Speeches (Lines) for First Lord
in "Cymbeline"

Total: 15

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,235

(stage directions). [Enter CLOTEN and two Lords]

First Lord. Sir, I would advise you to shift a shirt; the
violence of action hath made you reek as a
sacrifice: where air comes out, air comes in:
there's none abroad so wholesome as that you vent.


2

I,2,241

Second Lord. [Aside] No, 'faith; not so much as his patience.

First Lord. Hurt him! his body's a passable carcass, if he be
not hurt: it is a thoroughfare for steel, if it be not hurt.


3

I,2,247

Second Lord. [Aside] No; but he fled forward still, toward your face.

First Lord. Stand you! You have land enough of your own: but
he added to your having; gave you some ground.


4

I,2,256

Second Lord. [Aside] If it be a sin to make a true election, she
is damned.

First Lord. Sir, as I told you always, her beauty and her brain
go not together: she's a good sign, but I have seen
small reflection of her wit.


5

I,2,266

Cloten. You'll go with us?

First Lord. I'll attend your lordship.


6

II,1,856

Cloten. Was there ever man had such luck! when I kissed the
jack, upon an up-cast to be hit away! I had a
hundred pound on't: and then a whoreson jackanapes
must take me up for swearing; as if I borrowed mine
oaths of him and might not spend them at my pleasure.

First Lord. What got he by that? You have broke his pate with
your bowl.


7

II,1,883

Cloten. Why, so I say.

First Lord. Did you hear of a stranger that's come to court to-night?


8

II,1,887

Second Lord. [Aside] He's a strange fellow himself, and knows it
not.

First Lord. There's an Italian come; and, 'tis thought, one of
Leonatus' friends.


9

II,1,891

Cloten. Leonatus! a banished rascal; and he's another,
whatsoever he be. Who told you of this stranger?

First Lord. One of your lordship's pages.


10

II,3,978

(stage directions). [Enter CLOTEN and Lords]

First Lord. Your lordship is the most patient man in loss, the
most coldest that ever turned up ace.


11

II,3,981

Cloten. It would make any man cold to lose.

First Lord. But not every man patient after the noble temper of
your lordship. You are most hot and furious when you win.


12

II,3,986

Cloten. Winning will put any man into courage. If I could
get this foolish Imogen, I should have gold enough.
It's almost morning, is't not?

First Lord. Day, my lord.


13

IV,3,2843

Pisanio. Sir, my life is yours;
I humbly set it at your will; but, for my mistress,
I nothing know where she remains, why gone,
Nor when she purposes return. Beseech your highness,
Hold me your loyal servant.

First Lord. Good my liege,
The day that she was missing he was here:
I dare be bound he's true and shall perform
All parts of his subjection loyally. For Cloten,
There wants no diligence in seeking him,
And will, no doubt, be found.


14

IV,3,2853

Cymbeline. The time is troublesome.
[To PISANIO]
We'll slip you for a season; but our jealousy
Does yet depend.

First Lord. So please your majesty,
The Roman legions, all from Gallia drawn,
Are landed on your coast, with a supply
Of Roman gentlemen, by the senate sent.


15

IV,3,2859

Cymbeline. Now for the counsel of my son and queen!
I am amazed with matter.

First Lord. Good my liege,
Your preparation can affront no less
Than what you hear of: come more, for more
you're ready:
The want is but to put those powers in motion
That long to move.


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