Speeches (Lines) for Biron
in "Love's Labour's Lost"

Total: 159

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,35

I can but say their protestation over;
So much, dear liege, I have already sworn,...

2

I,1,52

Let me say no, my liege, an if you please:
I only swore to study with your grace...

3

I,1,56

By yea and nay, sir, then I swore in jest.
What is the end of study? let me know.

4

I,1,59

Things hid and barr'd, you mean, from common sense?

5

I,1,61

Come on, then; I will swear to study so,
To know the thing I am forbid to know:...

6

I,1,74

Why, all delights are vain; but that most vain,
Which with pain purchased doth inherit pain:...

7

I,1,99

The spring is near when green geese are a-breeding.

8

I,1,101

Fit in his place and time.

9

I,1,103

Something then in rhyme.

10

I,1,106

Well, say I am; why should proud summer boast
Before the birds have any cause to sing?...

11

I,1,115

No, my good lord; I have sworn to stay with you:
And though I have for barbarism spoke more...

12

I,1,123

[Reads] 'Item, That no woman shall come within a
mile of my court:' Hath this been proclaimed?

13

I,1,126

Let's see the penalty.
[Reads]...

14

I,1,130

Sweet lord, and why?

15

I,1,132

A dangerous law against gentility!
[Reads]...

16

I,1,146

So study evermore is overshot:
While it doth study to have what it would...

17

I,1,153

Necessity will make us all forsworn
Three thousand times within this three years' space;...

18

I,1,182

Armado is a most illustrious wight,
A man of fire-new words, fashion's own knight.

19

I,1,188

This, fellow: what wouldst?

20

I,1,192

This is he.

21

I,1,197

How low soever the matter, I hope in God for high words.

22

I,1,199

To hear? or forbear laughing?

23

I,1,202

Well, sir, be it as the style shall give us cause to
climb in the merriness.

24

I,1,206

In what manner?

25

I,1,214

For the following, sir?

26

I,1,218

As we would hear an oracle.

27

I,1,275

This is not so well as I looked for, but the best
that ever I heard.

28

I,1,300

I'll lay my head to any good man's hat,
These oaths and laws will prove an idle scorn....

29

II,1,603

Did not I dance with you in Brabant once?

30

II,1,605

I know you did.

31

II,1,607

You must not be so quick.

32

II,1,609

Your wit's too hot, it speeds too fast, 'twill tire.

33

II,1,611

What time o' day?

34

II,1,613

Now fair befall your mask!

35

II,1,615

And send you many lovers!

36

II,1,617

Nay, then will I be gone.

37

II,1,672

Lady, I will commend you to mine own heart.

38

II,1,674

I would you heard it groan.

39

II,1,676

Sick at the heart.

40

II,1,678

Would that do it good?

41

II,1,680

Will you prick't with your eye?

42

II,1,682

Now, God save thy life!

43

II,1,684

I cannot stay thanksgiving.

44

II,1,703

What's her name in the cap?

45

II,1,705

Is she wedded or no?

46

II,1,707

You are welcome, sir: adieu.

47

III,1,907

O, my good knave Costard! exceedingly well met.

48

III,1,910

What is a remuneration?

49

III,1,912

Why, then, three-farthing worth of silk.

50

III,1,914

Stay, slave; I must employ thee:
As thou wilt win my favour, good my knave,...

51

III,1,918

This afternoon.

52

III,1,920

Thou knowest not what it is.

53

III,1,922

Why, villain, thou must know first.

54

III,1,924

It must be done this afternoon.
Hark, slave, it is but this:...

55

III,1,937

And I, forsooth, in love! I, that have been love's whip;
A very beadle to a humorous sigh;...

56

IV,3,1319

The king he is hunting the deer; I am coursing
myself: they have pitched a toil; I am toiling in...

57

IV,3,1342

[Aside] Shot, by heaven! Proceed, sweet Cupid:
thou hast thumped him with thy bird-bolt under the...

58

IV,3,1366

Now, in thy likeness, one more fool appear!

59

IV,3,1369

Why, he comes in like a perjure, wearing papers.

60

IV,3,1371

One drunkard loves another of the name.

61

IV,3,1373

I could put thee in comfort. Not by two that I know:
Thou makest the triumviry, the corner-cap of society,...

62

IV,3,1379

O, rhymes are guards on wanton Cupid's hose:
Disfigure not his slop.

63

IV,3,1397

This is the liver-vein, which makes flesh a deity,
A green goose a goddess: pure, pure idolatry....

64

IV,3,1402

All hid, all hid; an old infant play.
Like a demigod here sit I in the sky....

65

IV,3,1409

O most profane coxcomb!

66

IV,3,1411

By earth, she is not, corporal, there you lie.

67

IV,3,1413

An amber-colour'd raven was well noted.

68

IV,3,1415

Stoop, I say;
Her shoulder is with child.

69

IV,3,1418

Ay, as some days; but then no sun must shine.

70

IV,3,1422

Amen, so I had mine: is not that a good word?

71

IV,3,1425

A fever in your blood! why, then incision
Would let her out in saucers: sweet misprision!

72

IV,3,1428

Once more I'll mark how love can vary wit.

73

IV,3,1481

Now step I forth to whip hypocrisy.
[Advancing]...

74

IV,3,1508

Not you to me, but I betray'd by you:
I, that am honest; I, that hold it sin...

75

IV,3,1521

I post from love: good lover, let me go.

76

IV,3,1540

A toy, my liege, a toy: your grace needs not fear it.

77

IV,3,1544

[To COSTARD] Ah, you whoreson loggerhead! you were
born to do me shame....

78

IV,3,1548

That you three fools lack'd me fool to make up the mess:
He, he, and you, and you, my liege, and I,...

79

IV,3,1553

True, true; we are four.
Will these turtles be gone?

80

IV,3,1558

Sweet lords, sweet lovers, O, let us embrace!
As true we are as flesh and blood can be:...

81

IV,3,1565

Did they, quoth you? Who sees the heavenly Rosaline,
That, like a rude and savage man of Inde,...

82

IV,3,1576

My eyes are then no eyes, nor I Biron:
O, but for my love, day would turn to night!...

83

IV,3,1592

Is ebony like her? O wood divine!
A wife of such wood were felicity....

84

IV,3,1601

Devils soonest tempt, resembling spirits of light.
O, if in black my lady's brows be deck'd,...

85

IV,3,1614

Your mistresses dare never come in rain,
For fear their colours should be wash'd away.

86

IV,3,1618

I'll prove her fair, or talk till doomsday here.

87

IV,3,1622

O, if the streets were paved with thine eyes,
Her feet were much too dainty for such tread!

88

IV,3,1627

Nothing so sure; and thereby all forsworn.

89

IV,3,1634

'Tis more than need.
Have at you, then, affection's men at arms....

90

IV,3,1712

Advance your standards, and upon them, lords;
Pell-mell, down with them! but be first advised,...

91

IV,3,1719

First, from the park let us conduct them thither;
Then homeward every man attach the hand...

92

IV,3,1728

Allons! allons! Sow'd cockle reap'd no corn;
And justice always whirls in equal measure:...

93

V,2,2052

[Aside to MOTH] Their eyes, villain, their eyes!

94

V,2,2057

[Aside to MOTH] Once to behold, rogue.

95

V,2,2063

Is this your perfectness? be gone, you rogue!

96

V,2,2070

Nothing but peace and gentle visitation.

97

V,2,2085

Tell her, we measure them by weary steps.

98

V,2,2090

We number nothing that we spend for you:
Our duty is so rich, so infinite,...

99

V,2,2128

White-handed mistress, one sweet word with thee.

100

V,2,2130

Nay then, two treys, and if you grow so nice,
Metheglin, wort, and malmsey: well run, dice!...

101

V,2,2135

One word in secret.

102

V,2,2137

Thou grievest my gall.

103

V,2,2139

Therefore meet.

104

V,2,2173

By heaven, all dry-beaten with pure scoff!

105

V,2,2233

This fellow pecks up wit as pigeons pease,
And utters it again when God doth please:...

106

V,2,2255

See where it comes! Behavior, what wert thou
Till this madman show'd thee? and what art thou now?...

107

V,2,2294

This jest is dry to me. Fair gentle sweet,
Your wit makes wise things foolish: when we greet,...

108

V,2,2301

I am a fool, and full of poverty.

109

V,2,2304

O, I am yours, and all that I possess!

110

V,2,2306

I cannot give you less.

111

V,2,2308

Where? when? what vizard? why demand you this?

112

V,2,2316

Thus pour the stars down plagues for perjury.
Can any face of brass hold longer out?...

113

V,2,2339

Yet I have a trick
Of the old rage: bear with me, I am sick;...

114

V,2,2348

Our states are forfeit: seek not to undo us.

115

V,2,2351

Peace! for I will not have to do with you.

116

V,2,2353

Speak for yourselves; my wit is at an end.

117

V,2,2386

Neither of either; I remit both twain.
I see the trick on't: here was a consent,...

118

V,2,2412

Lo, he is tilting straight! Peace! I have done.
[Enter COSTARD]...

119

V,2,2417

What, are there but three?

120

V,2,2420

And three times thrice is nine.

121

V,2,2425

Is not nine.

122

V,2,2427

By Jove, I always took three threes for nine.

123

V,2,2430

How much is it?

124

V,2,2435

Art thou one of the Worthies?

125

V,2,2439

Go, bid them prepare.

126

V,2,2444

We are shame-proof, my lord: and tis some policy
To have one show worse than the king's and his company.

127

V,2,2453

A right description of our sport, my lord.

128

V,2,2459

Why ask you?

129

V,2,2473

There is five in the first show.

130

V,2,2475

The pedant, the braggart, the hedge-priest, the fool
and the boy:—...

131

V,2,2485

Well said, old mocker: I must needs be friends
with thee.

132

V,2,2499

My hat to a halfpenny, Pompey proves the best Worthy.

133

V,2,2507

Your nose smells 'no' in this, most tender-smelling knight.

134

V,2,2512

Pompey the Great,—

135

V,2,2514

Take away the conqueror, take away Alisander.

136

V,2,2542

A kissing traitor. How art thou proved Judas?

137

V,2,2548

Well followed: Judas was hanged on an elder.

138

V,2,2550

Because thou hast no face.

139

V,2,2554

A Death's face in a ring.

140

V,2,2558

Saint George's half-cheek in a brooch.

141

V,2,2560

Ay, and worn in the cap of a tooth-drawer.
And now forward; for we have put thee in countenance.

142

V,2,2563

False; we have given thee faces.

143

V,2,2565

An thou wert a lion, we would do so.

144

V,2,2569

For the ass to the Jude; give it him:—Jud-as, away!

145

V,2,2575

Hide thy head, Achilles: here comes Hector in arms.

146

V,2,2583

This cannot be Hector.

147

V,2,2588

A lemon.

148

V,2,2625

Greater than great, great, great, great Pompey!
Pompey the Huge!

149

V,2,2628

Pompey is moved. More Ates, more Ates! stir them
on! stir them on!

150

V,2,2631

Ay, if a' have no man's blood in's belly than will
sup a flea.

151

V,2,2647

What reason have you for't?

152

V,2,2662

Worthies, away! the scene begins to cloud.

153

V,2,2693

Honest plain words best pierce the ear of grief;
And by these badges understand the king....

154

V,2,2759

[And what to me, my love? and what to me?

155

V,2,2780

Studies my lady? mistress, look on me;
Behold the window of my heart, mine eye,...

156

V,2,2798

To move wild laughter in the throat of death?
It cannot be; it is impossible:...

157

V,2,2813

A twelvemonth! well; befall what will befall,
I'll jest a twelvemonth in an hospital.

158

V,2,2817

Our wooing doth not end like an old play;
Jack hath not Jill: these ladies' courtesy...

159

V,2,2822

That's too long for a play.

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