Speeches (Lines) for Basset
in "Henry VI, Part I"

Total: 7

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

III,4,1740

Vernon. Now, sir, to you, that were so hot at sea,
Disgracing of these colours that I wear
In honour of my noble Lord of York:
Darest thou maintain the former words thou spakest?

Basset. Yes, sir; as well as you dare patronage
The envious barking of your saucy tongue
Against my lord the Duke of Somerset.


2

III,4,1744

Vernon. Sirrah, thy lord I honour as he is.

Basset. Why, what is he? as good a man as York.


3

III,4,1747

(stage directions). [Strikes him]

Basset. Villain, thou know'st the law of arms is such
That whoso draws a sword, 'tis present death,
Or else this blow should broach thy dearest blood.
But I'll unto his majesty, and crave
I may have liberty to venge this wrong;
When thou shalt see I'll meet thee to thy cost.


4

IV,1,1844

Vernon. Grant me the combat, gracious sovereign.

Basset. And me, my lord, grant me the combat too.


5

IV,1,1851

Vernon. With him, my lord; for he hath done me wrong.

Basset. And I with him; for he hath done me wrong.


6

IV,1,1854

Henry VI. What is that wrong whereof you both complain?
First let me know, and then I'll answer you.

Basset. Crossing the sea from England into France,
This fellow here, with envious carping tongue,
Upbraided me about the rose I wear;
Saying, the sanguine colour of the leaves
Did represent my master's blushing cheeks,
When stubbornly he did repugn the truth
About a certain question in the law
Argued betwixt the Duke of York and him;
With other vile and ignominious terms:
In confutation of which rude reproach
And in defence of my lord's worthiness,
I crave the benefit of law of arms.


7

IV,1,1887

Vernon. Nay, let it rest where it began at first.

Basset. Confirm it so, mine honourable lord.


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