Speeches (Lines) for Belarius
in "Cymbeline"

Total: 58

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,3,1602

A goodly day not to keep house, with such
Whose roof's as low as ours! Stoop, boys; this gate...

2

III,3,1613

Now for our mountain sport: up to yond hill;
Your legs are young; I'll tread these flats. Consider,...

3

III,3,1649

How you speak!
Did you but know the city's usuries...

4

III,3,1672

My fault being nothing—as I have told you oft—
But that two villains, whose false oaths prevail'd...

5

III,6,2174

You, Polydote, have proved best woodman and
Are master of the feast: Cadwal and I...

6

III,6,2187

[Looking into the cave]
Stay; come not in....

7

III,6,2192

By Jupiter, an angel! or, if not,
An earthly paragon! Behold divineness...

8

III,6,2212

Whither bound?

9

III,6,2214

What's your name?

10

III,6,2219

Prithee, fair youth,
Think us no churls, nor measure our good minds...

11

III,6,2240

He wrings at some distress.

12

III,6,2244

Hark, boys.

13

III,6,2254

It shall be so.
Boys, we'll go dress our hunt. Fair youth, come in:...

14

IV,2,2316

[To IMOGEN] You are not well: remain here in the cave;
We'll come to you after hunting.

15

IV,2,2337

What! how! how!

16

IV,2,2344

[Aside]. O noble strain!
O worthiness of nature! breed of greatness!...

17

IV,2,2368

To the field, to the field!
We'll leave you for this time: go in and rest.

18

IV,2,2371

Pray, be not sick,
For you must be our housewife.

19

IV,2,2375

And shalt be ever.
[Exit IMOGEN, to the cave]...

20

IV,2,2396

It is great morning. Come, away!—
Who's there?

21

IV,2,2401

'Those runagates!'
Means he not us? I partly know him: 'tis...

22

IV,2,2456

No companies abroad?

23

IV,2,2458

I cannot tell: long is it since I saw him,
But time hath nothing blurr'd those lines of favour...

24

IV,2,2466

Being scarce made up,
I mean, to man, he had not apprehension...

25

IV,2,2476

What hast thou done?

26

IV,2,2483

We are all undone.

27

IV,2,2491

No single soul
Can we set eye on; but in all safe reason...

28

IV,2,2510

I had no mind
To hunt this day: the boy Fidele's sickness...

29

IV,2,2520

I fear 'twill be revenged:
Would, Polydote, thou hadst not done't! though valour...

30

IV,2,2529

Well, 'tis done:
We'll hunt no more to-day, nor seek for danger...

31

IV,2,2540

O thou goddess,
Thou divine Nature, how thyself thou blazon'st...

32

IV,2,2561

My ingenious instrument!
Hark, Polydore, it sounds! But what occasion...

33

IV,2,2565

He went hence even now.

34

IV,2,2572

Look, here he comes,
And brings the dire occasion in his arms...

35

IV,2,2585

O melancholy!
Who ever yet could sound thy bottom? find...

36

IV,2,2635

Great griefs, I see, medicine the less; for Cloten
Is quite forgot. He was a queen's son, boys;...

37

IV,2,2683

Here's a few flowers; but 'bout midnight, more:
The herbs that have on them cold dew o' the night...

38

IV,4,2884

Let us from it.

39

IV,4,2892

Sons,
We'll higher to the mountains; there secure us....

40

IV,4,2909

O, I am known
Of many in the army: many years,...

41

IV,4,2940

No reason I, since of your lives you set
So slight a valuation, should reserve...

42

V,2,3007

Stand, stand! We have the advantage of the ground;
The lane is guarded: nothing routs us but...

43

V,5,3372

I never saw
Such noble fury in so poor a thing;...

44

V,5,3386

Sir,
In Cambria are we born, and gentlemen:...

45

V,5,3513

Is not this boy revived from death?

46

V,5,3518

Peace, peace! see further; he eyes us not; forbear;
Creatures may be alike: were 't he, I am sure...

47

V,5,3522

Be silent; let's see further.

48

V,5,3679

My boys,
There was our error.

49

V,5,3692

[To GUIDERIUS and ARVIRAGUS] Though you did love
this youth, I blame ye not:...

50

V,5,3737

Stay, sir king:
This man is better than the man he slew,...

51

V,5,3751

We will die all three:
But I will prove that two on's are as good...

52

V,5,3758

Have at it then, by leave.
Thou hadst, great king, a subject who...

53

V,5,3763

He it is that hath
Assumed this age; indeed a banish'd man;...

54

V,5,3768

Not too hot:
First pay me for the nursing of thy sons;...

55

V,5,3773

I am too blunt and saucy: here's my knee:
Ere I arise, I will prefer my sons;...

56

V,5,3781

So sure as you your father's. I, old Morgan,
Am that Belarius whom you sometime banish'd:...

57

V,5,3807

Be pleased awhile.
This gentleman, whom I call Polydore,...

58

V,5,3818

This is he;
Who hath upon him still that natural stamp:...

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