Speeches (Lines) for Duke
in "Merchant of Venice"

Total: 18

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

IV,1,1931

What, is Antonio here?

2

IV,1,1933

I am sorry for thee: thou art come to answer
A stony adversary, an inhuman wretch
uncapable of pity, void and empty
From any dram of mercy.

3

IV,1,1945

Go one, and call the Jew into the court.

4

IV,1,1948

Make room, and let him stand before our face.
Shylock, the world thinks, and I think so too,
That thou but lead'st this fashion of thy malice
To the last hour of act; and then 'tis thought
Thou'lt show thy mercy and remorse more strange
Than is thy strange apparent cruelty;
And where thou now exact'st the penalty,
Which is a pound of this poor merchant's flesh,
Thou wilt not only loose the forfeiture,
But, touch'd with human gentleness and love,
Forgive a moiety of the principal;
Glancing an eye of pity on his losses,
That have of late so huddled on his back,
Enow to press a royal merchant down
And pluck commiseration of his state
From brassy bosoms and rough hearts of flint,
From stubborn Turks and Tartars, never train'd
To offices of tender courtesy.
We all expect a gentle answer, Jew.

5

IV,1,2020

How shalt thou hope for mercy, rendering none?

6

IV,1,2036

Upon my power I may dismiss this court,
Unless Bellario, a learned doctor,
Whom I have sent for to determine this,
Come here to-day.

7

IV,1,2043

Bring us the letter; call the messenger.

8

IV,1,2053

Came you from Padua, from Bellario?

9

IV,1,2078

This letter from Bellario doth commend
A young and learned doctor to our court.
Where is he?

10

IV,1,2083

With all my heart. Some three or four of you
Go give him courteous conduct to this place.
Meantime the court shall hear Bellario's letter.

11

IV,1,2103

You hear the learn'd Bellario, what he writes:
And here, I take it, is the doctor come.
[Enter PORTIA, dressed like a doctor of laws]
Give me your hand. Come you from old Bellario?

12

IV,1,2108

You are welcome: take your place.
Are you acquainted with the difference
That holds this present question in the court?

13

IV,1,2113

Antonio and old Shylock, both stand forth.

14

IV,1,2317

That thou shalt see the difference of our spirits,
I pardon thee thy life before thou ask it:
For half thy wealth, it is Antonio's;
The other half comes to the general state,
Which humbleness may drive unto a fine.

15

IV,1,2340

He shall do this, or else I do recant
The pardon that I late pronounced here.

16

IV,1,2348

Get thee gone, but do it.

17

IV,1,2353

Sir, I entreat you home with me to dinner.

18

IV,1,2357

I am sorry that your leisure serves you not.
Antonio, gratify this gentleman,
For, in my mind, you are much bound to him.

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