Speeches (Lines) for Brutus
in "Julius Caesar"

Total: 194

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,105

A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.

2

I,2,113

Not I.

3

I,2,115

I am not gamesome: I do lack some part
Of that quick spirit that is in Antony....

4

I,2,124

Cassius,
Be not deceived: if I have veil'd my look,...

5

I,2,140

No, Cassius; for the eye sees not itself,
But by reflection, by some other things.

6

I,2,151

Into what dangers would you lead me, Cassius,
That you would have me seek into myself...

7

I,2,168

What means this shouting? I do fear, the people
Choose Caesar for their king.

8

I,2,172

I would not, Cassius; yet I love him well.
But wherefore do you hold me here so long?...

9

I,2,223

Another general shout!
I do believe that these applauses are...

10

I,2,253

That you do love me, I am nothing jealous;
What you would work me to, I have some aim:...

11

I,2,269

The games are done and Caesar is returning.

12

I,2,274

I will do so. But, look you, Cassius,
The angry spot doth glow on Caesar's brow,...

13

I,2,309

Ay, Casca; tell us what hath chanced to-day,
That Caesar looks so sad.

14

I,2,312

I should not then ask Casca what had chanced.

15

I,2,316

What was the second noise for?

16

I,2,320

Was the crown offered him thrice?

17

I,2,326

Tell us the manner of it, gentle Casca.

18

I,2,347

'Tis very like: he hath the failing sickness.

19

I,2,355

What said he when he came unto himself?

20

I,2,369

And after that, he came, thus sad, away?

21

I,2,390

What a blunt fellow is this grown to be!
He was quick mettle when he went to school.

22

I,2,398

And so it is. For this time I will leave you:
To-morrow, if you please to speak with me,...

23

II,1,600

What, Lucius, ho!
I cannot, by the progress of the stars,...

24

II,1,607

Get me a taper in my study, Lucius:
When it is lighted, come and call me here.

25

II,1,611

It must be by his death: and for my part,
I know no personal cause to spurn at him,...

26

II,1,642

Get you to bed again; it is not day.
Is not to-morrow, boy, the ides of March?

27

II,1,645

Look in the calendar, and bring me word.

28

II,1,648

The exhalations whizzing in the air
Give so much light that I may read by them....

29

II,1,667

'Tis good. Go to the gate; somebody knocks.
[Exit LUCIUS]...

30

II,1,681

Is he alone?

31

II,1,683

Do you know them?

32

II,1,688

Let 'em enter.
[Exit LUCIUS]...

33

II,1,703

I have been up this hour, awake all night.
Know I these men that come along with you?

34

II,1,710

He is welcome hither.

35

II,1,712

He is welcome too.

36

II,1,714

They are all welcome.
What watchful cares do interpose themselves...

37

II,1,730

Give me your hands all over, one by one.

38

II,1,732

No, not an oath: if not the face of men,
The sufferance of our souls, the time's abuse,—...

39

II,1,769

O, name him not: let us not break with him;
For he will never follow any thing...

40

II,1,782

Our course will seem too bloody, Caius Cassius,
To cut the head off and then hack the limbs,...

41

II,1,806

Alas, good Cassius, do not think of him:
If he love Caesar, all that he can do...

42

II,1,814

Peace! count the clock.

43

II,1,837

By the eighth hour: is that the uttermost?

44

II,1,842

Now, good Metellus, go along by him:
He loves me well, and I have given him reasons;...

45

II,1,848

Good gentlemen, look fresh and merrily;
Let not our looks put on our purposes,...

46

II,1,861

Portia, what mean you? wherefore rise you now?
It is not for your health thus to commit...

47

II,1,884

I am not well in health, and that is all.

48

II,1,887

Why, so I do. Good Portia, go to bed.

49

II,1,906

Kneel not, gentle Portia.

50

II,1,916

You are my true and honourable wife,
As dear to me as are the ruddy drops...

51

II,1,931

O ye gods,
Render me worthy of this noble wife!...

52

II,1,944

Caius Ligarius, that Metellus spake of.
Boy, stand aside. Caius Ligarius! how?

53

II,1,947

O, what a time have you chose out, brave Caius,
To wear a kerchief! Would you were not sick!

54

II,1,951

Such an exploit have I in hand, Ligarius,
Had you a healthful ear to hear of it.

55

II,1,960

A piece of work that will make sick men whole.

56

II,1,962

That must we also. What it is, my Caius,
I shall unfold to thee, as we are going...

57

II,1,969

Follow me, then.

58

II,2,1099

Caesar, 'tis strucken eight.

59

II,2,1117

[Aside] That every like is not the same, O Caesar,
The heart of Brutus yearns to think upon!

60

III,1,1215

What said Popilius Lena?

61

III,1,1218

Look, how he makes to Caesar; mark him.

62

III,1,1223

Cassius, be constant:
Popilius Lena speaks not of our purposes;...

63

III,1,1231

He is address'd: press near and second him.

64

III,1,1256

I kiss thy hand, but not in flattery, Caesar;
Desiring thee that Publius Cimber may...

65

III,1,1292

People and senators, be not affrighted;
Fly not; stand stiff: ambition's debt is paid.

66

III,1,1296

Where's Publius?

67

III,1,1300

Talk not of standing. Publius, good cheer;
There is no harm intended to your person,...

68

III,1,1305

Do so: and let no man abide this deed,
But we the doers.

69

III,1,1312

Fates, we will know your pleasures:
That we shall die, we know; 'tis but the time...

70

III,1,1317

Grant that, and then is death a benefit:
So are we Caesar's friends, that have abridged...

71

III,1,1328

How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport,
That now on Pompey's basis lies along...

72

III,1,1339

Soft! who comes here? A friend of Antony's.

73

III,1,1355

Thy master is a wise and valiant Roman;
I never thought him worse....

74

III,1,1362

I know that we shall have him well to friend.

75

III,1,1366

But here comes Antony.
[Re-enter ANTONY]...

76

III,1,1385

O Antony, beg not your death of us.
Though now we must appear bloody and cruel,...

77

III,1,1400

Only be patient till we have appeased
The multitude, beside themselves with fear,...

78

III,1,1446

Or else were this a savage spectacle:
Our reasons are so full of good regard...

79

III,1,1455

You shall, Mark Antony.

80

III,1,1462

By your pardon;
I will myself into the pulpit first,...

81

III,1,1471

Mark Antony, here, take you Caesar's body.
You shall not in your funeral speech blame us,...

82

III,1,1481

Prepare the body then, and follow us.

83

III,2,1532

Then follow me, and give me audience, friends.
Cassius, go you into the other street,...

84

III,2,1545

Be patient till the last.
Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my...

85

III,2,1570

Then none have I offended. I have done no more to
Caesar than you shall do to Brutus. The question of...

86

III,2,1591

My countrymen,—

87

III,2,1594

Good countrymen, let me depart alone,
And, for my sake, stay here with Antony:...

88

IV,2,1918

Stand, ho!

89

IV,2,1920

What now, Lucilius! is Cassius near?

90

IV,2,1923

He greets me well. Your master, Pindarus,
In his own change, or by ill officers,...

91

IV,2,1931

He is not doubted. A word, Lucilius;
How he received you, let me be resolved.

92

IV,2,1937

Thou hast described
A hot friend cooling: ever note, Lucilius,...

93

IV,2,1950

Hark! he is arrived.
[Low march within]...

94

IV,2,1955

Stand, ho! Speak the word along.

95

IV,2,1960

Judge me, you gods! wrong I mine enemies?
And, if not so, how should I wrong a brother?

96

IV,2,1964

Cassius, be content.
Speak your griefs softly: I do know you well....

97

IV,2,1974

Lucilius, do you the like; and let no man
Come to our tent till we have done our conference....

98

IV,3,1984

You wronged yourself to write in such a case.

99

IV,3,1987

Let me tell you, Cassius, you yourself
Are much condemn'd to have an itching palm;...

100

IV,3,1994

The name of Cassius honours this corruption,
And chastisement doth therefore hide his head.

101

IV,3,1997

Remember March, the ides of March remember:
Did not great Julius bleed for justice' sake?...

102

IV,3,2013

Go to; you are not, Cassius.

103

IV,3,2015

I say you are not.

104

IV,3,2018

Away, slight man!

105

IV,3,2020

Hear me, for I will speak.
Must I give way and room to your rash choler?...

106

IV,3,2024

All this! ay, more: fret till your proud heart break;
Go show your slaves how choleric you are,...

107

IV,3,2034

You say you are a better soldier:
Let it appear so; make your vaunting true,...

108

IV,3,2041

If you did, I care not.

109

IV,3,2043

Peace, peace! you durst not so have tempted him.

110

IV,3,2045

No.

111

IV,3,2047

For your life you durst not!

112

IV,3,2050

You have done that you should be sorry for.
There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats,...

113

IV,3,2069

You did.

114

IV,3,2074

I do not, till you practise them on me.

115

IV,3,2076

I do not like your faults.

116

IV,3,2078

A flatterer's would not, though they do appear
As huge as high Olympus.

117

IV,3,2095

Sheathe your dagger:
Be angry when you will, it shall have scope;...

118

IV,3,2105

When I spoke that, I was ill-temper'd too.

119

IV,3,2107

And my heart too.

120

IV,3,2109

What's the matter?

121

IV,3,2113

Yes, Cassius; and, from henceforth,
When you are over-earnest with your Brutus,...

122

IV,3,2127

Get you hence, sirrah; saucy fellow, hence!

123

IV,3,2129

I'll know his humour, when he knows his time:
What should the wars do with these jigging fools?...

124

IV,3,2134

Lucilius and Tintinius, bid the commanders
Prepare to lodge their companies to-night.

125

IV,3,2139

Lucius, a bowl of wine!

126

IV,3,2142

O Cassius, I am sick of many griefs.

127

IV,3,2145

No man bears sorrow better. Portia is dead.

128

IV,3,2147

She is dead.

129

IV,3,2151

Impatient of my absence,
And grief that young Octavius with Mark Antony...

130

IV,3,2157

Even so.

131

IV,3,2160

Speak no more of her. Give me a bowl of wine.
In this I bury all unkindness, Cassius.

132

IV,3,2165

Come in, Tintinius!
[Exit LUCIUS]...

133

IV,3,2172

No more, I pray you.
Messala, I have here received letters,...

134

IV,3,2178

With what addition?

135

IV,3,2182

Therein our letters do not well agree;
Mine speak of seventy senators that died...

136

IV,3,2189

No, Messala.

137

IV,3,2191

Nothing, Messala.

138

IV,3,2193

Why ask you? hear you aught of her in yours?

139

IV,3,2195

Now, as you are a Roman, tell me true.

140

IV,3,2198

Why, farewell, Portia. We must die, Messala:
With meditating that she must die once,...

141

IV,3,2204

Well, to our work alive. What do you think
Of marching to Philippi presently?

142

IV,3,2207

Your reason?

143

IV,3,2213

Good reasons must, of force, give place to better.
The people 'twixt Philippi and this ground...

144

IV,3,2224

Under your pardon. You must note beside,
That we have tried the utmost of our friends,...

145

IV,3,2238

The deep of night is crept upon our talk,
And nature must obey necessity;...

146

IV,3,2244

Lucius!
[Enter LUCIUS]...

147

IV,3,2255

Every thing is well.

148

IV,3,2257

Good night, good brother.

149

IV,3,2259

Farewell, every one.
[Exeunt all but BRUTUS]...

150

IV,3,2264

What, thou speak'st drowsily?
Poor knave, I blame thee not; thou art o'er-watch'd....

151

IV,3,2271

I pray you, sirs, lie in my tent and sleep;
It may be I shall raise you by and by...

152

IV,3,2275

I will not have it so: lie down, good sirs;
It may be I shall otherwise bethink me....

153

IV,3,2281

Bear with me, good boy, I am much forgetful.
Canst thou hold up thy heavy eyes awhile,...

154

IV,3,2285

It does, my boy:
I trouble thee too much, but thou art willing.

155

IV,3,2288

I should not urge thy duty past thy might;
I know young bloods look for a time of rest.

156

IV,3,2291

It was well done; and thou shalt sleep again;
I will not hold thee long: if I do live,...

157

IV,3,2312

Why comest thou?

158

IV,3,2314

Well; then I shall see thee again?

159

IV,3,2316

Why, I will see thee at Philippi, then.
[Exit Ghost]...

160

IV,3,2322

He thinks he still is at his instrument.
Lucius, awake!

161

IV,3,2325

Didst thou dream, Lucius, that thou so criedst out?

162

IV,3,2327

Yes, that thou didst: didst thou see any thing?

163

IV,3,2329

Sleep again, Lucius. Sirrah Claudius!
[To VARRO]...

164

IV,3,2334

Why did you so cry out, sirs, in your sleep?

165

IV,3,2336

Ay: saw you any thing?

166

IV,3,2339

Go and commend me to my brother Cassius;
Bid him set on his powers betimes before,...

167

V,1,2370

They stand, and would have parley.

168

V,1,2376

Words before blows: is it so, countrymen?

169

V,1,2378

Good words are better than bad strokes, Octavius.

170

V,1,2387

O, yes, and soundless too;
For you have stol'n their buzzing, Antony,...

171

V,1,2406

Caesar, thou canst not die by traitors' hands,
Unless thou bring'st them with thee.

172

V,1,2410

O, if thou wert the noblest of thy strain,
Young man, thou couldst not die more honourable.

173

V,1,2422

Ho, Lucilius! hark, a word with you.

174

V,1,2450

Even so, Lucilius.

175

V,1,2459

Even by the rule of that philosophy
By which I did blame Cato for the death...

176

V,1,2470

No, Cassius, no: think not, thou noble Roman,
That ever Brutus will go bound to Rome;...

177

V,1,2482

Why, then, lead on. O, that a man might know
The end of this day's business ere it come!...

178

V,2,2488

Ride, ride, Messala, ride, and give these bills
Unto the legions on the other side....

179

V,3,2606

Where, where, Messala, doth his body lie?

180

V,3,2608

Tintinius' face is upward.

181

V,3,2610

O Julius Caesar, thou art mighty yet!
Thy spirit walks abroad and turns our swords...

182

V,3,2616

Are yet two Romans living such as these?
The last of all the Romans, fare thee well!...

183

V,4,2632

Yet, countrymen, O, yet hold up your heads!

184

V,4,2638

And I am Brutus, Marcus Brutus, I;
Brutus, my country's friend; know me for Brutus!

185

V,5,2671

Come, poor remains of friends, rest on this rock.

186

V,5,2674

Sit thee down, Clitus: slaying is the word;
It is a deed in fashion. Hark thee, Clitus.

187

V,5,2678

Peace then! no words.

188

V,5,2680

Hark thee, Dardanius.

189

V,5,2689

Come hither, good Volumnius; list a word.

190

V,5,2691

Why, this, Volumnius:
The ghost of Caesar hath appear'd to me...

191

V,5,2697

Nay, I am sure it is, Volumnius.
Thou seest the world, Volumnius, how it goes;...

192

V,5,2709

Farewell to you; and you; and you, Volumnius.
Strato, thou hast been all this while asleep;...

193

V,5,2723

Hence! I will follow.
[Exeunt CLITUS, DARDANIUS, and VOLUMNIUS]...

194

V,5,2731

Farewell, good Strato.
[Runs on his sword]...

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