Speeches (Lines) for Cleopatra
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 204

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,18

If it be love indeed, tell me how much.

2

I,1,20

I'll set a bourn how far to be beloved.

3

I,1,25

Nay, hear them, Antony:
Fulvia perchance is angry; or, who knows...

4

I,1,32

Perchance! nay, and most like:
You must not stay here longer, your dismission...

5

I,1,49

Excellent falsehood!
Why did he marry Fulvia, and not love her?...

6

I,1,58

Hear the ambassadors.

7

I,2,157

Saw you my lord?

8

I,2,159

Was he not here?

9

I,2,161

He was disposed to mirth; but on the sudden
A Roman thought hath struck him. Enobarbus!

10

I,2,164

Seek him, and bring him hither.
Where's Alexas?

11

I,2,167

We will not look upon him: go with us.

12

I,3,295

Where is he?

13

I,3,297

See where he is, who's with him, what he does:
I did not send you: if you find him sad,...

14

I,3,305

What should I do, I do not?

15

I,3,307

Thou teachest like a fool; the way to lose him.

16

I,3,312

I am sick and sullen.

17

I,3,314

Help me away, dear Charmian; I shall fall:
It cannot be thus long, the sides of nature...

18

I,3,318

Pray you, stand further from me.

19

I,3,320

I know, by that same eye, there's some good news.
What says the married woman? You may go:...

20

I,3,326

O, never was there queen
So mightily betray'd! yet at the first...

21

I,3,330

Why should I think you can be mine and true,
Though you in swearing shake the throned gods,...

22

I,3,336

Nay, pray you, seek no colour for your going,
But bid farewell, and go: when you sued staying,...

23

I,3,345

I would I had thy inches; thou shouldst know
There were a heart in Egypt.

24

I,3,363

Though age from folly could not give me freedom,
It does from childishness: can Fulvia die?

25

I,3,369

O most false love!
Where be the sacred vials thou shouldst fill...

26

I,3,379

Cut my lace, Charmian, come;
But let it be: I am quickly ill, and well,...

27

I,3,385

So Fulvia told me.
I prithee, turn aside and weep for her,...

28

I,3,392

You can do better yet; but this is meetly.

29

I,3,394

And target. Still he mends;
But this is not the best. Look, prithee, Charmian,...

30

I,3,399

Courteous lord, one word.
Sir, you and I must part, but that's not it:...

31

I,3,408

'Tis sweating labour
To bear such idleness so near the heart...

32

I,5,521

Charmian!

33

I,5,523

Ha, ha!
Give me to drink mandragora.

34

I,5,526

That I might sleep out this great gap of time
My Antony is away.

35

I,5,529

O, 'tis treason!

36

I,5,531

Thou, eunuch Mardian!

37

I,5,533

Not now to hear thee sing; I take no pleasure
In aught an eunuch has: 'tis well for thee,...

38

I,5,538

Indeed!

39

I,5,543

O Charmian,
Where think'st thou he is now? Stands he, or sits he?...

40

I,5,562

How much unlike art thou Mark Antony!
Yet, coming from him, that great medicine hath...

41

I,5,569

Mine ear must pluck it thence.

42

I,5,579

What, was he sad or merry?

43

I,5,582

O well-divided disposition! Note him,
Note him good Charmian, 'tis the man; but note him:...

44

I,5,593

Who's born that day
When I forget to send to Antony,...

45

I,5,599

Be choked with such another emphasis!
Say, the brave Antony.

46

I,5,602

By Isis, I will give thee bloody teeth,
If thou with Caesar paragon again...

47

I,5,607

My salad days,
When I was green in judgment: cold in blood,...

48

II,5,1049

Give me some music; music, moody food
Of us that trade in love.

49

II,5,1053

Let it alone; let's to billiards: come, Charmian.

50

II,5,1055

As well a woman with an eunuch play'd
As with a woman. Come, you'll play with me, sir?

51

II,5,1058

And when good will is show'd, though't come
too short,...

52

II,5,1071

That time,—O times!—
I laugh'd him out of patience; and that night...

53

II,5,1082

Antonius dead!—If thou say so, villain,
Thou kill'st thy mistress: but well and free,...

54

II,5,1088

Why, there's more gold.
But, sirrah, mark, we use...

55

II,5,1094

Well, go to, I will;
But there's no goodness in thy face: if Antony...

56

II,5,1101

I have a mind to strike thee ere thou speak'st:
Yet if thou say Antony lives, is well,...

57

II,5,1107

Well said.

58

II,5,1109

Thou'rt an honest man.

59

II,5,1111

Make thee a fortune from me.

60

II,5,1113

I do not like 'But yet,' it does allay
The good precedence; fie upon 'But yet'!...

61

II,5,1122

For what good turn?

62

II,5,1124

I am pale, Charmian.

63

II,5,1126

The most infectious pestilence upon thee!

64

II,5,1129

What say you? Hence,
[Strikes him again]...

65

II,5,1138

Say 'tis not so, a province I will give thee,
And make thy fortunes proud: the blow thou hadst...

66

II,5,1144

Rogue, thou hast lived too long.

67

II,5,1151

Some innocents 'scape not the thunderbolt.
Melt Egypt into Nile! and kindly creatures...

68

II,5,1156

I will not hurt him.
[Exit CHARMIAN]...

69

II,5,1168

Is he married?
I cannot hate thee worser than I do,...

70

II,5,1172

The gods confound thee! dost thou hold there still?

71

II,5,1174

O, I would thou didst,
So half my Egypt were submerged and made...

72

II,5,1180

He is married?

73

II,5,1184

O, that his fault should make a knave of thee,
That art not what thou'rt sure of! Get thee hence:...

74

II,5,1191

In praising Antony, I have dispraised Caesar.

75

II,5,1193

I am paid for't now.
Lead me from hence:...

76

III,3,1682

Where is the fellow?

77

III,3,1684

Go to, go to.
[Enter the Messenger as before]...

78

III,3,1690

That Herod's head
I'll have: but how, when Antony is gone...

79

III,3,1694

Didst thou behold Octavia?

80

III,3,1696

Where?

81

III,3,1700

Is she as tall as me?

82

III,3,1702

Didst hear her speak? is she shrill-tongued or low?

83

III,3,1704

That's not so good: he cannot like her long.

84

III,3,1706

I think so, Charmian: dull of tongue, and dwarfish!
What majesty is in her gait? Remember,...

85

III,3,1713

Is this certain?

86

III,3,1717

He's very knowing;
I do perceive't: there's nothing in her yet:...

87

III,3,1721

Guess at her years, I prithee.

88

III,3,1724

Widow! Charmian, hark.

89

III,3,1726

Bear'st thou her face in mind? is't long or round?

90

III,3,1728

For the most part, too, they are foolish that are so.
Her hair, what colour?

91

III,3,1732

There's gold for thee.
Thou must not take my former sharpness ill:...

92

III,3,1739

Indeed, he is so: I repent me much
That so I harried him. Why, methinks, by him,...

93

III,3,1743

The man hath seen some majesty, and should know.

94

III,3,1746

I have one thing more to ask him yet, good Charmian:
But 'tis no matter; thou shalt bring him to me...

95

III,7,1936

I will be even with thee, doubt it not.

96

III,7,1938

Thou hast forspoke my being in these wars,
And say'st it is not fit.

97

III,7,1941

If not denounced against us, why should not we
Be there in person?

98

III,7,1947

What is't you say?

99

III,7,1955

Sink Rome, and their tongues rot
That speak against us! A charge we bear i' the war,...

100

III,7,1967

Celerity is never more admired
Than by the negligent.

101

III,7,1973

By sea! what else?

102

III,7,1998

I have sixty sails, Caesar none better.

103

III,11,2142

Let me sit down. O Juno!

104

III,11,2155

Ah, stand by.

105

III,11,2159

Well then, sustain him: O!

106

III,11,2170

O my lord, my lord,
Forgive my fearful sails! I little thought...

107

III,11,2179

O, my pardon!

108

III,11,2188

Pardon, pardon!

109

III,13,2244

What shall we do, Enobarbus?

110

III,13,2246

Is Antony or we in fault for this?

111

III,13,2257

Prithee, peace.

112

III,13,2268

That head, my lord?

113

III,13,2290

What, no more ceremony? See, my women!
Against the blown rose may they stop their nose...

114

III,13,2301

Caesar's will?

115

III,13,2303

None but friends: say boldly.

116

III,13,2313

Go on: right royal.

117

III,13,2316

O!

118

III,13,2320

He is a god, and knows
What is most right: mine honour was not yielded,...

119

III,13,2336

What's your name?

120

III,13,2338

Most kind messenger,
Say to great Caesar this: in deputation...

121

III,13,2349

Your Caesar's father oft,
When he hath mused of taking kingdoms in,...

122

III,13,2387

Good my lord,—

123

III,13,2394

O, is't come to this?

124

III,13,2402

Wherefore is this?

125

III,13,2437

Have you done yet?

126

III,13,2441

I must stay his time.

127

III,13,2444

Not know me yet?

128

III,13,2446

Ah, dear, if I be so,
From my cold heart let heaven engender hail,...

129

III,13,2466

That's my brave lord!

130

III,13,2475

It is my birth-day:
I had thought to have held it poor: but, since my lord...

131

III,13,2479

Call all his noble captains to my lord.

132

IV,2,2535

[Aside to DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS] What means this?

133

IV,2,2549

[Aside to DOMITIUS ENOBARBUS] What does he mean?

134

IV,4,2620

Sleep a little.

135

IV,4,2626

Nay, I'll help too.
What's this for?

136

IV,4,2630

Sooth, la, I'll help: thus it must be.

137

IV,4,2635

Is not this buckled well?

138

IV,4,2669

Lead me.
He goes forth gallantly. That he and Caesar might...

139

IV,8,2803

Lord of lords!
O infinite virtue, comest thou smiling from...

140

IV,8,2816

I'll give thee, friend,
An armour all of gold; it was a king's.

141

IV,12,2939

Why is my lord enraged against his love?

142

IV,13,2962

Help me, my women! O, he is more mad
Than Telamon for his shield; the boar of Thessaly...

143

IV,13,2969

To the monument!
Mardian, go tell him I have slain myself;...

144

IV,15,3163

O Charmian, I will never go from hence.

145

IV,15,3165

No, I will not:
All strange and terrible events are welcome,...

146

IV,15,3176

O sun,
Burn the great sphere thou movest in!...

147

IV,15,3185

So it should be, that none but Antony
Should conquer Antony; but woe 'tis so!

148

IV,15,3191

I dare not, dear,—
Dear my lord, pardon,—I dare not,...

149

IV,15,3204

Here's sport indeed! How heavy weighs my lord!
Our strength is all gone into heaviness,...

150

IV,15,3217

No, let me speak; and let me rail so high,
That the false housewife Fortune break her wheel,...

151

IV,15,3222

They do not go together.

152

IV,15,3225

My resolution and my hands I'll trust;
None about Caesar.

153

IV,15,3236

Noblest of men, woo't die?
Hast thou no care of me? shall I abide...

154

IV,15,3255

No more, but e'en a woman, and commanded
By such poor passion as the maid that milks...

155

V,2,3377

My desolation does begin to make
A better life. 'Tis paltry to be Caesar;...

156

V,2,3390

What's thy name?

157

V,2,3392

Antony
Did tell me of you, bade me trust you; but...

158

V,2,3410

Pray you, tell him
I am his fortune's vassal, and I send him...

159

V,2,3428

Quick, quick, good hands.

160

V,2,3434

What, of death too,
That rids our dogs of languish?

161

V,2,3441

Where art thou, death?
Come hither, come! come, come, and take a queen...

162

V,2,3445

Sir, I will eat no meat, I'll not drink, sir;
If idle talk will once be necessary,...

163

V,2,3472

Say, I would die.

164

V,2,3475

I cannot tell.

165

V,2,3477

No matter, sir, what I have heard or known.
You laugh when boys or women tell their dreams;...

166

V,2,3481

I dream'd there was an Emperor Antony:
O, such another sleep, that I might see...

167

V,2,3485

His face was as the heavens; and therein stuck
A sun and moon, which kept their course,...

168

V,2,3490

His legs bestrid the ocean: his rear'd arm
Crested the world: his voice was propertied...

169

V,2,3502

Think you there was, or might be, such a man
As this I dream'd of?

170

V,2,3505

You lie, up to the hearing of the gods.
But, if there be, or ever were, one such,...

171

V,2,3517

I thank you, sir,
Know you what Caesar means to do with me?

172

V,2,3520

Nay, pray you, sir,—

173

V,2,3522

He'll lead me, then, in triumph?

174

V,2,3533

Sir, the gods
Will have it thus; my master and my lord...

175

V,2,3540

Sole sir o' the world,
I cannot project mine own cause so well...

176

V,2,3555

And may, through all the world: 'tis yours; and we,
Your scutcheons and your signs of conquest, shall...

177

V,2,3559

This is the brief of money, plate, and jewels,
I am possess'd of: 'tis exactly valued;...

178

V,2,3563

This is my treasurer: let him speak, my lord,
Upon his peril, that I have reserved...

179

V,2,3569

What have I kept back?

180

V,2,3573

See, Caesar! O, behold,
How pomp is follow'd! mine will now be yours;...

181

V,2,3583

O Caesar, what a wounding shame is this,
That thou, vouchsafing here to visit me,...

182

V,2,3604

Be it known, that we, the greatest, are misthought
For things that others do; and, when we fall,...

183

V,2,3619

My master, and my lord!

184

V,2,3622

He words me, girls, he words me, that I should not
Be noble to myself: but, hark thee, Charmian.

185

V,2,3627

Hie thee again:
I have spoke already, and it is provided;...

186

V,2,3635

Dolabella!

187

V,2,3643

Dolabella,
I shall remain your debtor.

188

V,2,3647

Farewell, and thanks.
[Exit DOLABELLA]...

189

V,2,3657

Nay, 'tis most certain, Iras: saucy lictors
Will catch at us, like strumpets; and scald rhymers...

190

V,2,3666

Nay, that's certain.

191

V,2,3669

Why, that's the way
To fool their preparation, and to conquer...

192

V,2,3686

Let him come in.
[Exit Guardsman]...

193

V,2,3696

Avoid, and leave him.
[Exit Guardsman]...

194

V,2,3704

Rememberest thou any that have died on't?

195

V,2,3714

Get thee hence; farewell.

196

V,2,3717

Farewell.

197

V,2,3720

Ay, ay; farewell.

198

V,2,3724

Take thou no care; it shall be heeded.

199

V,2,3727

Will it eat me?

200

V,2,3734

Well, get thee gone; farewell.

201

V,2,3738

Give me my robe, put on my crown; I have
Immortal longings in me: now no more...

202

V,2,3760

This proves me base:
If she first meet the curled Antony,...

203

V,2,3772

Peace, peace!
Dost thou not see my baby at my breast,...

204

V,2,3776

As sweet as balm, as soft as air, as gentle,—
O Antony!—Nay, I will take thee too....

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