Speeches (Lines) for Curio
in "Twelfth Night"

Total: 4

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,17

Orsino. If music be the food of love, play on;
Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting,
The appetite may sicken, and so die.
That strain again! it had a dying fall:
O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet sound,
That breathes upon a bank of violets,
Stealing and giving odour! Enough; no more:
'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.
O spirit of love! how quick and fresh art thou,
That, notwithstanding thy capacity
Receiveth as the sea, nought enters there,
Of what validity and pitch soe'er,
But falls into abatement and low price,
Even in a minute: so full of shapes is fancy
That it alone is high fantastical.

Curio. Will you go hunt, my lord?


2

I,1,19

Orsino. What, Curio?

Curio. The hart.


3

II,4,898

Orsino. Give me some music. Now, good morrow, friends.
Now, good Cesario, but that piece of song,
That old and antique song we heard last night:
Methought it did relieve my passion much,
More than light airs and recollected terms
Of these most brisk and giddy-paced times:
Come, but one verse.

Curio. He is not here, so please your lordship that should sing it.


4

II,4,900

Orsino. Who was it?

Curio. Feste, the jester, my lord; a fool that the lady
Olivia's father took much delight in. He is about the house.


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