Speeches (Lines) for Domitius Enobarus
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 113

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,91

Bring in the banquet quickly; wine enough
Cleopatra's health to drink.

2

I,2,122

Mine, and most of our fortunes, to-night, shall
be—drunk to bed.

3

I,2,154

Hush! here comes Antony.

4

I,2,158

No, lady.

5

I,2,163

Madam?

6

I,2,225

What's your pleasure, sir?

7

I,2,227

Why, then, we kill all our women:
we see how mortal an unkindness is to them;...

8

I,2,231

Under a compelling occasion, let women die; it were
pity to cast them away for nothing; though, between...

9

I,2,241

Alack, sir, no; her passions are made of nothing but
the finest part of pure love: we cannot call her...

10

I,2,248

O, sir, you had then left unseen a wonderful piece
of work; which not to have been blest withal would...

11

I,2,252

Sir?

12

I,2,254

Fulvia!

13

I,2,256

Why, sir, give the gods a thankful sacrifice. When
it pleaseth their deities to take the wife of a man...

14

I,2,268

And the business you have broached here cannot be
without you; especially that of Cleopatra's, which...

15

I,2,292

I shall do't.

16

II,2,684

I shall entreat him
To answer like himself: if Caesar move him,...

17

II,2,692

Every time
Serves for the matter that is then born in't.

18

II,2,695

Not if the small come first.

19

II,2,700

And yonder, Caesar.

20

II,2,765

Would we had all such wives, that the men might go
to wars with the women!

21

II,2,811

Or, if you borrow one another's love for the
instant, you may, when you hear no more words of...

22

II,2,816

That truth should be silent I had almost forgot.

23

II,2,818

Go to, then; your considerate stone.

24

II,2,897

Half the heart of Caesar, worthy Mecaenas! My
honourable friend, Agrippa!

25

II,2,902

Ay, sir; we did sleep day out of countenance, and
made the night light with drinking.

26

II,2,906

This was but as a fly by an eagle: we had much more
monstrous matter of feast, which worthily deserved noting.

27

II,2,910

When she first met Mark Antony, she pursed up
his heart, upon the river of Cydnus.

28

II,2,914

I will tell you.
The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne,...

29

II,2,931

Her gentlewomen, like the Nereides,
So many mermaids, tended her i' the eyes,...

30

II,2,945

Upon her landing, Antony sent to her,
Invited her to supper: she replied,...

31

II,2,956

I saw her once
Hop forty paces through the public street;...

32

II,2,962

Never; he will not:
Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale...

33

II,2,975

Humbly, sir, I thank you.

34

II,6,1299

No more of that: he did so.

35

II,6,1301

A certain queen to Caesar in a mattress.

36

II,6,1303

Well;
And well am like to do; for, I perceive,...

37

II,6,1309

Sir,
I never loved you much; but I ha' praised ye,...

38

II,6,1322

At sea, I think.

39

II,6,1324

You have done well by water.

40

II,6,1326

I will praise any man that will praise me; though it
cannot be denied what I have done by land.

41

II,6,1329

Yes, something you can deny for your own
safety: you have been a great thief by sea.

42

II,6,1332

There I deny my land service. But give me your
hand, Menas: if our eyes had authority, here they...

43

II,6,1336

But there is never a fair woman has a true face.

44

II,6,1338

We came hither to fight with you.

45

II,6,1341

If he do, sure, he cannot weep't back again.

46

II,6,1344

Caesar's sister is called Octavia.

47

II,6,1346

But she is now the wife of Marcus Antonius.

48

II,6,1348

'Tis true.

49

II,6,1350

If I were bound to divine of this unity, I would
not prophesy so.

50

II,6,1354

I think so too. But you shall find, the band that
seems to tie their friendship together will be the...

51

II,6,1359

Not he that himself is not so; which is Mark Antony.
He will to his Egyptian dish again: then shall the...

52

II,6,1368

I shall take it, sir: we have used our throats in Egypt.

53

II,7,1407

Not till you have slept; I fear me you'll be in till then.

54

II,7,1477

Here's to thee, Menas!

55

II,7,1480

There's a strong fellow, Menas.

56

II,7,1483

A' bears the third part of the world, man; see'st
not?

57

II,7,1487

Drink thou; increase the reels.

58

II,7,1499

Ha, my brave emperor!
[To MARK ANTONY]...

59

II,7,1507

All take hands.
Make battery to our ears with the loud music:...

60

II,7,1534

Take heed you fall not.
[Exeunt all but DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS and MENAS]...

61

II,7,1542

Ho! says a' There's my cap.

62

III,2,1594

They have dispatch'd with Pompey, he is gone;
The other three are sealing. Octavia weeps...

63

III,2,1600

A very fine one: O, how he loves Caesar!

64

III,2,1602

Caesar? Why, he's the Jupiter of men.

65

III,2,1604

Spake you of Caesar? How! the non-pareil!

66

III,2,1606

Would you praise Caesar, say 'Caesar:' go no further.

67

III,2,1608

But he loves Caesar best; yet he loves Antony:
Ho! hearts, tongues, figures, scribes, bards,...

68

III,2,1615

They are his shards, and he their beetle.
[Trumpets within]...

69

III,2,1654

[Aside to AGRIPPA] Will Caesar weep?

70

III,2,1656

[Aside to AGRIPPA] He were the worse for that,
were he a horse;...

71

III,2,1663

[Aside to AGRIPPA] That year, indeed, he was
troubled with a rheum;...

72

III,5,1795

How now, friend Eros!

73

III,5,1797

What, man?

74

III,5,1799

This is old: what is the success?

75

III,5,1806

Then, world, thou hast a pair of chaps, no more;
And throw between them all the food thou hast,...

76

III,5,1813

Our great navy's rigg'd.

77

III,5,1817

'Twill be naught:
But let it be. Bring me to Antony.

78

III,7,1937

But why, why, why?

79

III,7,1940

Well, is it, is it?

80

III,7,1943

[Aside] Well, I could reply:
If we should serve with horse and mares together,...

81

III,7,1948

Your presence needs must puzzle Antony;
Take from his heart, take from his brain,...

82

III,7,1960

Nay, I have done.
Here comes the emperor.

83

III,7,1976

So hath my lord dared him to single fight.

84

III,7,1981

Your ships are not well mann'd;
Your mariners are muleters, reapers, people...

85

III,7,1989

Most worthy sir, you therein throw away
The absolute soldiership you have by land;...

86

III,10,2062

Naught, naught all, naught! I can behold no longer:
The Antoniad, the Egyptian admiral,...

87

III,10,2069

What's thy passion!

88

III,10,2073

How appears the fight?

89

III,10,2081

That I beheld:
Mine eyes did sicken at the sight, and could not...

90

III,10,2091

Alack, alack!

91

III,10,2098

Ay, are you thereabouts?
Why, then, good night indeed.

92

III,10,2106

I'll yet follow
The wounded chance of Antony, though my reason...

93

III,13,2245

Think, and die.

94

III,13,2247

Antony only, that would make his will
Lord of his reason. What though you fled...

95

III,13,2279

[Aside] Yes, like enough, high-battled Caesar will
Unstate his happiness, and be staged to the show,...

96

III,13,2294

[Aside] Mine honesty and I begin to square.
The loyalty well held to fools does make...

97

III,13,2305

He needs as many, sir, as Caesar has;
Or needs not us. If Caesar please, our master...

98

III,13,2323

[Aside] To be sure of that,
I will ask Antony. Sir, sir, thou art so leaky,...

99

III,13,2359

[Aside] You will be whipp'd.

100

III,13,2368

[Aside] 'Tis better playing with a lion's whelp
Than with an old one dying.

101

III,13,2486

Now he'll outstare the lightning. To be furious,
Is to be frighted out of fear; and in that mood...

102

IV,2,2518

No.

103

IV,2,2520

He thinks, being twenty times of better fortune,
He is twenty men to one.

104

IV,2,2526

I'll strike, and cry 'Take all.'

105

IV,2,2536

[Aside to CLEOPATRA] 'Tis one of those odd
tricks which sorrow shoots...

106

IV,2,2550

[Aside to CLEOPATRA] To make his followers weep.

107

IV,2,2561

What mean you, sir,
To give them this discomfort? Look, they weep;...

108

IV,6,2720

Alexas did revolt; and went to Jewry on
Affairs of Antony; there did persuade...

109

IV,6,2735

I give it you.

110

IV,6,2742

I am alone the villain of the earth,
And feel I am so most. O Antony,...

111

IV,9,2839

O, bear me witness, night,—

112

IV,9,2842

Be witness to me, O thou blessed moon,
When men revolted shall upon record...

113

IV,9,2849

O sovereign mistress of true melancholy,
The poisonous damp of night disponge upon me,...

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