Speeches (Lines) for Cassius
in "Julius Caesar"

Total: 140

---
# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,107

Fellow, come from the throng; look upon Caesar.

2

I,2,112

Will you go see the order of the course?

3

I,2,114

I pray you, do.

4

I,2,119

Brutus, I do observe you now of late:
I have not from your eyes that gentleness...

5

I,2,136

Then, Brutus, I have much mistook your passion;
By means whereof this breast of mine hath buried...

6

I,2,142

'Tis just:
And it is very much lamented, Brutus,...

7

I,2,154

Therefore, good Brutus, be prepared to hear:
And since you know you cannot see yourself...

8

I,2,170

Ay, do you fear it?
Then must I think you would not have it so.

9

I,2,180

I know that virtue to be in you, Brutus,
As well as I do know your outward favour....

10

I,2,226

Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men...

11

I,2,267

I am glad that my weak words
Have struck but thus much show of fire from Brutus.

12

I,2,270

As they pass by, pluck Casca by the sleeve;
And he will, after his sour fashion, tell you...

13

I,2,281

Casca will tell us what the matter is.

14

I,2,318

They shouted thrice: what was the last cry for?

15

I,2,324

Who offered him the crown?

16

I,2,344

But, soft, I pray you: what, did Caesar swound?

17

I,2,348

No, Caesar hath it not; but you and I,
And honest Casca, we have the falling sickness.

18

I,2,371

Did Cicero say any thing?

19

I,2,373

To what effect?

20

I,2,382

Will you sup with me to-night, Casca?

21

I,2,384

Will you dine with me to-morrow?

22

I,2,387

Good: I will expect you.

23

I,2,392

So is he now in execution
Of any bold or noble enterprise,...

24

I,2,402

I will do so: till then, think of the world.
[Exit BRUTUS]...

25

I,3,465

Who's there?

26

I,3,467

Casca, by your voice.

27

I,3,469

A very pleasing night to honest men.

28

I,3,471

Those that have known the earth so full of faults.
For my part, I have walk'd about the streets,...

29

I,3,483

You are dull, Casca, and those sparks of life
That should be in a Roman you do want,...

30

I,3,506

Let it be who it is: for Romans now
Have thews and limbs like to their ancestors;...

31

I,3,515

I know where I will wear this dagger then;
Cassius from bondage will deliver Cassius:...

32

I,3,531

And why should Caesar be a tyrant then?
Poor man! I know he would not be a wolf,...

33

I,3,549

There's a bargain made.
Now know you, Casca, I have moved already...

34

I,3,561

'Tis Cinna; I do know him by his gait;
He is a friend....

35

I,3,566

No, it is Casca; one incorporate
To our attempts. Am I not stay'd for, Cinna?

36

I,3,570

Am I not stay'd for? tell me.

37

I,3,574

Be you content: good Cinna, take this paper,
And look you lay it in the praetor's chair,...

38

I,3,584

That done, repair to Pompey's theatre.
[Exit CINNA]...

39

I,3,594

Him and his worth and our great need of him
You have right well conceited. Let us go,...

40

II,1,701

I think we are too bold upon your rest:
Good morrow, Brutus; do we trouble you?

41

II,1,705

Yes, every man of them, and no man here
But honours you; and every one doth wish...

42

II,1,711

This, Decius Brutus.

43

II,1,713

This, Casca; this, Cinna; and this, Metellus Cimber.

44

II,1,717

Shall I entreat a word?

45

II,1,731

And let us swear our resolution.

46

II,1,759

But what of Cicero? shall we sound him?
I think he will stand very strong with us.

47

II,1,772

Then leave him out.

48

II,1,775

Decius, well urged: I think it is not meet,
Mark Antony, so well beloved of Caesar,...

49

II,1,804

Yet I fear him;
For in the ingrafted love he bears to Caesar—

50

II,1,815

The clock hath stricken three.

51

II,1,817

But it is doubtful yet,
Whether Caesar will come forth to-day, or no;...

52

II,1,836

Nay, we will all of us be there to fetch him.

53

II,1,845

The morning comes upon 's: we'll leave you, Brutus.
And, friends, disperse yourselves; but all remember...

54

III,1,1207

What, urge you your petitions in the street?
Come to the Capitol....

55

III,1,1212

What enterprise, Popilius?

56

III,1,1216

He wish'd to-day our enterprise might thrive.
I fear our purpose is discovered.

57

III,1,1219

Casca, be sudden, for we fear prevention.
Brutus, what shall be done? If this be known,...

58

III,1,1226

Trebonius knows his time; for, look you, Brutus.
He draws Mark Antony out of the way.

59

III,1,1260

Pardon, Caesar; Caesar, pardon:
As low as to thy foot doth Cassius fall,...

60

III,1,1263

I could be well moved, if I were as you:
If I could pray to move, prayers would move me:...

61

III,1,1290

Some to the common pulpits, and cry out
'Liberty, freedom, and enfranchisement!'

62

III,1,1303

And leave us, Publius; lest that the people,
Rushing on us, should do your age some mischief.

63

III,1,1308

Where is Antony?

64

III,1,1315

Why, he that cuts off twenty years of life
Cuts off so many years of fearing death.

65

III,1,1325

Stoop, then, and wash. How many ages hence
Shall this our lofty scene be acted over...

66

III,1,1331

So oft as that shall be,
So often shall the knot of us be call'd...

67

III,1,1335

Ay, every man away:
Brutus shall lead; and we will grace his heels...

68

III,1,1363

I wish we may: but yet have I a mind
That fears him much; and my misgiving still...

69

III,1,1398

Your voice shall be as strong as any man's
In the disposing of new dignities.

70

III,1,1433

Mark Antony,—

71

III,1,1437

I blame you not for praising Caesar so;
But what compact mean you to have with us?...

72

III,1,1456

Brutus, a word with you.
[Aside to BRUTUS]...

73

III,1,1470

I know not what may fall; I like it not.

74

IV,2,1954

Stand, ho!

75

IV,2,1959

Most noble brother, you have done me wrong.

76

IV,2,1962

Brutus, this sober form of yours hides wrongs;
And when you do them—

77

IV,2,1971

Pindarus,
Bid our commanders lead their charges off...

78

IV,3,1979

That you have wrong'd me doth appear in this:
You have condemn'd and noted Lucius Pella...

79

IV,3,1985

In such a time as this it is not meet
That every nice offence should bear his comment.

80

IV,3,1991

I an itching palm!
You know that you are Brutus that speak this,...

81

IV,3,1996

Chastisement!

82

IV,3,2008

Brutus, bay not me;
I'll not endure it: you forget yourself,...

83

IV,3,2014

I am.

84

IV,3,2016

Urge me no more, I shall forget myself;
Have mind upon your health, tempt me no further.

85

IV,3,2019

Is't possible?

86

IV,3,2023

O ye gods, ye gods! must I endure all this?

87

IV,3,2033

Is it come to this?

88

IV,3,2038

You wrong me every way; you wrong me, Brutus;
I said, an elder soldier, not a better:...

89

IV,3,2042

When Caesar lived, he durst not thus have moved me.

90

IV,3,2044

I durst not!

91

IV,3,2046

What, durst not tempt him!

92

IV,3,2048

Do not presume too much upon my love;
I may do that I shall be sorry for.

93

IV,3,2068

I denied you not.

94

IV,3,2070

I did not: he was but a fool that brought
My answer back. Brutus hath rived my heart:...

95

IV,3,2075

You love me not.

96

IV,3,2077

A friendly eye could never see such faults.

97

IV,3,2080

Come, Antony, and young Octavius, come,
Revenge yourselves alone on Cassius,...

98

IV,3,2102

Hath Cassius lived
To be but mirth and laughter to his Brutus,...

99

IV,3,2106

Do you confess so much? Give me your hand.

100

IV,3,2108

O Brutus!

101

IV,3,2110

Have not you love enough to bear with me,
When that rash humour which my mother gave me...

102

IV,3,2122

How now! what's the matter?

103

IV,3,2126

Ha, ha! how vilely doth this cynic rhyme!

104

IV,3,2128

Bear with him, Brutus; 'tis his fashion.

105

IV,3,2132

Away, away, be gone.

106

IV,3,2136

And come yourselves, and bring Messala with you
Immediately to us.

107

IV,3,2141

I did not think you could have been so angry.

108

IV,3,2143

Of your philosophy you make no use,
If you give place to accidental evils.

109

IV,3,2146

Ha! Portia!

110

IV,3,2148

How 'scaped I killing when I cross'd you so?
O insupportable and touching loss!...

111

IV,3,2156

And died so?

112

IV,3,2158

O ye immortal gods!

113

IV,3,2162

My heart is thirsty for that noble pledge.
Fill, Lucius, till the wine o'erswell the cup;...

114

IV,3,2171

Portia, art thou gone?

115

IV,3,2185

Cicero one!

116

IV,3,2202

I have as much of this in art as you,
But yet my nature could not bear it so.

117

IV,3,2206

I do not think it good.

118

IV,3,2208

This it is:
'Tis better that the enemy seek us:...

119

IV,3,2223

Hear me, good brother.

120

IV,3,2236

Then, with your will, go on;
We'll along ourselves, and meet them at Philippi.

121

IV,3,2242

No more. Good night:
Early to-morrow will we rise, and hence.

122

IV,3,2251

O my dear brother!
This was an ill beginning of the night:...

123

IV,3,2256

Good night, my lord.

124

V,1,2371

Stand fast, Tintinius: we must out and talk.

125

V,1,2382

Antony,
The posture of your blows are yet unknown;...

126

V,1,2396

Flatterers! Now, Brutus, thank yourself:
This tongue had not offended so to-day,...

127

V,1,2412

A peevish schoolboy, worthless of such honour,
Join'd with a masker and a reveller!

128

V,1,2420

Why, now, blow wind, swell billow and swim bark!
The storm is up, and all is on the hazard.

129

V,1,2425

Messala!

130

V,1,2427

Messala,
This is my birth-day; as this very day...

131

V,1,2447

I but believe it partly;
For I am fresh of spirit and resolved...

132

V,1,2451

Now, most noble Brutus,
The gods to-day stand friendly, that we may,...

133

V,1,2467

Then, if we lose this battle,
You are contented to be led in triumph...

134

V,1,2479

For ever, and for ever, farewell, Brutus!
If we do meet again, we'll smile indeed;...

135

V,3,2497

O, look, Tintinius, look, the villains fly!
Myself have to mine own turn'd enemy:...

136

V,3,2509

This hill is far enough. Look, look, Tintinius;
Are those my tents where I perceive the fire?

137

V,3,2512

Tintinius, if thou lovest me,
Mount thou my horse, and hide thy spurs in him,...

138

V,3,2519

Go, Pindarus, get higher on that hill;
My sight was ever thick; regard Tintinius,...

139

V,3,2527

What news?

140

V,3,2535

Come down, behold no more.
O, coward that I am, to live so long,...

Return to the "Julius Caesar" menu

Plays + Sonnets + Poems + Concordance + Character Search + Advanced Search + About OSS