Speeches (Lines) for Caliban
in "Tempest"

Total: 50

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,460

[Within] There's wood enough within.

2

I,2,471

As wicked dew as e'er my mother brush'd
With raven's feather from unwholesome fen...

3

I,2,481

I must eat my dinner.
This island's mine, by Sycorax my mother,...

4

I,2,501

O ho, O ho! would't had been done!
Thou didst prevent me; I had peopled else...

5

I,2,517

You taught me language; and my profit on't
Is, I know how to curse. The red plague rid you...

6

I,2,527

No, pray thee.
[Aside]...

7

II,2,1082

All the infections that the sun sucks up
From bogs, fens, flats, on Prosper fall and make him...

8

II,2,1147

Do not torment me: Oh!

9

II,2,1155

The spirit torments me; Oh!

10

II,2,1162

Do not torment me, prithee; I'll bring my wood home faster.

11

II,2,1169

Thou dost me yet but little hurt; thou wilt anon, I
know it by thy trembling: now Prosper works upon thee.

12

II,2,1203

[Aside] These be fine things, an if they be
not sprites....

13

II,2,1213

I'll swear upon that bottle to be thy true subject;
for the liquor is not earthly.

14

II,2,1224

Hast thou not dropp'd from heaven?

15

II,2,1227

I have seen thee in her and I do adore thee:
My mistress show'd me thee and thy dog and thy bush.

16

II,2,1235

I'll show thee every fertile inch o' th' island;
And I will kiss thy foot: I prithee, be my god.

17

II,2,1239

I'll kiss thy foot; I'll swear myself thy subject.

18

II,2,1246

I'll show thee the best springs; I'll pluck thee berries;
I'll fish for thee and get thee wood enough....

19

II,2,1253

I prithee, let me bring thee where crabs grow;
And I with my long nails will dig thee pignuts;...

20

II,2,1264

[Sings drunkenly]
Farewell master; farewell, farewell!

21

II,2,1267

No more dams I'll make for fish
Nor fetch in firing...

22

III,2,1418

How does thy honour? Let me lick thy shoe.
I'll not serve him; he's not valiant.

23

III,2,1425

Lo, how he mocks me! wilt thou let him, my lord?

24

III,2,1427

Lo, lo, again! bite him to death, I prithee.

25

III,2,1431

I thank my noble lord. Wilt thou be pleased to
hearken once again to the suit I made to thee?

26

III,2,1436

As I told thee before, I am subject to a tyrant, a
sorcerer, that by his cunning hath cheated me of the island.

27

III,2,1439

Thou liest, thou jesting monkey, thou: I would my
valiant master would destroy thee! I do not lie.

28

III,2,1445

I say, by sorcery he got this isle;
From me he got it. if thy greatness will...

29

III,2,1450

Thou shalt be lord of it and I'll serve thee.

30

III,2,1453

Yea, yea, my lord: I'll yield him thee asleep,
Where thou mayst knock a nail into his bead.

31

III,2,1456

What a pied ninny's this! Thou scurvy patch!
I do beseech thy greatness, give him blows...

32

III,2,1476

Ha, ha, ha!

33

III,2,1479

Beat him enough: after a little time
I'll beat him too.

34

III,2,1482

Why, as I told thee, 'tis a custom with him,
I' th' afternoon to sleep: there thou mayst brain him,...

35

III,2,1500

Ay, lord; she will become thy bed, I warrant.
And bring thee forth brave brood.

36

III,2,1509

Within this half hour will he be asleep:
Wilt thou destroy him then?

37

III,2,1513

Thou makest me merry; I am full of pleasure:
Let us be jocund: will you troll the catch...

38

III,2,1522

That's not the tune.

39

III,2,1531

Art thou afeard?

40

III,2,1533

Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,
Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not....

41

III,2,1544

When Prospero is destroyed.

42

IV,1,1937

Pray you, tread softly, that the blind mole may not
Hear a foot fall: we now are near his cell.

43

IV,1,1947

Good my lord, give me thy favour still.
Be patient, for the prize I'll bring thee to...

44

IV,1,1958

Prithee, my king, be quiet. Seest thou here,
This is the mouth o' the cell: no noise, and enter....

45

IV,1,1966

Let it alone, thou fool; it is but trash.

46

IV,1,1972

The dropsy drown this fool I what do you mean
To dote thus on such luggage? Let's alone...

47

IV,1,1988

I will have none on't: we shall lose our time,
And all be turn'd to barnacles, or to apes...

48

V,1,2333

O Setebos, these be brave spirits indeed!
How fine my master is! I am afraid...

49

V,1,2351

I shall be pinch'd to death.

50

V,1,2370

Ay, that I will; and I'll be wise hereafter
And seek for grace. What a thrice-double ass...

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