Speeches (Lines) for Caphis
in "Timon of Athens"

Total: 14

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

II,1,642

(stage directions). [Enter CAPHIS]

Caphis. Here, sir; what is your pleasure?


2

II,1,661

Senator. Get on your cloak, and haste you to Lord Timon;
Importune him for my moneys; be not ceased
With slight denial, nor then silenced when—
'Commend me to your master'—and the cap
Plays in the right hand, thus: but tell him,
My uses cry to me, I must serve my turn
Out of mine own; his days and times are past
And my reliances on his fracted dates
Have smit my credit: I love and honour him,
But must not break my back to heal his finger;
Immediate are my needs, and my relief
Must not be toss'd and turn'd to me in words,
But find supply immediate. Get you gone:
Put on a most importunate aspect,
A visage of demand; for, I do fear,
When every feather sticks in his own wing,
Lord Timon will be left a naked gull,
Which flashes now a phoenix. Get you gone.

Caphis. I go, sir.


3

II,1,664

Senator. 'I go, sir!'—Take the bonds along with you,
And have the dates in contempt.

Caphis. I will, sir.


4

II,2,678

(stage directions). [Enter CAPHIS, and the Servants of Isidore and Varro]

Caphis. Good even, Varro: what,
You come for money?


5

II,2,681

Caphis. Good even, Varro: what,
You come for money?

Caphis. It is: and yours too, Isidore?


6

II,2,683

Caphis. It is: and yours too, Isidore?

Caphis. Would we were all discharged!


7

II,2,685

Caphis. Would we were all discharged!

Caphis. Here comes the lord.


8

II,2,689

Timon. So soon as dinner's done, we'll forth again,
My Alcibiades. With me? what is your will?

Caphis. My lord, here is a note of certain dues.


9

II,2,691

Timon. Dues! Whence are you?

Caphis. Of Athens here, my lord.


10

II,2,693

Timon. Go to my steward.

Caphis. Please it your lordship, he hath put me off
To the succession of new days this month:
My master is awaked by great occasion
To call upon his own, and humbly prays you
That with your other noble parts you'll suit
In giving him his right.


11

II,2,701

Timon. Mine honest friend,
I prithee, but repair to me next morning.

Caphis. Nay, good my lord,—


12

II,2,706

Timon. Contain thyself, good friend.
He humbly prays your speedy payment.

Caphis. If you did know, my lord, my master's wants—
And I am sent expressly to your lordship.


13

II,2,730

(stage directions). [Enter APEMANTUS and Fool]

Caphis. Stay, stay, here comes the fool with Apemantus:
let's ha' some sport with 'em.


14

II,2,742

Apemantus. No, thou stand'st single, thou'rt not on him yet.

Caphis. Where's the fool now?


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