Speeches (Lines) for Dick the Butcher
in "Henry VI, Part II"

Total: 24

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

IV,2,2339

Jack Cade. We John Cade, so termed of our supposed father,—

Dick the Butcher. [Aside] Or rather, of stealing a cade of herrings.


2

IV,2,2343

Jack Cade. For our enemies shall fall before us, inspired with
the spirit of putting down kings and princes,
—Command silence.

Dick the Butcher. Silence!


3

IV,2,2345

Jack Cade. My father was a Mortimer,—

Dick the Butcher. [Aside] He was an honest man, and a good
bricklayer.


4

IV,2,2348

Jack Cade. My mother a Plantagenet,—

Dick the Butcher. [Aside] I knew her well; she was a midwife.


5

IV,2,2350

Jack Cade. My wife descended of the Lacies,—

Dick the Butcher. [Aside] She was, indeed, a pedler's daughter, and
sold many laces.


6

IV,2,2355

Jack Cade. Therefore am I of an honourable house.

Dick the Butcher. [Aside] Ay, by my faith, the field is honourable;
and there was he borne, under a hedge, for his
father had never a house but the cage.


7

IV,2,2361

Jack Cade. I am able to endure much.

Dick the Butcher. [Aside] No question of that; for I have seen him
whipped three market-days together.


8

IV,2,2365

Smith the Weaver. [Aside] He need not fear the sword; for his coat is of proof.

Dick the Butcher. [Aside] But methinks he should stand in fear of
fire, being burnt i' the hand for stealing of sheep.


9

IV,2,2379

Jack Cade. I thank you, good people: there shall be no money;
all shall eat and drink on my score; and I will
apparel them all in one livery, that they may agree
like brothers and worship me their lord.

Dick the Butcher. The first thing we do, let's kill all the lawyers.


10

IV,2,2395

Jack Cade. Nay, then, he is a conjurer.

Dick the Butcher. Nay, he can make obligations, and write court-hand.


11

IV,2,2400

Clerk of Chatham. Emmanuel.

Dick the Butcher. They use to write it on the top of letters: 'twill
go hard with you.


12

IV,2,2453

Jack Cade. Ay, there's the question; but I say, 'tis true:
The elder of them, being put to nurse,
Was by a beggar-woman stolen away;
And, ignorant of his birth and parentage,
Became a bricklayer when he came to age:
His son am I; deny it, if you can.

Dick the Butcher. Nay, 'tis too true; therefore he shall be king.


13

IV,2,2466

Jack Cade. [Aside] He lies, for I invented it myself.
Go to, sirrah, tell the king from me, that, for his
father's sake, Henry the Fifth, in whose time boys
went to span-counter for French crowns, I am content
he shall reign; but I'll be protector over him.

Dick the Butcher. And furthermore, well have the Lord Say's head for
selling the dukedom of Maine.


14

IV,2,2495

Jack Cade. And you that love the commons, follow me.
Now show yourselves men; 'tis for liberty.
We will not leave one lord, one gentleman:
Spare none but such as go in clouted shoon;
For they are thrifty honest men, and such
As would, but that they dare not, take our parts.

Dick the Butcher. They are all in order and march toward us.


15

IV,3,2502

Jack Cade. Where's Dick, the butcher of Ashford?

Dick the Butcher. Here, sir.


16

IV,3,2509

Jack Cade. They fell before thee like sheep and oxen, and thou
behavedst thyself as if thou hadst been in thine own
slaughter-house: therefore thus will I reward thee,
the Lent shall be as long again as it is; and thou
shalt have a licence to kill for a hundred lacking
one.

Dick the Butcher. I desire no more.


17

IV,3,2516

Jack Cade. And, to speak truth, thou deservest no less. This
monument of the victory will I bear;
[Putting on SIR HUMPHREY'S brigandine]
and the bodies shall be dragged at my horse' heels
till I do come to London, where we will have the
mayor's sword borne before us.

Dick the Butcher. If we mean to thrive and do good, break open the
gaols and let out the prisoners.


18

IV,6,2615

Smith the Weaver. If this fellow be wise, he'll never call ye Jack
Cade more: I think he hath a very fair warning.

Dick the Butcher. My lord, there's an army gathered together in
Smithfield.


19

IV,7,2625

Jack Cade. So, sirs: now go some and pull down the Savoy;
others to the inns of court; down with them all.

Dick the Butcher. I have a suit unto your lordship.


20

IV,7,2627

Jack Cade. Be it a lordship, thou shalt have it for that word.

Dick the Butcher. Only that the laws of England may come out of your mouth.


21

IV,7,2673

Jack Cade. Marry, thou oughtest not to let thy horse wear a
cloak, when honester men than thou go in their hose
and doublets.

Dick the Butcher. And work in their shirt too; as myself, for example,
that am a butcher.


22

IV,7,2676

Lord Say. You men of Kent,—

Dick the Butcher. What say you of Kent?


23

IV,7,2708

Jack Cade. Ye shall have a hempen caudle, then, and the help of hatchet.

Dick the Butcher. Why dost thou quiver, man?


24

IV,7,2742

Jack Cade. Away with him! and do as I command ye.
[Exeunt some with Lord SAY]
The proudest peer in the realm shall not wear a head
on his shoulders, unless he pay me tribute; there
shall not a maid be married, but she shall pay to me
her maidenhead ere they have it: men shall hold of
me in capite; and we charge and command that their
wives be as free as heart can wish or tongue can tell.

Dick the Butcher. My lord, when shall we go to Cheapside and take up
commodities upon our bills?


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