Speeches (Lines) for Bottom
in "Midsummer Night's Dream"

Total: 59

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,2,266

You were best to call them generally, man by man,
according to the scrip.

2

I,2,272

First, good Peter Quince, say what the play treats
on, then read the names of the actors, and so grow...

3

I,2,277

A very good piece of work, I assure you, and a
merry. Now, good Peter Quince, call forth your...

4

I,2,281

Ready. Name what part I am for, and proceed.

5

I,2,283

What is Pyramus? a lover, or a tyrant?

6

I,2,285

That will ask some tears in the true performing of
it: if I do it, let the audience look to their...

7

I,2,310

An I may hide my face, let me play Thisby too, I'll
speak in a monstrous little voice. 'Thisne,...

8

I,2,315

Well, proceed.

9

I,2,327

Let me play the lion too: I will roar, that I will
do any man's heart good to hear me; I will roar,...

10

I,2,335

I grant you, friends, if that you should fright the
ladies out of their wits, they would have no more...

11

I,2,345

Well, I will undertake it. What beard were I best
to play it in?

12

I,2,348

I will discharge it in either your straw-colour
beard, your orange-tawny beard, your purple-in-grain...

13

I,2,362

We will meet; and there we may rehearse most
obscenely and courageously. Take pains; be perfect: adieu.

14

I,2,365

Enough; hold or cut bow-strings.

15

III,1,820

Are we all met?

16

III,1,825

Peter Quince,—

17

III,1,827

There are things in this comedy of Pyramus and
Thisby that will never please. First, Pyramus must...

18

III,1,833

Not a whit: I have a device to make all well.
Write me a prologue; and let the prologue seem to...

19

III,1,842

No, make it two more; let it be written in eight and eight.

20

III,1,845

Masters, you ought to consider with yourselves: to
bring in—God shield us!—a lion among ladies, is a...

21

III,1,851

Nay, you must name his name, and half his face must
be seen through the lion's neck: and he himself...

22

III,1,865

A calendar, a calendar! look in the almanac; find
out moonshine, find out moonshine.

23

III,1,868

Why, then may you leave a casement of the great
chamber window, where we play, open, and the moon...

24

III,1,878

Some man or other must present Wall: and let him
have some plaster, or some loam, or some rough-cast...

25

III,1,894

Thisby, the flowers of odious savours sweet,—

26

III,1,896

—odours savours sweet:
So hath thy breath, my dearest Thisby dear....

27

III,1,918

If I were fair, Thisby, I were only thine.

28

III,1,929

Why do they run away? this is a knavery of them to
make me afeard.

29

III,1,933

What do you see? you see an asshead of your own, do
you?

30

III,1,940

I see their knavery: this is to make an ass of me;
to fright me, if they could. But I will not stir...

31

III,1,951

[Sings]
The finch, the sparrow and the lark,...

32

III,1,964

Methinks, mistress, you should have little reason
for that: and yet, to say the truth, reason and...

33

III,1,970

Not so, neither: but if I had wit enough to get out
of this wood, I have enough to serve mine own turn.

34

III,1,1004

I cry your worship's mercy, heartily: I beseech your
worship's name.

35

III,1,1007

I shall desire you of more acquaintance, good Master
Cobweb: if I cut my finger, I shall make bold with...

36

III,1,1011

I pray you, commend me to Mistress Squash, your
mother, and to Master Peascod, your father. Good...

37

III,1,1016

Good Master Mustardseed, I know your patience well:
that same cowardly, giant-like ox-beef hath...

38

IV,1,1550

Where's Peaseblossom?

39

IV,1,1552

Scratch my head Peaseblossom. Where's Mounsieur Cobweb?

40

IV,1,1554

Mounsieur Cobweb, good mounsieur, get you your
weapons in your hand, and kill me a red-hipped...

41

IV,1,1563

Give me your neaf, Mounsieur Mustardseed. Pray you,
leave your courtesy, good mounsieur.

42

IV,1,1566

Nothing, good mounsieur, but to help Cavalery Cobweb
to scratch. I must to the barber's, monsieur; for...

43

IV,1,1573

I have a reasonable good ear in music. Let's have
the tongs and the bones.

44

IV,1,1576

Truly, a peck of provender: I could munch your good
dry oats. Methinks I have a great desire to a bottle...

45

IV,1,1581

I had rather have a handful or two of dried peas.
But, I pray you, let none of your people stir me: I...

46

IV,1,1762

[Awaking] When my cue comes, call me, and I will
answer: my next is, 'Most fair Pyramus.' Heigh-ho!...

47

IV,2,1809

Where are these lads? where are these hearts?

48

IV,2,1811

Masters, I am to discourse wonders: but ask me not
what; for if I tell you, I am no true Athenian. I...

49

IV,2,1815

Not a word of me. All that I will tell you is, that
the duke hath dined. Get your apparel together,...

50

V,1,2013

O grim-look'd night! O night with hue so black!
O night, which ever art when day is not!...

51

V,1,2027

No, in truth, sir, he should not. 'Deceiving me'
is Thisby's cue: she is to enter now, and I am to...

52

V,1,2036

I see a voice: now will I to the chink,
To spy an I can hear my Thisby's face. Thisby!

53

V,1,2039

Think what thou wilt, I am thy lover's grace;
And, like Limander, am I trusty still.

54

V,1,2042

Not Shafalus to Procrus was so true.

55

V,1,2044

O kiss me through the hole of this vile wall!

56

V,1,2046

Wilt thou at Ninny's tomb meet me straightway?

57

V,1,2114

Sweet Moon, I thank thee for thy sunny beams;
I thank thee, Moon, for shining now so bright;...

58

V,1,2133

O wherefore, Nature, didst thou lions frame?
Since lion vile hath here deflower'd my dear:...

59

V,1,2197

[Starting up] No assure you; the wall is down that
parted their fathers. Will it please you to see the...

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