Speeches (Lines) for First Senator
in "Timon of Athens"

Total: 27

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,5,1307

My lord, you have my voice to it; the fault's
Bloody; 'tis necessary he should die:
Nothing emboldens sin so much as mercy.

2

III,5,1313

Now, captain?

3

III,5,1331

You undergo too strict a paradox,
Striving to make an ugly deed look fair:
Your words have took such pains as if they labour'd
To bring manslaughter into form and set quarrelling
Upon the head of valour; which indeed
Is valour misbegot and came into the world
When sects and factions were newly born:
He's truly valiant that can wisely suffer
The worst that man can breathe, and make his wrongs
His outsides, to wear them like his raiment,
carelessly,
And ne'er prefer his injuries to his heart,
To bring it into danger.
If wrongs be evils and enforce us kill,
What folly 'tis to hazard life for ill!

4

III,5,1347

You cannot make gross sins look clear:
To revenge is no valour, but to bear.

5

III,5,1372

What's that?

6

III,5,1385

He dies.

7

III,5,1397

We are for law: he dies; urge it no more,
On height of our displeasure: friend or brother,
He forfeits his own blood that spills another.

8

III,5,1409

Do you dare our anger?
'Tis in few words, but spacious in effect;
We banish thee for ever.

9

III,5,1415

If, after two days' shine, Athens contain thee,
Attend our weightier judgment. And, not to swell
our spirit,
He shall be executed presently.

10

V,1,2393

Bring us to his cave:
It is our part and promise to the Athenians
To speak with Timon.

11

V,1,2413

Worthy Timon,—

12

V,1,2415

The senators of Athens greet thee, Timon.

13

V,1,2418

O, forget
What we are sorry for ourselves in thee.
The senators with one consent of love
Entreat thee back to Athens; who have thought
On special dignities, which vacant lie
For thy best use and wearing.

14

V,1,2441

Therefore, so please thee to return with us
And of our Athens, thine and ours, to take
The captainship, thou shalt be met with thanks,
Allow'd with absolute power and thy good name
Live with authority: so soon we shall drive back
Of Alcibiades the approaches wild,
Who, like a boar too savage, doth root up
His country's peace.

15

V,1,2451

Therefore, Timon,—

16

V,1,2476

We speak in vain.

17

V,1,2480

That's well spoke.

18

V,1,2482

These words become your lips as they pass
thorough them.

19

V,1,2493

I like this well; he will return again.

20

V,1,2514

His discontents are unremoveably
Coupled to nature.

21

V,1,2519

It requires swift foot.

22

V,2,2522

Thou hast painfully discover'd: are his files
As full as thy report?

23

V,2,2536

Here come our brothers.

24

V,4,2571

Noble and young,
When thy first griefs were but a mere conceit,
Ere thou hadst power or we had cause of fear,
We sent to thee, to give thy rages balm,
To wipe out our ingratitude with loves
Above their quantity.

25

V,4,2582

These walls of ours
Were not erected by their hands from whom
You have received your griefs; nor are they such
That these great towers, trophies and schools
should fall
For private faults in them.

26

V,4,2598

All have not offended;
For those that were, it is not square to take
On those that are, revenges: crimes, like lands,
Are not inherited. Then, dear countryman,
Bring in thy ranks, but leave without thy rage:
Spare thy Athenian cradle and those kin
Which in the bluster of thy wrath must fall
With those that have offended: like a shepherd,
Approach the fold and cull the infected forth,
But kill not all together.

27

V,4,2611

Set but thy foot
Against our rampired gates, and they shall ope;
So thou wilt send thy gentle heart before,
To say thou'lt enter friendly.

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