Speeches (Lines) for Faulconbridge
in "King John"

Total: 4

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,62

King John. What art thou?

Faulconbridge. The son and heir to that same Faulconbridge.


2

I,1,101

Philip the Bastard. Because he hath a half-face, like my father.
With half that face would he have all my land:
A half-faced groat five hundred pound a year!

Faulconbridge. My gracious liege, when that my father lived,
Your brother did employ my father much,—


3

I,1,105

Philip the Bastard. Well, sir, by this you cannot get my land:
Your tale must be how he employ'd my mother.

Faulconbridge. And once dispatch'd him in an embassy
To Germany, there with the emperor
To treat of high affairs touching that time.
The advantage of his absence took the king
And in the mean time sojourn'd at my father's;
Where how he did prevail I shame to speak,
But truth is truth: large lengths of seas and shores
Between my father and my mother lay,
As I have heard my father speak himself,
When this same lusty gentleman was got.
Upon his death-bed he by will bequeath'd
His lands to me, and took it on his death
That this my mother's son was none of his;
And if he were, he came into the world
Full fourteen weeks before the course of time.
Then, good my liege, let me have what is mine,
My father's land, as was my father's will.


4

I,1,136

King John. Sirrah, your brother is legitimate;
Your father's wife did after wedlock bear him,
And if she did play false, the fault was hers;
Which fault lies on the hazards of all husbands
That marry wives. Tell me, how if my brother,
Who, as you say, took pains to get this son,
Had of your father claim'd this son for his?
In sooth, good friend, your father might have kept
This calf bred from his cow from all the world;
In sooth he might; then, if he were my brother's,
My brother might not claim him; nor your father,
Being none of his, refuse him: this concludes;
My mother's son did get your father's heir;
Your father's heir must have your father's land.

Faulconbridge. Shall then my father's will be of no force
To dispossess that child which is not his?


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