Speeches (Lines) for First Citizen
in "Coriolanus"

Total: 33

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,3

Before we proceed any further, hear me speak.

2

I,1,5

You are all resolved rather to die than to famish?

3

I,1,7

First, you know Caius CORIOLANUS is chief enemy to the people.

4

I,1,9

Let us kill him, and we'll have corn at our own price.
Is't a verdict?

5

I,1,13

We are accounted poor citizens, the patricians good.
What authority surfeits on would relieve us: if they...

6

I,1,26

Very well; and could be content to give him good
report fort, but that he pays himself with being proud.

7

I,1,29

I say unto you, what he hath done famously, he did
it to that end: though soft-conscienced men can be...

8

I,1,36

If I must not, I need not be barren of accusations;
he hath faults, with surplus, to tire in repetition....

9

I,1,42

Soft! who comes here?

10

I,1,46

He's one honest enough: would all the rest were so!

11

I,1,49

Our business is not unknown to the senate; they have
had inkling this fortnight what we intend to do,...

12

I,1,56

We cannot, sir, we are undone already.

13

I,1,71

Care for us! True, indeed! They ne'er cared for us
yet: suffer us to famish, and their store-houses...

14

I,1,85

Well, I'll hear it, sir: yet you must not think to
fob off our disgrace with a tale: but, an 't please...

15

I,1,98

Well, sir, what answer made the belly?

16

I,1,107

Your belly's answer? What!
The kingly-crowned head, the vigilant eye,...

17

I,1,115

Should by the cormorant belly be restrain'd,
Who is the sink o' the body,—

18

I,1,118

The former agents, if they did complain,
What could the belly answer?

19

I,1,123

Ye're long about it.

20

I,1,139

Ay, sir; well, well.

21

I,1,145

It was an answer: how apply you this?

22

I,1,154

I the great toe! why the great toe?

23

I,1,167

We have ever your good word.

24

II,3,1425

Once, if he do require our voices, we ought not to deny him.

25

II,3,1437

And to make us no better thought of, a little help
will serve; for once we stood up about the corn, he...

26

II,3,1507

The price is to ask it kindly.

27

II,3,1598

He has our voices, sir.

28

II,3,1604

No,'tis his kind of speech: he did not mock us.

29

II,3,1662

I twice five hundred and their friends to piece 'em.

30

III,1,2076

He shall well know
The noble tribunes are the people's mouths,...

31

IV,6,3034

Ourselves, our wives, and children, on our knees,
Are bound to pray for you both.

32

IV,6,3189

For mine own part,
When I said, banish him, I said 'twas pity.

33

IV,6,3205

The gods be good to us! Come, masters, let's home.
I ever said we were i' the wrong when we banished...

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