Speeches (Lines) for Diomedes
in "Troilus and Cressida"

Total: 54

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,3,1424

[Aside to NESTOR] And how his silence drinks up
this applause!

2

II,3,1448

You must prepare to fight without Achilles.

3

II,3,1459

Or covetous of praise,—

4

II,3,1461

Or strange, or self-affected!

5

II,3,1481

Be ruled by him, Lord Ajax.

6

III,3,1902

This shall I undertake; and 'tis a burden
Which I am proud to bear.

7

IV,1,2205

That's my mind too. Good morrow, Lord AEneas.

8

IV,1,2214

The one and other Diomed embraces.
Our bloods are now in calm; and, so long, health!
But when contention and occasion meet,
By Jove, I'll play the hunter for thy life
With all my force, pursuit and policy.

9

IV,1,2225

We sympathize: Jove, let AEneas live,
If to my sword his fate be not the glory,
A thousand complete courses of the sun!
But, in mine emulous honour, let him die,
With every joint a wound, and that to-morrow!

10

IV,1,2231

We do; and long to know each other worse.

11

IV,1,2258

Both alike:
He merits well to have her, that doth seek her,
Not making any scruple of her soilure,
With such a hell of pain and world of charge,
And you as well to keep her, that defend her,
Not palating the taste of her dishonour,
With such a costly loss of wealth and friends:
He, like a puling cuckold, would drink up
The lees and dregs of a flat tamed piece;
You, like a lecher, out of whorish loins
Are pleased to breed out your inheritors:
Both merits poised, each weighs nor less nor more;
But he as he, the heavier for a whore.

12

IV,1,2272

She's bitter to her country: hear me, Paris:
For every false drop in her bawdy veins
A Grecian's life hath sunk; for every scruple
Of her contaminated carrion weight,
A Trojan hath been slain: since she could speak,
She hath not given so many good words breath
As for her Greeks and Trojans suffer'd death.

13

IV,4,2555

Fair Lady Cressid,
So please you, save the thanks this prince expects:
The lustre in your eye, heaven in your cheek,
Pleads your fair usage; and to Diomed
You shall be mistress, and command him wholly.

14

IV,4,2569

O, be not moved, Prince Troilus:
Let me be privileged by my place and message,
To be a speaker free; when I am hence
I'll answer to my lust: and know you, lord,
I'll nothing do on charge: to her own worth
She shall be prized; but that you say 'be't so,'
I'll speak it in my spirit and honour, 'no.'

15

IV,5,2616

Even she.

16

IV,5,2657

Lady, a word: I'll bring you to your father.

17

IV,5,2734

You must no more.

18

IV,5,2738

As Hector pleases.

19

IV,5,2774

'Tis Agamemnon's wish, and great Achilles
Doth long to see unarm'd the valiant Hector.

20

V,1,3022

I cannot, lord; I have important business,
The tide whereof is now. Good night, great Hector.

21

V,2,3046

What, are you up here, ho? speak.

22

V,2,3048

Calchas, I think. Where's your daughter?

23

V,2,3055

How now, my charge!

24

V,2,3062

Will you remember?

25

V,2,3064

Nay, but do, then;
And let your mind be coupled with your words.

26

V,2,3070

Nay, then,—

27

V,2,3072

Foh, foh! come, tell a pin: you are forsworn.

28

V,2,3075

What did you swear you would bestow on me?

29

V,2,3078

Good night.

30

V,2,3082

No, no, good night: I'll be your fool no more.

31

V,2,3097

And so, good night.

32

V,2,3105

Foh, foh! adieu; you palter.

33

V,2,3116

But will you, then?

34

V,2,3118

Give me some token for the surety of it.

35

V,2,3133

Whose was't?

36

V,2,3138

I shall have it.

37

V,2,3140

Ay, that.

38

V,2,3147

I had your heart before, this follows it.

39

V,2,3151

I will have this: whose was it?

40

V,2,3153

Come, tell me whose it was.

41

V,2,3156

Whose was it?

42

V,2,3159

To-morrow will I wear it on my helm,
And grieve his spirit that dares not challenge it.

43

V,2,3165

Why, then, farewell;
Thou never shalt mock Diomed again.

44

V,2,3169

I do not like this fooling.

45

V,2,3171

What, shall I come? the hour?

46

V,2,3173

Farewell till then.

47

V,4,3431

Thou dost miscall retire:
I do not fly, but advantageous care
Withdrew me from the odds of multitude:
Have at thee!

48

V,5,3453

Go, go, my servant, take thou Troilus' horse;
Present the fair steed to my lady Cressid:
Fellow, commend my service to her beauty;
Tell her I have chastised the amorous Trojan,
And am her knight by proof.

49

V,5,3503

Ay, there, there.

50

V,6,3514

Troilus, I say! where's Troilus?

51

V,6,3516

I would correct him.

52

V,6,3522

Ha, art thou there?

53

V,6,3524

He is my prize; I will not look upon.

54

V,9,3623

The bruit is, Hector's slain, and by Achilles.

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