Speeches (Lines) for Clown
in "All's Well That Ends Well"

Total: 58

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,335

'Tis not unknown to you, madam, I am a poor fellow.

2

I,3,337

No, madam, 'tis not so well that I am poor, though
many of the rich are damned: but, if I may have
your ladyship's good will to go to the world, Isbel
the woman and I will do as we may.

3

I,3,342

I do beg your good will in this case.

4

I,3,344

In Isbel's case and mine own. Service is no
heritage: and I think I shall never have the
blessing of God till I have issue o' my body; for
they say barnes are blessings.

5

I,3,349

My poor body, madam, requires it: I am driven on
by the flesh; and he must needs go that the devil drives.

6

I,3,352

Faith, madam, I have other holy reasons such as they
are.

7

I,3,355

I have been, madam, a wicked creature, as you and
all flesh and blood are; and, indeed, I do marry
that I may repent.

8

I,3,359

I am out o' friends, madam; and I hope to have
friends for my wife's sake.

9

I,3,362

You're shallow, madam, in great friends; for the
knaves come to do that for me which I am aweary of.
He that ears my land spares my team and gives me
leave to in the crop; if I be his cuckold, he's my
drudge: he that comforts my wife is the cherisher
of my flesh and blood; he that cherishes my flesh
and blood loves my flesh and blood; he that loves my
flesh and blood is my friend: ergo, he that kisses
my wife is my friend. If men could be contented to
be what they are, there were no fear in marriage;
for young Charbon the Puritan and old Poysam the
Papist, howsome'er their hearts are severed in
religion, their heads are both one; they may jowl
horns together, like any deer i' the herd.

10

I,3,377

A prophet I, madam; and I speak the truth the next
way:
For I the ballad will repeat,
Which men full true shall find;
Your marriage comes by destiny,
Your cuckoo sings by kind.

11

I,3,388

Was this fair face the cause, quoth she,
Why the Grecians sacked Troy?
Fond done, done fond,
Was this King Priam's joy?
With that she sighed as she stood,
With that she sighed as she stood,
And gave this sentence then;
Among nine bad if one be good,
Among nine bad if one be good,
There's yet one good in ten.

12

I,3,399

One good woman in ten, madam; which is a purifying
o' the song: would God would serve the world so all
the year! we'ld find no fault with the tithe-woman,
if I were the parson. One in ten, quoth a'! An we
might have a good woman born but one every blazing
star, or at an earthquake, 'twould mend the lottery
well: a man may draw his heart out, ere a' pluck
one.

13

I,3,408

That man should be at woman's command, and yet no
hurt done! Though honesty be no puritan, yet it
will do no hurt; it will wear the surplice of
humility over the black gown of a big heart. I am
going, forsooth: the business is for Helen to come hither.

14

II,2,827

I will show myself highly fed and lowly taught: I
know my business is but to the court.

15

II,2,831

Truly, madam, if God have lent a man any manners, he
may easily put it off at court: he that cannot make
a leg, put off's cap, kiss his hand and say nothing,
has neither leg, hands, lip, nor cap; and indeed
such a fellow, to say precisely, were not for the
court; but for me, I have an answer will serve all
men.

16

II,2,840

It is like a barber's chair that fits all buttocks,
the pin-buttock, the quatch-buttock, the brawn
buttock, or any buttock.

17

II,2,844

As fit as ten groats is for the hand of an attorney,
as your French crown for your taffeta punk, as Tib's
rush for Tom's forefinger, as a pancake for Shrove
Tuesday, a morris for May-day, as the nail to his
hole, the cuckold to his horn, as a scolding queen
to a wrangling knave, as the nun's lip to the
friar's mouth, nay, as the pudding to his skin.

18

II,2,853

From below your duke to beneath your constable, it
will fit any question.

19

II,2,857

But a trifle neither, in good faith, if the learned
should speak truth of it: here it is, and all that
belongs to't. Ask me if I am a courtier: it shall
do you no harm to learn.

20

II,2,864

O Lord, sir! There's a simple putting off. More,
more, a hundred of them.

21

II,2,867

O Lord, sir! Thick, thick, spare not me.

22

II,2,869

O Lord, sir! Nay, put me to't, I warrant you.

23

II,2,871

O Lord, sir! spare not me.

24

II,2,876

I ne'er had worse luck in my life in my 'O Lord,
sir!' I see things may serve long, but not serve ever.

25

II,2,880

O Lord, sir! why, there't serves well again.

26

II,2,885

Not much commendation to them.

27

II,2,887

Most fruitfully: I am there before my legs.

28

II,4,1206

She is not well; but yet she has her health: she's
very merry; but yet she is not well: but thanks be
given, she's very well and wants nothing i', the
world; but yet she is not well.

29

II,4,1212

Truly, she's very well indeed, but for two things.

30

II,4,1214

One, that she's not in heaven, whither God send her
quickly! the other that she's in earth, from whence
God send her quickly!

31

II,4,1223

So that you had her wrinkles and I her money,
I would she did as you say.

32

II,4,1226

Marry, you are the wiser man; for many a man's
tongue shakes out his master's undoing: to say
nothing, to do nothing, to know nothing, and to have
nothing, is to be a great part of your title; which
is within a very little of nothing.

33

II,4,1232

You should have said, sir, before a knave thou'rt a
knave; that's, before me thou'rt a knave: this had
been truth, sir.

34

II,4,1236

Did you find me in yourself, sir? or were you
taught to find me? The search, sir, was profitable;
and much fool may you find in you, even to the
world's pleasure and the increase of laughter.

35

III,2,1400

By my troth, I take my young lord to be a very
melancholy man.

36

III,2,1403

Why, he will look upon his boot and sing; mend the
ruff and sing; ask questions and sing; pick his
teeth and sing. I know a man that had this trick of
melancholy sold a goodly manor for a song.

37

III,2,1409

I have no mind to Isbel since I was at court: our
old ling and our Isbels o' the country are nothing
like your old ling and your Isbels o' the court:
the brains of my Cupid's knocked out, and I begin to
love, as an old man loves money, with no stomach.

38

III,2,1415

E'en that you have there.

39

III,2,1431

O madam, yonder is heavy news within between two
soldiers and my young lady!

40

III,2,1434

Nay, there is some comfort in the news, some
comfort; your son will not be killed so soon as I
thought he would.

41

III,2,1438

So say I, madam, if he run away, as I hear he does:
the danger is in standing to't; that's the loss of
men, though it be the getting of children. Here
they come will tell you more: for my part, I only
hear your son was run away.

42

IV,5,2478

Indeed, sir, she was the sweet marjoram of the
salad, or rather, the herb of grace.

43

IV,5,2481

I am no great Nebuchadnezzar, sir; I have not much
skill in grass.

44

IV,5,2484

A fool, sir, at a woman's service, and a knave at a man's.

45

IV,5,2486

I would cozen the man of his wife and do his service.

46

IV,5,2488

And I would give his wife my bauble, sir, to do her service.

47

IV,5,2490

At your service.

48

IV,5,2492

Why, sir, if I cannot serve you, I can serve as
great a prince as you are.

49

IV,5,2495

Faith, sir, a' has an English name; but his fisnomy
is more hotter in France than there.

50

IV,5,2498

The black prince, sir; alias, the prince of
darkness; alias, the devil.

51

IV,5,2503

I am a woodland fellow, sir, that always loved a
great fire; and the master I speak of ever keeps a
good fire. But, sure, he is the prince of the
world; let his nobility remain in's court. I am for
the house with the narrow gate, which I take to be
too little for pomp to enter: some that humble
themselves may; but the many will be too chill and
tender, and they'll be for the flowery way that
leads to the broad gate and the great fire.

52

IV,5,2516

If I put any tricks upon 'em, sir, they shall be
jades' tricks; which are their own right by the law of nature.

53

IV,5,2550

O madam, yonder's my lord your son with a patch of
velvet on's face: whether there be a scar under't
or no, the velvet knows; but 'tis a goodly patch of
velvet: his left cheek is a cheek of two pile and a
half, but his right cheek is worn bare.

54

IV,5,2557

But it is your carbonadoed face.

55

IV,5,2560

Faith there's a dozen of 'em, with delicate fine
hats and most courteous feathers, which bow the head
and nod at every man.

56

V,2,2619

Truly, fortune's displeasure is but sluttish, if it
smell so strongly as thou speakest of: I will
henceforth eat no fish of fortune's buttering.
Prithee, allow the wind.

57

V,2,2625

Indeed, sir, if your metaphor stink, I will stop my
nose; or against any man's metaphor. Prithee, get
thee further.

58

V,2,2629

Foh! prithee, stand away: a paper from fortune's
close-stool to give to a nobleman! Look, here he
comes himself.
[Enter LAFEU]
Here is a purr of fortune's, sir, or of fortune's
cat,—but not a musk-cat,—that has fallen into the
unclean fishpond of her displeasure, and, as he
says, is muddied withal: pray you, sir, use the
carp as you may; for he looks like a poor, decayed,
ingenious, foolish, rascally knave. I do pity his
distress in my similes of comfort and leave him to
your lordship.

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