Speeches (Lines) for Costard
in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 83

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,195

Sir, the contempts thereof are as touching me.

2

I,1,204

The matter is to me, sir, as concerning Jaquenetta.
The manner of it is, I was taken with the manner.

3

I,1,207

In manner and form following, sir; all those three:
I was seen with her in the manor-house, sitting with...

4

I,1,215

As it shall follow in my correction: and God defend
the right!

5

I,1,219

Such is the simplicity of man to hearken after the flesh.

6

I,1,223

Not a word of Costard yet.

7

I,1,225

It may be so: but if he say it is so, he is, in
telling true, but so.

8

I,1,228

Be to me and every man that dares not fight!

9

I,1,230

Of other men's secrets, I beseech you.

10

I,1,248

Me?

11

I,1,250

Me?

12

I,1,252

Still me?

13

I,1,254

O, me!

14

I,1,259

With a wench.

15

I,1,279

Sir, I confess the wench.

16

I,1,281

I do confess much of the hearing it but little of
the marking of it.

17

I,1,285

I was taken with none, sir: I was taken with a damsel.

18

I,1,287

This was no damsel, neither, sir; she was a virgin.

19

I,1,289

If it were, I deny her virginity: I was taken with a maid.

20

I,1,291

This maid will serve my turn, sir.

21

I,1,294

I had rather pray a month with mutton and porridge.

22

I,1,303

I suffer for the truth, sir; for true it is, I was
taken with Jaquenetta, and Jaquenetta is a true...

23

I,2,445

Well, sir, I hope, when I do it, I shall do it on a
full stomach.

24

I,2,448

I am more bound to you than your fellows, for they
are but lightly rewarded.

25

I,2,452

Let me not be pent up, sir: I will fast, being loose.

26

I,2,454

Well, if ever I do see the merry days of desolation
that I have seen, some shall see.

27

I,2,457

Nay, nothing, Master Moth, but what they look upon.
It is not for prisoners to be too silent in their...

28

III,1,835

No enigma, no riddle, no l'envoy; no salve in the
mail, sir: O, sir, plantain, a plain plantain! no...

29

III,1,863

The boy hath sold him a bargain, a goose, that's flat.
Sir, your pennyworth is good, an your goose be fat....

30

III,1,870

True, and I for a plantain: thus came your
argument in;...

31

III,1,876

Thou hast no feeling of it, Moth: I will speak that l'envoy:
I Costard, running out, that was safely within,...

32

III,1,880

Till there be more matter in the shin.

33

III,1,882

O, marry me to one Frances: I smell some l'envoy,
some goose, in this.

34

III,1,887

True, true; and now you will be my purgation and let me loose.

35

III,1,897

My sweet ounce of man's flesh! my incony Jew!
[Exit MOTH]...

36

III,1,908

Pray you, sir, how much carnation ribbon may a man
buy for a remuneration?

37

III,1,911

Marry, sir, halfpenny farthing.

38

III,1,913

I thank your worship: God be wi' you!

39

III,1,917

When would you have it done, sir?

40

III,1,919

Well, I will do it, sir: fare you well.

41

III,1,921

I shall know, sir, when I have done it.

42

III,1,923

I will come to your worship to-morrow morning.

43

III,1,933

Gardon, O sweet gardon! better than remuneration,
a'leven-pence farthing better: most sweet gardon! I...

44

IV,1,1015

God dig-you-den all! Pray you, which is the head lady?

45

IV,1,1017

Which is the greatest lady, the highest?

46

IV,1,1019

The thickest and the tallest! it is so; truth is truth.
An your waist, mistress, were as slender as my wit,...

47

IV,1,1024

I have a letter from Monsieur Biron to one Lady Rosaline.

48

IV,1,1078

I told you; my lord.

49

IV,1,1080

From my lord to my lady.

50

IV,1,1082

From my lord Biron, a good master of mine,
To a lady of France that he call'd Rosaline.

51

IV,1,1114

By my troth, most pleasant: how both did fit it!

52

IV,1,1119

Indeed, a' must shoot nearer, or he'll ne'er hit the clout.

53

IV,1,1121

Then will she get the upshoot by cleaving the pin.

54

IV,1,1123

She's too hard for you at pricks, sir: challenge her to bowl.

55

IV,1,1126

By my soul, a swain! a most simple clown!
Lord, Lord, how the ladies and I have put him down!...

56

IV,2,1233

Marry, master schoolmaster, he that is likest to a hogshead.

57

IV,2,1294

Have with thee, my girl.

58

IV,3,1525

Some certain treason.

59

IV,3,1527

Nay, it makes nothing, sir.

60

IV,3,1537

Of Dun Adramadio, Dun Adramadio.

61

IV,3,1556

Walk aside the true folk, and let the traitors stay.

62

V,1,1774

O, they have lived long on the alms-basket of words.
I marvel thy master hath not eaten thee for a word;...

63

V,1,1799

An I had but one penny in the world, thou shouldst
have it to buy gingerbread: hold, there is the very...

64

V,2,2415

O Lord, sir, they would know
Whether the three Worthies shall come in or no.

65

V,2,2418

No, sir; but it is vara fine,
For every one pursents three.

66

V,2,2421

Not so, sir; under correction, sir; I hope it is not so.
You cannot beg us, sir, I can assure you, sir we know...

67

V,2,2426

Under correction, sir, we know whereuntil it doth amount.

68

V,2,2428

O Lord, sir, it were pity you should get your living
by reckoning, sir.

69

V,2,2431

O Lord, sir, the parties themselves, the actors,
sir, will show whereuntil it doth amount: for mine...

70

V,2,2436

It pleased them to think me worthy of Pompion the
Great: for mine own part, I know not the degree of...

71

V,2,2440

We will turn it finely off, sir; we will take
some care.

72

V,2,2481

I Pompey am,—

73

V,2,2483

I Pompey am,—

74

V,2,2487

I Pompey am, Pompey surnamed the Big—

75

V,2,2489

It is, 'Great,' sir:—
Pompey surnamed the Great;...

76

V,2,2497

'Tis not so much worth; but I hope I was perfect: I
made a little fault in 'Great.'

77

V,2,2513

Your servant, and Costard.

78

V,2,2515

[To SIR NATHANIEL] O, sir, you have overthrown
Alisander the conqueror! You will be scraped out of...

79

V,2,2612

The party is gone, fellow Hector, she is gone; she
is two months on her way.

80

V,2,2615

Faith, unless you play the honest Troyan, the poor
wench is cast away: she's quick; the child brags in...

81

V,2,2620

Then shall Hector be whipped for Jaquenetta that is
quick by him and hanged for Pompey that is dead by...

82

V,2,2634

I will not fight with a pole, like a northern man:
I'll slash; I'll do it by the sword. I bepray you,...

83

V,2,2638

I'll do it in my shirt.

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