Speeches (Lines) for First Lord
in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 48

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,238

So 'tis reported, sir.

2

I,2,245

His love and wisdom,
Approved so to your majesty, may plead
For amplest credence.

3

I,2,258

It is the Count Rousillon, my good lord,
Young Bertram.

4

II,1,598

'Tis our hope, sir,
After well enter'd soldiers, to return
And find your grace in health.

5

II,1,619

O, my sweet lord, that you will stay behind us!

6

II,1,630

There's honour in the theft.

7

II,1,634

Farewell, captain.

8

II,1,643

We shall, noble captain.

9

II,3,974

And grant it.

10

III,1,1373

Holy seems the quarrel
Upon your grace's part; black and fearful
On the opposer.

11

III,1,1388

But I am sure the younger of our nature,
That surfeit on their ease, will day by day
Come here for physic.

12

III,6,1731

If your lordship find him not a hilding, hold me no
more in your respect.

13

III,6,1741

It were fit you knew him; lest, reposing too far in
his virtue, which he hath not, he might at some
great and trusty business in a main danger fail you.

14

III,6,1745

None better than to let him fetch off his drum,
which you hear him so confidently undertake to do.

15

III,6,1759

O, for the love of laughter, let him fetch his drum;
he says he has a stratagem for't: when your
lordship sees the bottom of his success in't, and to
what metal this counterfeit lump of ore will be
melted, if you give him not John Drum's
entertainment, your inclining cannot be removed.
Here he comes.

16

III,6,1772

A pox on't, let it go; 'tis but a drum.

17

III,6,1776

That was not to be blamed in the command of the
service: it was a disaster of war that Caesar
himself could not have prevented, if he had been
there to command.

18

III,6,1816

You do not know him, my lord, as we do: certain it
is that he will steal himself into a man's favour and
for a week escape a great deal of discoveries; but
when you find him out, you have him ever after.

19

III,6,1826

We'll make you some sport with the fox ere we case
him. He was first smoked by the old lord Lafeu:
when his disguise and he is parted, tell me what a
sprat you shall find him; which you shall see this
very night.

20

III,6,1837

But you say she's honest.

21

III,6,1844

With all my heart, my lord.

22

IV,3,2093

You have not given him his mother's letter?

23

IV,3,2097

He has much worthy blame laid upon him for shaking
off so good a wife and so sweet a lady.

24

IV,3,2103

When you have spoken it, 'tis dead, and I am the
grave of it.

25

IV,3,2110

Now, God delay our rebellion! as we are ourselves,
what things are we!

26

IV,3,2117

Is it not meant damnable in us, to be trumpeters of
our unlawful intents? We shall not then have his
company to-night?

27

IV,3,2121

That approaches apace; I would gladly have him see
his company anatomized, that he might take a measure
of his own judgments, wherein so curiously he had
set this counterfeit.

28

IV,3,2127

In the mean time, what hear you of these wars?

29

IV,3,2129

Nay, I assure you, a peace concluded.

30

IV,3,2132

I perceive, by this demand, you are not altogether
of his council.

31

IV,3,2136

Sir, his wife some two months since fled from his
house: her pretence is a pilgrimage to Saint Jaques
le Grand; which holy undertaking with most austere
sanctimony she accomplished; and, there residing the
tenderness of her nature became as a prey to her
grief; in fine, made a groan of her last breath, and
now she sings in heaven.

32

IV,3,2144

The stronger part of it by her own letters, which
makes her story true, even to the point of her
death: her death itself, which could not be her
office to say is come, was faithfully confirmed by
the rector of the place.

33

IV,3,2150

Ay, and the particular confirmations, point from
point, so to the full arming of the verity.

34

IV,3,2153

How mightily sometimes we make us comforts of our losses!

35

IV,3,2158

The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and
ill together: our virtues would be proud, if our
faults whipped them not; and our crimes would
despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues.
[Enter a Messenger]
How now! where's your master?

36

IV,3,2170

They cannot be too sweet for the king's tartness.
Here's his lordship now.
[Enter BERTRAM]
How now, my lord! is't not after midnight?

37

IV,3,2208

Hoodman comes! Portotartarosa

38

IV,3,2214

Boblibindo chicurmurco.

39

IV,3,2227

You're deceived, my lord: this is Monsieur
Parolles, the gallant militarist,—that was his own
phrase,—that had the whole theoric of war in the
knot of his scarf, and the practise in the chape of
his dagger.

40

IV,3,2238

He's very near the truth in this.

41

IV,3,2258

Nothing, but let him have thanks. Demand of him my
condition, and what credit I have with the duke.

42

IV,3,2280

Nay look not so upon me; we shall hear of your
lordship anon.

43

IV,3,2293

Excellently.

44

IV,3,2344

I begin to love him for this.

45

IV,3,2355

He hath out-villained villany so far, that the
rarity redeems him.

46

IV,3,2389

That shall you, and take your leave of all your friends.
[Unblinding him]
So, look about you: know you any here?

47

IV,3,2394

God save you, noble captain.

48

IV,3,2397

Good captain, will you give me a copy of the sonnet
you writ to Diana in behalf of the Count Rousillon?
an I were not a very coward, I'ld compel it of you:
but fare you well.

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