Speeches (Lines) for Duke of Norfolk
in "Henry VIII"

Total: 48

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,37

Duke of Buckingham. Good morrow, and well met. How have ye done
Since last we saw in France?

Duke of Norfolk. I thank your grace,
Healthful; and ever since a fresh admirer
Of what I saw there.


2

I,1,44

Duke of Buckingham. An untimely ague
Stay'd me a prisoner in my chamber when
Those suns of glory, those two lights of men,
Met in the vale of Andren.

Duke of Norfolk. 'Twixt Guynes and Arde:
I was then present, saw them salute on horseback;
Beheld them, when they lighted, how they clung
In their embracement, as they grew together;
Which had they, what four throned ones could have weigh'd
Such a compounded one?


3

I,1,52

Duke of Buckingham. All the whole time
I was my chamber's prisoner.

Duke of Norfolk. Then you lost
The view of earthly glory: men might say,
Till this time pomp was single, but now married
To one above itself. Each following day
Became the next day's master, till the last
Made former wonders its. To-day the French,
All clinquant, all in gold, like heathen gods,
Shone down the English; and, to-morrow, they
Made Britain India: every man that stood
Show'd like a mine. Their dwarfish pages were
As cherubins, all guilt: the madams too,
Not used to toil, did almost sweat to bear
The pride upon them, that their very labour
Was to them as a painting: now this masque
Was cried incomparable; and the ensuing night
Made it a fool and beggar. The two kings,
Equal in lustre, were now best, now worst,
As presence did present them; him in eye,
Still him in praise: and, being present both
'Twas said they saw but one; and no discerner
Durst wag his tongue in censure. When these suns—
For so they phrase 'em—by their heralds challenged
The noble spirits to arms, they did perform
Beyond thought's compass; that former fabulous story,
Being now seen possible enough, got credit,
That Bevis was believed.


4

I,1,79

Duke of Buckingham. O, you go far.

Duke of Norfolk. As I belong to worship and affect
In honour honesty, the tract of every thing
Would by a good discourser lose some life,
Which action's self was tongue to. All was royal;
To the disposing of it nought rebell'd.
Order gave each thing view; the office did
Distinctly his full function.


5

I,1,89

Duke of Buckingham. Who did guide,
I mean, who set the body and the limbs
Of this great sport together, as you guess?

Duke of Norfolk. One, certes, that promises no element
In such a business.


6

I,1,92

Duke of Buckingham. I pray you, who, my lord?

Duke of Norfolk. All this was order'd by the good discretion
Of the right reverend Cardinal of York.


7

I,1,100

Duke of Buckingham. The devil speed him! no man's pie is freed
From his ambitious finger. What had he
To do in these fierce vanities? I wonder
That such a keech can with his very bulk
Take up the rays o' the beneficial sun
And keep it from the earth.

Duke of Norfolk. Surely, sir,
There's in him stuff that puts him to these ends;
For, being not propp'd by ancestry, whose grace
Chalks successors their way, nor call'd upon
For high feats done to the crown; neither allied
For eminent assistants; but, spider-like,
Out of his self-drawing web, he gives us note,
The force of his own merit makes his way
A gift that heaven gives for him, which buys
A place next to the king.


8

I,1,135

Duke of Buckingham. O, many
Have broke their backs with laying manors on 'em
For this great journey. What did this vanity
But minister communication of
A most poor issue?

Duke of Norfolk. Grievingly I think,
The peace between the French and us not values
The cost that did conclude it.


9

I,1,144

Duke of Buckingham. Every man,
After the hideous storm that follow'd, was
A thing inspired; and, not consulting, broke
Into a general prophecy; That this tempest,
Dashing the garment of this peace, aboded
The sudden breach on't.

Duke of Norfolk. Which is budded out;
For France hath flaw'd the league, and hath attach'd
Our merchants' goods at Bourdeaux.


10

I,1,149

Lord Abergavenny. Is it therefore
The ambassador is silenced?

Duke of Norfolk. Marry, is't.


11

I,1,154

Duke of Buckingham. Why, all this business
Our reverend cardinal carried.

Duke of Norfolk. Like it your grace,
The state takes notice of the private difference
Betwixt you and the cardinal. I advise you—
And take it from a heart that wishes towards you
Honour and plenteous safety—that you read
The cardinal's malice and his potency
Together; to consider further that
What his high hatred would effect wants not
A minister in his power. You know his nature,
That he's revengeful, and I know his sword
Hath a sharp edge: it's long and, 't may be said,
It reaches far, and where 'twill not extend,
Thither he darts it. Bosom up my counsel,
You'll find it wholesome. Lo, where comes that rock
That I advise your shunning.
[Enter CARDINAL WOLSEY, the purse borne before him,]
certain of the Guard, and two Secretaries with
papers. CARDINAL WOLSEY in his passage fixeth his
eye on BUCKINGHAM, and BUCKINGHAM on him, both full
of disdain]


12

I,1,186

Duke of Buckingham. This butcher's cur is venom-mouth'd, and I
Have not the power to muzzle him; therefore best
Not wake him in his slumber. A beggar's book
Outworths a noble's blood.

Duke of Norfolk. What, are you chafed?
Ask God for temperance; that's the appliance only
Which your disease requires.


13

I,1,194

Duke of Buckingham. I read in's looks
Matter against me; and his eye reviled
Me, as his abject object: at this instant
He bores me with some trick: he's gone to the king;
I'll follow and outstare him.

Duke of Norfolk. Stay, my lord,
And let your reason with your choler question
What 'tis you go about: to climb steep hills
Requires slow pace at first: anger is like
A full-hot horse, who being allow'd his way,
Self-mettle tires him. Not a man in England
Can advise me like you: be to yourself
As you would to your friend.


14

I,1,206

Duke of Buckingham. I'll to the king;
And from a mouth of honour quite cry down
This Ipswich fellow's insolence; or proclaim
There's difference in no persons.

Duke of Norfolk. Be advised;
Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot
That it do singe yourself: we may outrun,
By violent swiftness, that which we run at,
And lose by over-running. Know you not,
The fire that mounts the liquor til run o'er,
In seeming to augment it wastes it? Be advised:
I say again, there is no English soul
More stronger to direct you than yourself,
If with the sap of reason you would quench,
Or but allay, the fire of passion.


15

I,1,225

Duke of Buckingham. Sir,
I am thankful to you; and I'll go along
By your prescription: but this top-proud fellow,
Whom from the flow of gall I name not but
From sincere motions, by intelligence,
And proofs as clear as founts in July when
We see each grain of gravel, I do know
To be corrupt and treasonous.

Duke of Norfolk. Say not 'treasonous.'


16

I,1,237

Duke of Buckingham. To the king I'll say't; and make my vouch as strong
As shore of rock. Attend. This holy fox,
Or wolf, or both,—for he is equal ravenous
As he is subtle, and as prone to mischief
As able to perform't; his mind and place
Infecting one another, yea, reciprocally—
Only to show his pomp as well in France
As here at home, suggests the king our master
To this last costly treaty, the interview,
That swallow'd so much treasure, and like a glass
Did break i' the rinsing.

Duke of Norfolk. Faith, and so it did.


17

I,1,264

Duke of Buckingham. Pray, give me favour, sir. This cunning cardinal
The articles o' the combination drew
As himself pleased; and they were ratified
As he cried 'Thus let be': to as much end
As give a crutch to the dead: but our count-cardinal
Has done this, and 'tis well; for worthy Wolsey,
Who cannot err, he did it. Now this follows,—
Which, as I take it, is a kind of puppy
To the old dam, treason,—Charles the emperor,
Under pretence to see the queen his aunt—
For 'twas indeed his colour, but he came
To whisper Wolsey,—here makes visitation:
His fears were, that the interview betwixt
England and France might, through their amity,
Breed him some prejudice; for from this league
Peep'd harms that menaced him: he privily
Deals with our cardinal; and, as I trow,—
Which I do well; for I am sure the emperor
Paid ere he promised; whereby his suit was granted
Ere it was ask'd; but when the way was made,
And paved with gold, the emperor thus desired,
That he would please to alter the king's course,
And break the foresaid peace. Let the king know,
As soon he shall by me, that thus the cardinal
Does buy and sell his honour as he pleases,
And for his own advantage.

Duke of Norfolk. I am sorry
To hear this of him; and could wish he were
Something mistaken in't.


18

I,2,352

Queen Katharine. I am solicited, not by a few,
And those of true condition, that your subjects
Are in great grievance: there have been commissions
Sent down among 'em, which hath flaw'd the heart
Of all their loyalties: wherein, although,
My good lord cardinal, they vent reproaches
Most bitterly on you, as putter on
Of these exactions, yet the king our master—
Whose honour heaven shield from soil!—even he
escapes not
Language unmannerly, yea, such which breaks
The sides of loyalty, and almost appears
In loud rebellion.

Duke of Norfolk. Not almost appears,
It doth appear; for, upon these taxations,
The clothiers all, not able to maintain
The many to them longing, have put off
The spinsters, carders, fullers, weavers, who,
Unfit for other life, compell'd by hunger
And lack of other means, in desperate manner
Daring the event to the teeth, are all in uproar,
And danger serves among then!


19

II,2,1029

(stage directions). [Enter, to Chamberlain, NORFOLK and SUFFOLK]

Duke of Norfolk. Well met, my lord chamberlain.


20

II,2,1034

Lord Chamberlain. I left him private,
Full of sad thoughts and troubles.

Duke of Norfolk. What's the cause?


21

II,2,1039

Duke of Suffolk. No, his conscience
Has crept too near another lady.

Duke of Norfolk. 'Tis so:
This is the cardinal's doing, the king-cardinal:
That blind priest, like the eldest son of fortune,
Turns what he list. The king will know him one day.


22

II,2,1044

Duke of Suffolk. Pray God he do! he'll never know himself else.

Duke of Norfolk. How holily he works in all his business!
And with what zeal! for, now he has crack'd the league
Between us and the emperor, the queen's great nephew,
He dives into the king's soul, and there scatters
Dangers, doubts, wringing of the conscience,
Fears, and despairs; and all these for his marriage:
And out of all these to restore the king,
He counsels a divorce; a loss of her
That, like a jewel, has hung twenty years
About his neck, yet never lost her lustre;
Of her that loves him with that excellence
That angels love good men with; even of her
That, when the greatest stroke of fortune falls,
Will bless the king: and is not this course pious?


23

II,2,1066

Duke of Suffolk. And free us from his slavery.

Duke of Norfolk. We had need pray,
And heartily, for our deliverance;
Or this imperious man will work us all
From princes into pages: all men's honours
Lie like one lump before him, to be fashion'd
Into what pitch he please.


24

II,2,1079

Duke of Suffolk. For me, my lords,
I love him not, nor fear him; there's my creed:
As I am made without him, so I'll stand,
If the king please; his curses and his blessings
Touch me alike, they're breath I not believe in.
I knew him, and I know him; so I leave him
To him that made him proud, the pope.

Duke of Norfolk. Let's in;
And with some other business put the king
From these sad thoughts, that work too much upon him:
My lord, you'll bear us company?


25

II,2,1087

Lord Chamberlain. Excuse me;
The king has sent me otherwhere: besides,
You'll find a most unfit time to disturb him:
Health to your lordships.

Duke of Norfolk. Thanks, my good lord chamberlain.
[Exit Chamberlain; and KING HENRY VIII draws the]
curtain, and sits reading pensively]


26

II,2,1092

Henry VIII. Who's there, ha?

Duke of Norfolk. Pray God he be not angry.


27

II,2,1096

Henry VIII. Who's there, I say? How dare you thrust yourselves
Into my private meditations?
Who am I? ha?

Duke of Norfolk. A gracious king that pardons all offences
Malice ne'er meant: our breach of duty this way
Is business of estate; in which we come
To know your royal pleasure.


28

II,2,1120

Henry VIII. [To NORFOLK and SUFFOLK]
We are busy; go.

Duke of Norfolk. [Aside to SUFFOLK]
This priest has no pride in him?


29

II,2,1125

Duke of Suffolk. [Aside to NORFOLK] Not to speak of:
I would not be so sick though for his place:
But this cannot continue.

Duke of Norfolk. [Aside to SUFFOLK] If it do,
I'll venture one have-at-him.


30

III,2,1828

(stage directions). [Enter NORFOLK, SUFFOLK, SURREY, and Chamberlain]

Duke of Norfolk. If you will now unite in your complaints,
And force them with a constancy, the cardinal
Cannot stand under them: if you omit
The offer of this time, I cannot promise
But that you shall sustain moe new disgraces,
With these you bear already.


31

III,2,1850

Lord Chamberlain. My lords, you speak your pleasures:
What he deserves of you and me I know;
What we can do to him, though now the time
Gives way to us, I much fear. If you cannot
Bar his access to the king, never attempt
Any thing on him; for he hath a witchcraft
Over the king in's tongue.

Duke of Norfolk. O, fear him not;
His spell in that is out: the king hath found
Matter against him that for ever mars
The honey of his language. No, he's settled,
Not to come off, in his displeasure.


32

III,2,1858

Earl of Surrey. Sir,
I should be glad to hear such news as this
Once every hour.

Duke of Norfolk. Believe it, this is true:
In the divorce his contrary proceedings
Are all unfolded wherein he appears
As I would wish mine enemy.


33

III,2,1887

Duke of Suffolk. My amen to't!

Duke of Norfolk. All men's!


34

III,2,1898

Earl of Surrey. But, will the king
Digest this letter of the cardinal's?
The Lord forbid!

Duke of Norfolk. Marry, amen!


35

III,2,1909

Lord Chamberlain. Now, God incense him,
And let him cry Ha! louder!

Duke of Norfolk. But, my lord,
When returns Cranmer?


36

III,2,1919

Duke of Suffolk. He is return'd in his opinions; which
Have satisfied the king for his divorce,
Together with all famous colleges
Almost in Christendom: shortly, I believe,
His second marriage shall be publish'd, and
Her coronation. Katharine no more
Shall be call'd queen, but princess dowager
And widow to Prince Arthur.

Duke of Norfolk. This same Cranmer's
A worthy fellow, and hath ta'en much pain
In the king's business.


37

III,2,1924

Duke of Suffolk. He has; and we shall see him
For it an archbishop.

Duke of Norfolk. So I hear.


38

III,2,1928

(stage directions). [Enter CARDINAL WOLSEY and CROMWELL]

Duke of Norfolk. Observe, observe, he's moody.


39

III,2,1950

Cardinal Wolsey. Leave me awhile.
[Exit CROMWELL]
[Aside]
It shall be to the Duchess of Alencon,
The French king's sister: he shall marry her.
Anne Bullen! No; I'll no Anne Bullens for him:
There's more in't than fair visage. Bullen!
No, we'll no Bullens. Speedily I wish
To hear from Rome. The Marchioness of Pembroke!

Duke of Norfolk. He's discontented.


40

III,2,1967

Cardinal Wolsey. [Aside] The late queen's gentlewoman,
a knight's daughter,
To be her mistress' mistress! the queen's queen!
This candle burns not clear: 'tis I must snuff it;
Then out it goes. What though I know her virtuous
And well deserving? yet I know her for
A spleeny Lutheran; and not wholesome to
Our cause, that she should lie i' the bosom of
Our hard-ruled king. Again, there is sprung up
An heretic, an arch one, Cranmer; one
Hath crawl'd into the favour of the king,
And is his oracle.

Duke of Norfolk. He is vex'd at something.


41

III,2,1977

Henry VIII. What piles of wealth hath he accumulated
To his own portion! and what expense by the hour
Seems to flow from him! How, i' the name of thrift,
Does he rake this together! Now, my lords,
Saw you the cardinal?

Duke of Norfolk. My lord, we have
Stood here observing him: some strange commotion
Is in his brain: he bites his lip, and starts;
Stops on a sudden, looks upon the ground,
Then lays his finger on his temple, straight
Springs out into fast gait; then stops again,
Strikes his breast hard, and anon he casts
His eye against the moon: in most strange postures
We have seen him set himself.


42

III,2,1996

Henry VIII. It may well be;
There is a mutiny in's mind. This morning
Papers of state he sent me to peruse,
As I required: and wot you what I found
There,—on my conscience, put unwittingly?
Forsooth, an inventory, thus importing;
The several parcels of his plate, his treasure,
Rich stuffs, and ornaments of household; which
I find at such proud rate, that it out-speaks
Possession of a subject.

Duke of Norfolk. It's heaven's will:
Some spirit put this paper in the packet,
To bless your eye withal.


43

III,2,2115

Cardinal Wolsey. What should this mean?
What sudden anger's this? how have I reap'd it?
He parted frowning from me, as if ruin
Leap'd from his eyes: so looks the chafed lion
Upon the daring huntsman that has gall'd him;
Then makes him nothing. I must read this paper;
I fear, the story of his anger. 'Tis so;
This paper has undone me: 'tis the account
Of all that world of wealth I have drawn together
For mine own ends; indeed, to gain the popedom,
And fee my friends in Rome. O negligence!
Fit for a fool to fall by: what cross devil
Made me put this main secret in the packet
I sent the king? Is there no way to cure this?
No new device to beat this from his brains?
I know 'twill stir him strongly; yet I know
A way, if it take right, in spite of fortune
Will bring me off again. What's this? 'To the Pope!'
The letter, as I live, with all the business
I writ to's holiness. Nay then, farewell!
I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness;
And, from that full meridian of my glory,
I haste now to my setting: I shall fall
Like a bright exhalation m the evening,
And no man see me more.
[Re-enter to CARDINAL WOLSEY, NORFOLK and SUFFOLK, SURREY,]
and the Chamberlain]

Duke of Norfolk. Hear the king's pleasure, cardinal: who commands you
To render up the great seal presently
Into our hands; and to confine yourself
To Asher House, my Lord of Winchester's,
Till you hear further from his highness.


44

III,2,2196

Cardinal Wolsey. How much, methinks, I could despise this man,
But that I am bound in charity against it!

Duke of Norfolk. Those articles, my lord, are in the king's hand:
But, thus much, they are foul ones.


45

III,2,2213

Earl of Surrey. I had rather want those than my head. Have at you!
First, that, without the king's assent or knowledge,
You wrought to be a legate; by which power
You maim'd the jurisdiction of all bishops.

Duke of Norfolk. Then, that in all you writ to Rome, or else
To foreign princes, 'Ego et Rex meus'
Was still inscribed; in which you brought the king
To be your servant.


46

III,2,2248

Duke of Suffolk. Lord cardinal, the king's further pleasure is,
Because all those things you have done of late,
By your power legatine, within this kingdom,
Fall into the compass of a praemunire,
That therefore such a writ be sued against you;
To forfeit all your goods, lands, tenements,
Chattels, and whatsoever, and to be
Out of the king's protection. This is my charge.

Duke of Norfolk. And so we'll leave you to your meditations
How to live better. For your stubborn answer
About the giving back the great seal to us,
The king shall know it, and, no doubt, shall thank you.
So fare you well, my little good lord cardinal.


47

V,3,3058

Cromwell. Yes.

Duke of Norfolk. Who waits there?


48

V,3,3180

Duke of Suffolk. 'Tis the right ring, by heaven: I told ye all,
When ye first put this dangerous stone a-rolling,
'Twould fall upon ourselves.

Duke of Norfolk. Do you think, my lords,
The king will suffer but the little finger
Of this man to be vex'd?


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