Speeches (Lines) for First Lord
in "Timon of Athens"

Total: 28

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,302

What time o' day is't, Apemantus?

2

I,1,304

That time serves still.

3

I,1,313

Hang thyself!

4

I,1,319

He's opposite to humanity. Come, shall we in,
And taste Lord Timon's bounty? he outgoes
The very heart of kindness.

5

I,1,327

The noblest mind he carries
That ever govern'd man.

6

I,1,330

I'll keep you company.

7

I,2,361

My lord, we always have confess'd it.

8

I,2,422

Might we but have that happiness, my lord, that you
would once use our hearts, whereby we might express
some part of our zeals, we should think ourselves
for ever perfect.

9

I,2,473

You see, my lord, how ample you're beloved.
[Music. Re-enter Cupid with a mask of Ladies]
as Amazons, with lutes in their hands,
dancing and playing]

10

I,2,519

Where be our men?

11

I,2,528

I am so far already in your gifts,—

12

I,2,593

We are so virtuously bound—

13

I,2,598

The best of happiness,
Honour and fortunes, keep with you, Lord Timon!

14

III,6,1438

The good time of day to you, sir.

15

III,6,1441

Upon that were my thoughts tiring, when we
encountered: I hope it is not so low with him as
he made it seem in the trial of his several friends.

16

III,6,1445

I should think so: he hath sent me an earnest
inviting, which many my near occasions did urge me
to put off; but he hath conjured me beyond them, and
I must needs appear.

17

III,6,1453

I am sick of that grief too, as I understand how all
things go.

18

III,6,1457

A thousand pieces.

19

III,6,1459

What of you?

20

III,6,1463

Ever at the best, hearing well of your lordship.

21

III,6,1471

I hope it remains not unkindly with your lordship
that I returned you an empty messenger.

22

III,6,1485

Royal cheer, I warrant you.

23

III,6,1488

How do you? What's the news?

24

III,6,1490

[with Second Lord] Alcibiades banished!

25

III,6,1492

How! how!

26

III,6,1549

How now, my lords!

27

III,6,1553

He's but a mad lord, and nought but humour sways him.
He gave me a jewel th' other day, and now he has
beat it out of my hat: did you see my jewel?

28

III,6,1559

Let's make no stay.

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