Speeches (Lines) for Charmian
in "Antony and Cleopatra"

Total: 63

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,79

(stage directions). [Enter CHARMIAN, IRAS, ALEXAS, and a Soothsayer]

Charmian. Lord Alexas, sweet Alexas, most any thing Alexas,
almost most absolute Alexas, where's the soothsayer
that you praised so to the queen? O, that I knew
this husband, which, you say, must charge his horns
with garlands!


2

I,2,86

Soothsayer. Your will?

Charmian. Is this the man? Is't you, sir, that know things?


3

I,2,93

Domitius Enobarus. Bring in the banquet quickly; wine enough
Cleopatra's health to drink.

Charmian. Good sir, give me good fortune.


4

I,2,95

Soothsayer. I make not, but foresee.

Charmian. Pray, then, foresee me one.


5

I,2,97

Soothsayer. You shall be yet far fairer than you are.

Charmian. He means in flesh.


6

I,2,99

Iras. No, you shall paint when you are old.

Charmian. Wrinkles forbid!


7

I,2,101

Alexas. Vex not his prescience; be attentive.

Charmian. Hush!


8

I,2,103

Soothsayer. You shall be more beloving than beloved.

Charmian. I had rather heat my liver with drinking.


9

I,2,105

Alexas. Nay, hear him.

Charmian. Good now, some excellent fortune! Let me be married
to three kings in a forenoon, and widow them all:
let me have a child at fifty, to whom Herod of Jewry
may do homage: find me to marry me with Octavius
Caesar, and companion me with my mistress.


10

I,2,111

Soothsayer. You shall outlive the lady whom you serve.

Charmian. O excellent! I love long life better than figs.


11

I,2,114

Soothsayer. You have seen and proved a fairer former fortune
Than that which is to approach.

Charmian. Then belike my children shall have no names:
prithee, how many boys and wenches must I have?


12

I,2,118

Soothsayer. If every of your wishes had a womb.
And fertile every wish, a million.

Charmian. Out, fool! I forgive thee for a witch.


13

I,2,120

Alexas. You think none but your sheets are privy to your wishes.

Charmian. Nay, come, tell Iras hers.


14

I,2,125

Iras. There's a palm presages chastity, if nothing else.

Charmian. E'en as the o'erflowing Nilus presageth famine.


15

I,2,127

Iras. Go, you wild bedfellow, you cannot soothsay.

Charmian. Nay, if an oily palm be not a fruitful
prognostication, I cannot scratch mine ear. Prithee,
tell her but a worky-day fortune.


16

I,2,134

Iras. Am I not an inch of fortune better than she?

Charmian. Well, if you were but an inch of fortune better than
I, where would you choose it?


17

I,2,137

Iras. Not in my husband's nose.

Charmian. Our worser thoughts heavens mend! Alexas,—come,
his fortune, his fortune! O, let him marry a woman
that cannot go, sweet Isis, I beseech thee! and let
her die too, and give him a worse! and let worst
follow worse, till the worst of all follow him
laughing to his grave, fifty-fold a cuckold! Good
Isis, hear me this prayer, though thou deny me a
matter of more weight; good Isis, I beseech thee!


18

I,2,150

Iras. Amen. Dear goddess, hear that prayer of the people!
for, as it is a heartbreaking to see a handsome man
loose-wived, so it is a deadly sorrow to behold a
foul knave uncuckolded: therefore, dear Isis, keep
decorum, and fortune him accordingly!

Charmian. Amen.


19

I,2,155

Domitius Enobarus. Hush! here comes Antony.

Charmian. Not he; the queen.


20

I,2,160

Cleopatra. Was he not here?

Charmian. No, madam.


21

I,3,296

Cleopatra. Where is he?

Charmian. I did not see him since.


22

I,3,302

(stage directions). [Exit ALEXAS]

Charmian. Madam, methinks, if you did love him dearly,
You do not hold the method to enforce
The like from him.


23

I,3,306

Cleopatra. What should I do, I do not?

Charmian. In each thing give him way, cross him nothing.


24

I,3,308

Cleopatra. Thou teachest like a fool; the way to lose him.

Charmian. Tempt him not so too far; I wish, forbear:
In time we hate that which we often fear.
But here comes Antony.


25

I,5,522

Cleopatra. Charmian!

Charmian. Madam?


26

I,5,525

Cleopatra. Ha, ha!
Give me to drink mandragora.

Charmian. Why, madam?


27

I,5,528

Cleopatra. That I might sleep out this great gap of time
My Antony is away.

Charmian. You think of him too much.


28

I,5,530

Cleopatra. O, 'tis treason!

Charmian. Madam, I trust, not so.


29

I,5,598

Cleopatra. Who's born that day
When I forget to send to Antony,
Shall die a beggar. Ink and paper, Charmian.
Welcome, my good Alexas. Did I, Charmian,
Ever love Caesar so?

Charmian. O that brave Caesar!


30

I,5,601

Cleopatra. Be choked with such another emphasis!
Say, the brave Antony.

Charmian. The valiant Caesar!


31

I,5,605

Cleopatra. By Isis, I will give thee bloody teeth,
If thou with Caesar paragon again
My man of men.

Charmian. By your most gracious pardon,
I sing but after you.


32

II,5,1054

Cleopatra. Let it alone; let's to billiards: come, Charmian.

Charmian. My arm is sore; best play with Mardian.


33

II,5,1067

Cleopatra. And when good will is show'd, though't come
too short,
The actor may plead pardon. I'll none now:
Give me mine angle; we'll to the river: there,
My music playing far off, I will betray
Tawny-finn'd fishes; my bended hook shall pierce
Their slimy jaws; and, as I draw them up,
I'll think them every one an Antony,
And say 'Ah, ha! you're caught.'

Charmian. 'Twas merry when
You wager'd on your angling; when your diver
Did hang a salt-fish on his hook, which he
With fervency drew up.


34

II,5,1149

(stage directions). [Exit]

Charmian. Good madam, keep yourself within yourself:
The man is innocent.


35

II,5,1155

Cleopatra. Some innocents 'scape not the thunderbolt.
Melt Egypt into Nile! and kindly creatures
Turn all to serpents! Call the slave again:
Though I am mad, I will not bite him: call.

Charmian. He is afeard to come.


36

II,5,1190

(stage directions). [Exit Messenger]

Charmian. Good your highness, patience.


37

II,5,1192

Cleopatra. In praising Antony, I have dispraised Caesar.

Charmian. Many times, madam.


38

III,3,1705

Cleopatra. That's not so good: he cannot like her long.

Charmian. Like her! O Isis! 'tis impossible.


39

III,3,1715

Messenger. Or I have no observance.

Charmian. Three in Egypt
Cannot make better note.


40

III,3,1720

Cleopatra. He's very knowing;
I do perceive't: there's nothing in her yet:
The fellow has good judgment.

Charmian. Excellent.


41

III,3,1738

(stage directions). [Exit Messenger]

Charmian. A proper man.


42

III,3,1742

Cleopatra. Indeed, he is so: I repent me much
That so I harried him. Why, methinks, by him,
This creature's no such thing.

Charmian. Nothing, madam.


43

III,3,1744

Cleopatra. The man hath seen some majesty, and should know.

Charmian. Hath he seen majesty? Isis else defend,
And serving you so long!


44

III,3,1749

Cleopatra. I have one thing more to ask him yet, good Charmian:
But 'tis no matter; thou shalt bring him to me
Where I will write. All may be well enough.

Charmian. I warrant you, madam.


45

III,11,2141

Iras. Do, most dear queen.

Charmian. Do! why: what else?


46

III,11,2146

Antony. O fie, fie, fie!

Charmian. Madam!


47

IV,4,2668

(stage directions). [Exeunt MARK ANTONY, EROS, Captains, and Soldiers]

Charmian. Please you, retire to your chamber.


48

IV,13,2965

Cleopatra. Help me, my women! O, he is more mad
Than Telamon for his shield; the boar of Thessaly
Was never so emboss'd.

Charmian. To the monument!
There lock yourself, and send him word you are dead.
The soul and body rive not more in parting
Than greatness going off.


49

IV,15,3164

Cleopatra. O Charmian, I will never go from hence.

Charmian. Be comforted, dear madam.


50

IV,15,3248

(stage directions). [Faints]

Charmian. O, quietness, lady!


51

IV,15,3250

Iras. She is dead too, our sovereign.

Charmian. Lady!


52

IV,15,3252

Iras. Madam!

Charmian. O madam, madam, madam!


53

IV,15,3254

Iras. Royal Egypt, Empress!

Charmian. Peace, peace, Iras!


54

V,2,3427

Iras. Royal queen!

Charmian. O Cleopatra! thou art taken, queen:


55

V,2,3630

Cleopatra. Hie thee again:
I have spoke already, and it is provided;
Go put it to the haste.

Charmian. Madam, I will.


56

V,2,3633

Dolabella. Where is the queen?

Charmian. Behold, sir.


57

V,2,3758

Cleopatra. Give me my robe, put on my crown; I have
Immortal longings in me: now no more
The juice of Egypt's grape shall moist this lip:
Yare, yare, good Iras; quick. Methinks I hear
Antony call; I see him rouse himself
To praise my noble act; I hear him mock
The luck of Caesar, which the gods give men
To excuse their after wrath: husband, I come:
Now to that name my courage prove my title!
I am fire and air; my other elements
I give to baser life. So; have you done?
Come then, and take the last warmth of my lips.
Farewell, kind Charmian; Iras, long farewell.
[Kisses them. IRAS falls and dies]
Have I the aspic in my lips? Dost fall?
If thou and nature can so gently part,
The stroke of death is as a lover's pinch,
Which hurts, and is desired. Dost thou lie still?
If thus thou vanishest, thou tell'st the world
It is not worth leave-taking.

Charmian. Dissolve, thick cloud, and rain; that I may say,
The gods themselves do weep!


58

V,2,3771

Cleopatra. This proves me base:
If she first meet the curled Antony,
He'll make demand of her, and spend that kiss
Which is my heaven to have. Come, thou
mortal wretch,
[To an asp, which she applies to her breast]
With thy sharp teeth this knot intrinsicate
Of life at once untie: poor venomous fool
Be angry, and dispatch. O, couldst thou speak,
That I might hear thee call great Caesar ass
Unpolicied!

Charmian. O eastern star!


59

V,2,3775

Cleopatra. Peace, peace!
Dost thou not see my baby at my breast,
That sucks the nurse asleep?

Charmian. O, break! O, break!


60

V,2,3781

(stage directions). [Dies]

Charmian. In this vile world? So, fare thee well.
Now boast thee, death, in thy possession lies
A lass unparallel'd. Downy windows, close;
And golden Phoebus never be beheld
Of eyes again so royal! Your crown's awry;
I'll mend it, and then play.


61

V,2,3789

First Guard. Where is the queen?

Charmian. Speak softly, wake her not.


62

V,2,3791

First Guard. Caesar hath sent—

Charmian. Too slow a messenger.
[Applies an asp]
O, come apace, dispatch! I partly feel thee.


63

V,2,3797

First Guard. What work is here! Charmian, is this well done?

Charmian. It is well done, and fitting for a princess
Descended of so many royal kings.
Ah, soldier!


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