Speeches (Lines) for Dromio of Syracuse
in "Comedy of Errors"

Total: 99

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,179

Many a man would take you at your word,
And go indeed, having so good a mean.

2

II,2,406

What answer, sir? when spake I such a word?

3

II,2,408

I did not see you since you sent me hence,
Home to the Centaur, with the gold you gave me.

4

II,2,413

I am glad to see you in this merry vein:
What means this jest? I pray you, master, tell me.

5

II,2,418

Hold, sir, for God's sake! now your jest is earnest:
Upon what bargain do you give it me?

6

II,2,429

Sconce call you it? so you would leave battering, I
had rather have it a head: an you use these blows...

7

II,2,435

Nothing, sir, but that I am beaten.

8

II,2,437

Ay, sir, and wherefore; for they say every why hath
a wherefore.

9

II,2,441

Was there ever any man thus beaten out of season,
When in the why and the wherefore is neither rhyme...

10

II,2,446

Marry, sir, for this something that you gave me for nothing.

11

II,2,449

No, sir; I think the meat wants that I have.

12

II,2,451

Basting.

13

II,2,453

If it be, sir, I pray you, eat none of it.

14

II,2,455

Lest it make you choleric and purchase me another
dry basting.

15

II,2,459

I durst have denied that, before you were so choleric.

16

II,2,461

Marry, sir, by a rule as plain as the plain bald
pate of father Time himself.

17

II,2,464

There's no time for a man to recover his hair that
grows bald by nature.

18

II,2,467

Yes, to pay a fine for a periwig and recover the
lost hair of another man.

19

II,2,471

Because it is a blessing that he bestows on beasts;
and what he hath scanted men in hair he hath given them in wit.

20

II,2,474

Not a man of those but he hath the wit to lose his hair.

21

II,2,476

The plainer dealer, the sooner lost: yet he loseth
it in a kind of jollity.

22

II,2,479

For two; and sound ones too.

23

II,2,481

Sure ones, then.

24

II,2,483

Certain ones then.

25

II,2,485

The one, to save the money that he spends in
trimming; the other, that at dinner they should not...

26

II,2,490

Marry, and did, sir; namely, no time to recover hair
lost by nature.

27

II,2,494

Thus I mend it: Time himself is bald and therefore
to the world's end will have bald followers.

28

II,2,545

By me?

29

II,2,551

I, sir? I never saw her till this time.

30

II,2,554

I never spake with her in all my life.

31

II,2,577

O, for my beads! I cross me for a sinner.
This is the fairy land: O spite of spites!...

32

II,2,584

I am transformed, master, am I not?

33

II,2,586

Nay, master, both in mind and in my shape.

34

II,2,588

No, I am an ape.

35

II,2,590

'Tis true; she rides me and I long for grass.
'Tis so, I am an ass; else it could never be...

36

II,2,607

Master, shall I be porter at the gate?

37

III,1,645

[Within] Mome, malt-horse, capon, coxcomb,
idiot, patch!...

38

III,1,653

[Within] Let him walk from whence he came, lest he
catch cold on's feet.

39

III,1,656

[Within] Right, sir; I'll tell you when, an you tell
me wherefore.

40

III,1,659

[Within] Nor to-day here you must not; come again
when you may.

41

III,1,662

[Within] The porter for this time, sir, and my name
is Dromio.

42

III,1,678

[Within] If thy name be call'd Luce—Luce, thou hast
answered him well.

43

III,1,682

[Within] And you said no.

44

III,1,692

[Within] By my troth, your town is troubled with
unruly boys.

45

III,1,706

[Within] Break any breaking here, and I'll break your
knave's pate.

46

III,1,710

[Within] It seems thou want'st breaking: out upon
thee, hind!

47

III,1,714

[Within] Ay, when fowls have no feathers and fish have no fin.

48

III,2,839

Do you know me, sir? am I Dromio? am I your man?
am I myself?

49

III,2,842

I am an ass, I am a woman's man and besides myself.

50

III,2,844

Marry, sir, besides myself, I am due to a woman; one
that claims me, one that haunts me, one that will have me.

51

III,2,847

Marry sir, such claim as you would lay to your
horse; and she would have me as a beast: not that, I...

52

III,2,852

A very reverent body; ay, such a one as a man may
not speak of without he say 'Sir-reverence.' I have...

53

III,2,857

Marry, sir, she's the kitchen wench and all grease;
and I know not what use to put her to but to make a...

54

III,2,864

Swart, like my shoe, but her face nothing half so
clean kept: for why, she sweats; a man may go over...

55

III,2,868

No, sir, 'tis in grain; Noah's flood could not do it.

56

III,2,870

Nell, sir; but her name and three quarters, that's
an ell and three quarters, will not measure her from...

57

III,2,874

No longer from head to foot than from hip to hip:
she is spherical, like a globe; I could find out...

58

III,2,878

Marry, in her buttocks: I found it out by the bogs.

59

III,2,880

I found it by the barrenness; hard in the palm of the hand.

60

III,2,882

In her forehead; armed and reverted, making war
against her heir.

61

III,2,885

I looked for the chalky cliffs, but I could find no
whiteness in them; but I guess it stood in her chin,...

62

III,2,889

Faith, I saw it not; but I felt it hot in her breath.

63

III,2,891

Oh, sir, upon her nose all o'er embellished with
rubies, carbuncles, sapphires, declining their rich...

64

III,2,896

Oh, sir, I did not look so low. To conclude, this
drudge, or diviner, laid claim to me, call'd me...

65

III,2,913

As from a bear a man would run for life,
So fly I from her that would be my wife.

66

IV,1,1039

Master, there is a bark of Epidamnum
That stays but till her owner comes aboard,...

67

IV,1,1049

A ship you sent me to, to hire waftage.

68

IV,1,1052

You sent me for a rope's end as soon:
You sent me to the bay, sir, for a bark.

69

IV,1,1065

To Adriana! that is where we dined,
Where Dowsabel did claim me for her husband:...

70

IV,2,1103

Here! go; the desk, the purse! sweet, now, make haste.

71

IV,2,1105

By running fast.

72

IV,2,1107

No, he's in Tartar limbo, worse than hell.
A devil in an everlasting garment hath him;...

73

IV,2,1118

I do not know the matter: he is 'rested on the case.

74

IV,2,1120

I know not at whose suit he is arrested well;
But he's in a suit of buff which 'rested him, that can I tell....

75

IV,2,1128

Not on a band, but on a stronger thing;
A chain, a chain! Do you not hear it ring?

76

IV,2,1131

No, no, the bell: 'tis time that I were gone:
It was two ere I left him, and now the clock...

77

IV,2,1135

O, yes; if any hour meet a sergeant, a' turns back for
very fear.

78

IV,2,1138

Time is a very bankrupt, and owes more than he's
worth, to season....

79

IV,3,1163

Master, here's the gold you sent me for. What, have
you got the picture of old Adam new-apparelled?

80

IV,3,1166

Not that Adam that kept the Paradise but that Adam
that keeps the prison: he that goes in the calf's...

81

IV,3,1172

No? why, 'tis a plain case: he that went, like a
bass-viol, in a case of leather; the man, sir,...

82

IV,3,1180

Ay, sir, the sergeant of the band, he that brings
any man to answer it that breaks his band; one that...

83

IV,3,1185

Why, sir, I brought you word an hour since that the
bark Expedition put forth to-night; and then were...

84

IV,3,1198

Master, is this Mistress Satan?

85

IV,3,1200

Nay, she is worse, she is the devil's dam; and here
she comes in the habit of a light wench: and thereof...

86

IV,3,1209

Master, if you do, expect spoon-meat; or bespeak a
long spoon.

87

IV,3,1212

Marry, he must have a long spoon that must eat with
the devil.

88

IV,3,1220

Some devils ask but the parings of one's nail,
A rush, a hair, a drop of blood, a pin,...

89

IV,3,1229

'Fly pride,' says the peacock: mistress, that you know.

90

IV,4,1411

She that would be your wife now ran from you.

91

IV,4,1414

Faith, stay here this night; they will surely do us
no harm: you saw they speak us fair, give us gold:...

92

V,1,1462

Run, master, run; for God's sake, take a house!
This is some priory. In, or we are spoil'd!...

93

V,1,1777

I, sir, am Dromio; command him away.

94

V,1,1780

O, my old master! who hath bound him here?

95

V,1,1855

Master, shall I fetch your stuff from shipboard?

96

V,1,1857

Your goods that lay at host, sir, in the Centaur.

97

V,1,1862

There is a fat friend at your master's house,
That kitchen'd me for you to-day at dinner:...

98

V,1,1868

Not I, sir; you are my elder.

99

V,1,1870

We'll draw cuts for the senior: till then lead thou first.

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