Speeches (Lines) for Earl Oxford
in "Henry VI, Part III"

Total: 13

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,3,1775

Earl of Warwick. Because thy father Henry did usurp;
And thou no more are prince than she is queen.

Earl Oxford. Then Warwick disannuls great John of Gaunt,
Which did subdue the greatest part of Spain;
And, after John of Gaunt, Henry the Fourth,
Whose wisdom was a mirror to the wisest;
And, after that wise prince, Henry the Fifth,
Who by his prowess conquered all France:
From these our Henry lineally descends.


2

III,3,1789

Earl of Warwick. Oxford, how haps it, in this smooth discourse,
You told not how Henry the Sixth hath lost
All that which Henry Fifth had gotten?
Methinks these peers of France should smile at that.
But for the rest, you tell a pedigree
Of threescore and two years; a silly time
To make prescription for a kingdom's worth.

Earl Oxford. Why, Warwick, canst thou speak against thy liege,
Whom thou obeyed'st thirty and six years,
And not bewray thy treason with a blush?


3

III,3,1795

Earl of Warwick. Can Oxford, that did ever fence the right,
Now buckler falsehood with a pedigree?
For shame! leave Henry, and call Edward king.

Earl Oxford. Call him my king by whose injurious doom
My elder brother, the Lord Aubrey Vere,
Was done to death? and more than so, my father,
Even in the downfall of his mellow'd years,
When nature brought him to the door of death?
No, Warwick, no; while life upholds this arm,
This arm upholds the house of Lancaster.


4

III,3,1869

(stage directions). [They all read their letters]

Earl Oxford. I like it well that our fair queen and mistress
Smiles at her news, while Warwick frowns at his.


5

IV,3,2236

(stage directions). [Exit, guarded]

Earl Oxford. What now remains, my lords, for us to do
But march to London with our soldiers?


6

IV,6,2417

Duke/Earl of Somerset. My lord, I like not of this flight of Edward's;
For doubtless Burgundy will yield him help,
And we shall have more wars before 't be long.
As Henry's late presaging prophecy
Did glad my heart with hope of this young Richmond,
So doth my heart misgive me, in these conflicts
What may befall him, to his harm and ours:
Therefore, Lord Oxford, to prevent the worst,
Forthwith we'll send him hence to Brittany,
Till storms be past of civil enmity.

Earl Oxford. Ay, for if Edward repossess the crown,
'Tis like that Richmond with the rest shall down.


7

IV,8,2550

Marquess of Montague. Comfort, my lord; and so I take my leave.

Earl Oxford. And thus I seal my truth, and bid adieu.


8

V,1,2656

Earl of Warwick. O cheerful colours! see where Oxford comes!

Earl Oxford. Oxford, Oxford, for Lancaster!


9

V,2,2774

(stage directions). [Dies]

Earl Oxford. Away, away, to meet the queen's great power!


10

V,4,2854

Prince Edward. Methinks a woman of this valiant spirit
Should, if a coward heard her speak these words,
Infuse his breast with magnanimity
And make him, naked, foil a man at arms.
I speak not this as doubting any here
For did I but suspect a fearful man
He should have leave to go away betimes,
Lest in our need he might infect another
And make him of like spirit to himself.
If any such be here—as God forbid!—
Let him depart before we need his help.

Earl Oxford. Women and children of so high a courage,
And warriors faint! why, 'twere perpetual shame.
O brave young prince! thy famous grandfather
Doth live again in thee: long mayst thou live
To bear his image and renew his glories!


11

V,4,2867

Messenger. Prepare you, lords, for Edward is at hand.
Ready to fight; therefore be resolute.

Earl Oxford. I thought no less: it is his policy
To haste thus fast, to find us unprovided.


12

V,4,2871

Queen Margaret. This cheers my heart, to see your forwardness.

Earl Oxford. Here pitch our battle; hence we will not budge.
[Flourish and march. Enter KING EDWARD IV, GLOUCESTER,]
CLARENCE, and soldiers]


13

V,5,2898

King Edward IV (Plantagenet). Now here a period of tumultuous broils.
Away with Oxford to Hames Castle straight:
For Somerset, off with his guilty head.
Go, bear them hence; I will not hear them speak.

Earl Oxford. For my part, I'll not trouble thee with words.


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