Speeches (Lines) for First Soldier
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 14

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

IV,3,2578

(stage directions). [Enter two Soldiers to their guard]

First Soldier. Brother, good night: to-morrow is the day.


2

IV,3,2581

Second Soldier. It will determine one way: fare you well.
Heard you of nothing strange about the streets?

First Soldier. Nothing. What news?


3

IV,3,2583

Second Soldier. Belike 'tis but a rumour. Good night to you.

First Soldier. Well, sir, good night.


4

IV,3,2595

Fourth Soldier. Peace! what noise?

First Soldier. List, list!


5

IV,3,2597

Second Soldier. Hark!

First Soldier. Music i' the air.


6

IV,3,2601

Third Soldier. No.

First Soldier. Peace, I say!
What should this mean?


7

IV,3,2605

Second Soldier. 'Tis the god Hercules, whom Antony loved,
Now leaves him.

First Soldier. Walk; let's see if other watchmen
Do hear what we do?


8

IV,3,2611

All. [Speaking together] How now!
How now! do you hear this?

First Soldier. Ay; is't not strange?


9

IV,3,2613

Third Soldier. Do you hear, masters? do you hear?

First Soldier. Follow the noise so far as we have quarter;
Let's see how it will give off.


10

IV,9,2832

(stage directions). [Sentinels at their post]

First Soldier. If we be not relieved within this hour,
We must return to the court of guard: the night
Is shiny; and they say we shall embattle
By the second hour i' the morn.


11

IV,9,2846

Domitius Enobarus. Be witness to me, O thou blessed moon,
When men revolted shall upon record
Bear hateful memory, poor Enobarbus did
Before thy face repent!

First Soldier. Enobarbus!


12

IV,9,2863

Second Soldier. Let's speak To him.

First Soldier. Let's hear him, for the things he speaks
May concern Caesar.


13

IV,9,2866

Third Soldier. Let's do so. But he sleeps.

First Soldier. Swoons rather; for so bad a prayer as his
Was never yet for sleep.


14

IV,9,2871

Second Soldier. Hear you, sir?

First Soldier. The hand of death hath raught him.
[Drums afar off]
Hark! the drums
Demurely wake the sleepers. Let us bear him
To the court of guard; he is of note: our hour
Is fully out.


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