Speeches (Lines) for Eros
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 27

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,5,1796

There's strange news come, sir.

2

III,5,1798

Caesar and Lepidus have made wars upon Pompey.

3

III,5,1800

Caesar, having made use of him in the wars 'gainst
Pompey, presently denied him rivality; would not let
him partake in the glory of the action: and not
resting here, accuses him of letters he had formerly
wrote to Pompey; upon his own appeal, seizes him: so
the poor third is up, till death enlarge his confine.

4

III,5,1809

He's walking in the garden—thus; and spurns
The rush that lies before him; cries, 'Fool Lepidus!'
And threats the throat of that his officer
That murder'd Pompey.

5

III,5,1814

For Italy and Caesar. More, Domitius;
My lord desires you presently: my news
I might have told hereafter.

6

III,5,1819

Come, sir.

7

III,11,2139

Nay, gentle madam, to him, comfort him.

8

III,11,2144

See you here, sir?

9

III,11,2148

Sir, sir,—

10

III,11,2156

The queen, my lord, the queen.

11

III,11,2160

Most noble sir, arise; the queen approaches:
Her head's declined, and death will seize her, but
Your comfort makes the rescue.

12

III,11,2165

Sir, the queen.

13

IV,4,2634

Briefly, sir.

14

IV,5,2691

Sir, his chests and treasure
He has not with him.

15

IV,7,2770

They are beaten, sir, and our advantage serves
For a fair victory.

16

IV,14,2978

Ay, noble lord.

17

IV,14,2987

Ay, my lord,

18

IV,14,2991

It does, my lord.

19

IV,14,3047

What would my lord?

20

IV,14,3063

The gods withhold me!
Shall I do that which all the Parthian darts,
Though enemy, lost aim, and could not?

21

IV,14,3073

I would not see't.

22

IV,14,3077

O, sir, pardon me!

23

IV,14,3082

Turn from me, then, that noble countenance,
Wherein the worship of the whole world lies.

24

IV,14,3086

My sword is drawn.

25

IV,14,3089

My dear master,
My captain, and my emperor, let me say,
Before I strike this bloody stroke, farewell.

26

IV,14,3093

Farewell, great chief. Shall I strike now?

27

IV,14,3095

Why, there then: thus I do escape the sorrow
Of Antony's death.

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