mercy; you may, worst
Of all this table, say so.


15

V,3,3141

Cromwell. Why, my lord?

Gardiner. Do not I know you for a favourer
Of this new sect? ye are not sound.


16

V,3,3144

Cromwell. Not sound?

Gardiner. Not sound, I say.


17

V,3,3147

Cromwell. Would you were half so honest!
Men's prayers then would seek you, not their fears.

Gardiner. I shall remember this bold language.


18

V,3,3152

Lord Chancellor. This is too much;
Forbear, for shame, my lords.

Gardiner. I have done.


19

V,3,3162

Archbishop Cranmer. Is there no other way of mercy,
But I must needs to the Tower, my lords?

Gardiner. What other
Would you expect? you are strangely troublesome.
Let some o' the guard be ready there.


20

V,3,3168

Archbishop Cranmer. For me?
Must I go like a traitor thither?

Gardiner. Receive him,
And see him safe i' the Tower.


21

V,3,3192

(stage directions). [Enter KING, frowning on them; takes his seat]

Gardiner. Dread sovereign, how much are we bound to heaven
In daily thanks, that gave us such a prince;
Not only good and wise, but most religious:
One that, in all obedience, makes the church
The chief aim of his honour; and, to strengthen
That holy duty, out of dear respect,
His royal self in judgment comes to hear
The cause betwixt her and this great offender.


22

V,3,3255

Henry VIII. Come, come, my lord, you'ld spare your spoons: you
shall have two noble partners with you; the old
Duchess of Norfolk, and Lady Marquess Dorset: will
these please you?
Once more, my Lord of Winchester, I charge you,
Embrace and love this man.

Gardiner. With a true heart
And brother-love I do it.


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