Speeches (Lines) for Countess
in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 87

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,3

In delivering my son from me, I bury a second husband.

2

I,1,12

What hope is there of his majesty's amendment?

3

I,1,17

This young gentlewoman had a father,—O, that
'had'! how sad a passage 'tis!—whose skill was...

4

I,1,25

He was famous, sir, in his profession, and it was
his great right to be so: Gerard de Narbon.

5

I,1,36

His sole child, my lord, and bequeathed to my
overlooking. I have those hopes of her good that...

6

I,1,45

'Tis the best brine a maiden can season her praise
in. The remembrance of her father never approaches...

7

I,1,54

If the living be enemy to the grief, the excess
makes it soon mortal.

8

I,1,58

Be thou blest, Bertram, and succeed thy father
In manners, as in shape! thy blood and virtue...

9

I,1,72

Heaven bless him! Farewell, Bertram.

10

I,3,324

I will now hear; what say you of this gentlewoman?

11

I,3,330

What does this knave here? Get you gone, sirrah:
the complaints I have heard of you I do not all...

12

I,3,336

Well, sir.

13

I,3,341

Wilt thou needs be a beggar?

14

I,3,343

In what case?

15

I,3,348

Tell me thy reason why thou wilt marry.

16

I,3,351

Is this all your worship's reason?

17

I,3,354

May the world know them?

18

I,3,358

Thy marriage, sooner than thy wickedness.

19

I,3,361

Such friends are thine enemies, knave.

20

I,3,376

Wilt thou ever be a foul-mouthed and calumnious knave?

21

I,3,383

Get you gone, sir; I'll talk with you more anon.

22

I,3,386

Sirrah, tell my gentlewoman I would speak with her;
Helen, I mean.

23

I,3,398

What, one good in ten? you corrupt the song, sirrah.

24

I,3,407

You'll be gone, sir knave, and do as I command you.

25

I,3,414

Well, now.

26

I,3,416

Faith, I do: her father bequeathed her to me; and
she herself, without other advantage, may lawfully...

27

I,3,437

You have discharged this honestly; keep it to
yourself: many likelihoods informed me of this...

28

I,3,455

You know, Helen,
I am a mother to you.

29

I,3,458

Nay, a mother:
Why not a mother? When I said 'a mother,'...

30

I,3,474

I say, I am your mother.

31

I,3,482

Nor I your mother?

32

I,3,489

Yes, Helen, you might be my daughter-in-law:
God shield you mean it not! daughter and mother...

33

I,3,509

Do you love my son?

34

I,3,511

Love you my son?

35

I,3,513

Go not about; my love hath in't a bond,
Whereof the world takes note: come, come, disclose...

36

I,3,544

Had you not lately an intent,—speak truly,—
To go to Paris?

37

I,3,547

Wherefore? tell true.

38

I,3,559

This was your motive
For Paris, was it? speak.

39

I,3,565

But think you, Helen,
If you should tender your supposed aid,...

40

I,3,581

Dost thou believe't?

41

I,3,583

Why, Helen, thou shalt have my leave and love,
Means and attendants and my loving greetings...

42

II,2,825

Come on, sir; I shall now put you to the height of
your breeding.

43

II,2,829

To the court! why, what place make you special,
when you put off that with such contempt? But to the court!

44

II,2,838

Marry, that's a bountiful answer that fits all
questions.

45

II,2,843

Will your answer serve fit to all questions?

46

II,2,851

Have you, I say, an answer of such fitness for all
questions?

47

II,2,855

It must be an answer of most monstrous size that
must fit all demands.

48

II,2,861

To be young again, if we could: I will be a fool in
question, hoping to be the wiser by your answer. I...

49

II,2,866

Sir, I am a poor friend of yours, that loves you.

50

II,2,868

I think, sir, you can eat none of this homely meat.

51

II,2,870

You were lately whipped, sir, as I think.

52

II,2,872

Do you cry, 'O Lord, sir!' at your whipping, and
'spare not me?' Indeed your 'O Lord, sir!' is very...

53

II,2,878

I play the noble housewife with the time
To entertain't so merrily with a fool.

54

II,2,881

An end, sir; to your business. Give Helen this,
And urge her to a present answer back:...

55

II,2,886

Not much employment for you: you understand me?

56

II,2,888

Haste you again.

57

III,2,1398

It hath happened all as I would have had it, save
that he comes not along with her.

58

III,2,1402

By what observance, I pray you?

59

III,2,1407

Let me see what he writes, and when he means to come.

60

III,2,1414

What have we here?

61

III,2,1417

[Reads] I have sent you a daughter-in-law: she hath
recovered the king, and undone me. I have wedded...

62

III,2,1433

What is the matter?

63

III,2,1437

Why should he be killed?

64

III,2,1448

Think upon patience. Pray you, gentlemen,
I have felt so many quirks of joy and grief,...

65

III,2,1463

Brought you this letter, gentlemen?

66

III,2,1466

I prithee, lady, have a better cheer;
If thou engrossest all the griefs are thine,...

67

III,2,1472

And to be a soldier?

68

III,2,1476

Return you thither?

69

III,2,1480

Find you that there?

70

III,2,1484

Nothing in France, until he have no wife!
There's nothing here that is too good for him...

71

III,2,1491

Parolles, was it not?

72

III,2,1493

A very tainted fellow, and full of wickedness.
My son corrupts a well-derived nature...

73

III,2,1499

You're welcome, gentlemen.
I will entreat you, when you see my son,...

74

III,2,1506

Not so, but as we change our courtesies.
Will you draw near!

75

III,4,1559

Alas! and would you take the letter of her?
Might you not know she would do as she has done,...

76

III,4,1577

Ah, what sharp stings are in her mildest words!
Rinaldo, you did never lack advice so much,...

77

III,4,1586

What angel shall
Bless this unworthy husband? he cannot thrive,...

78

IV,5,2471

I would I had not known him; it was the death of the
most virtuous gentlewoman that ever nature had...

79

IV,5,2520

So he is. My lord that's gone made himself much
sport out of him: by his authority he remains here,...

80

IV,5,2534

With very much content, my lord; and I wish it
happily effected.

81

IV,5,2540

It rejoices me, that I hope I shall see him ere I
die. I have letters that my son will be here...

82

IV,5,2546

You need but plead your honourable privilege.

83

V,3,2677

'Tis past, my liege;
And I beseech your majesty to make it...

84

V,3,2753

Which better than the first, O dear heaven, bless!
Or, ere they meet, in me, O nature, cesse!

85

V,3,2777

Son, on my life,
I have seen her wear it; and she reckon'd it...

86

V,3,2851

Now, justice on the doers!

87

V,3,2899

He blushes, and 'tis it:
Of six preceding ancestors, that gem,...

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