Speeches (Lines) for Bassanio
in "Merchant of Venice"

Total: 73

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,1,70

Good signiors both, when shall we laugh? say, when?
You grow exceeding strange: must it be so?

2

I,1,77

I will not fail you.

3

I,1,121

Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more
than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two...

4

I,1,129

'Tis not unknown to you, Antonio,
How much I have disabled mine estate,...

5

I,1,147

In my school-days, when I had lost one shaft,
I shot his fellow of the self-same flight...

6

I,1,168

In Belmont is a lady richly left;
And she is fair, and, fairer than that word,...

7

I,3,327

Ay, sir, for three months.

8

I,3,329

For the which, as I told you, Antonio shall be bound.

9

I,3,331

May you stead me? will you pleasure me? shall I
know your answer?

10

I,3,334

Your answer to that.

11

I,3,336

Have you heard any imputation to the contrary?

12

I,3,350

Be assured you may.

13

I,3,353

If it please you to dine with us.

14

I,3,361

This is Signior Antonio.

15

I,3,374

Shylock, do you hear?

16

I,3,470

This were kindness.

17

I,3,482

You shall not seal to such a bond for me:
I'll rather dwell in my necessity.

18

I,3,509

I like not fair terms and a villain's mind.

19

II,2,679

You may do so; but let it be so hasted that supper
be ready at the farthest by five of the clock. See...

20

II,2,686

Gramercy! wouldst thou aught with me?

21

II,2,703

One speak for both. What would you?

22

II,2,706

I know thee well; thou hast obtain'd thy suit:
Shylock thy master spoke with me this day,...

23

II,2,714

Thou speak'st it well. Go, father, with thy son.
Take leave of thy old master and inquire...

24

II,2,731

I pray thee, good Leonardo, think on this:
These things being bought and orderly bestow'd,...

25

II,2,741

Gratiano!

26

II,2,743

You have obtain'd it.

27

II,2,745

Why then you must. But hear thee, Gratiano;
Thou art too wild, too rude and bold of voice;...

28

II,2,764

Well, we shall see your bearing.

29

II,2,767

No, that were pity:
I would entreat you rather to put on...

30

III,2,1388

Let me choose
For as I am, I live upon the rack.

31

III,2,1392

None but that ugly treason of mistrust,
Which makes me fear the enjoying of my love:...

32

III,2,1398

Promise me life, and I'll confess the truth.

33

III,2,1400

'Confess' and 'love'
Had been the very sum of my confession:...

34

III,2,1440

So may the outward shows be least themselves:
The world is still deceived with ornament....

35

III,2,1482

What find I here?
[Opening the leaden casket]...

36

III,2,1545

Madam, you have bereft me of all words,
Only my blood speaks to you in my veins;...

37

III,2,1565

With all my heart, so thou canst get a wife.

38

III,2,1581

And do you, Gratiano, mean good faith?

39

III,2,1583

Our feast shall be much honour'd in your marriage.

40

III,2,1591

Lorenzo and Salerio, welcome hither;
If that the youth of my new interest here...

41

III,2,1607

Ere I ope his letter,
I pray you, tell me how my good friend doth.

42

III,2,1626

O sweet Portia,
Here are a few of the unpleasant'st words...

43

III,2,1669

The dearest friend to me, the kindest man,
The best-condition'd and unwearied spirit...

44

III,2,1675

For me three thousand ducats.

45

III,2,1693

[Reads] Sweet Bassanio, my ships have all
miscarried, my creditors grow cruel, my estate is...

46

III,2,1702

Since I have your good leave to go away,
I will make haste: but, till I come again,...

47

IV,1,1995

This is no answer, thou unfeeling man,
To excuse the current of thy cruelty.

48

IV,1,1998

Do all men kill the things they do not love?

49

IV,1,2000

Every offence is not a hate at first.

50

IV,1,2016

For thy three thousand ducats here is six.

51

IV,1,2044

Good cheer, Antonio! What, man, courage yet!
The Jew shall have my flesh, blood, bones and all,...

52

IV,1,2056

Why dost thou whet thy knife so earnestly?

53

IV,1,2150

Yes, here I tender it for him in the court;
Yea, twice the sum: if that will not suffice,...

54

IV,1,2227

Antonio, I am married to a wife
Which is as dear to me as life itself;...

55

IV,1,2267

Here is the money.

56

IV,1,2285

I have it ready for thee; here it is.

57

IV,1,2361

Most worthy gentleman, I and my friend
Have by your wisdom been this day acquitted...

58

IV,1,2374

Dear sir, of force I must attempt you further:
Take some remembrance of us, as a tribute,...

59

IV,1,2385

This ring, good sir, alas, it is a trifle!
I will not shame myself to give you this.

60

IV,1,2389

There's more depends on this than on the value.
The dearest ring in Venice will I give you,...

61

IV,1,2396

Good sir, this ring was given me by my wife;
And when she put it on, she made me vow...

62

IV,1,2408

Go, Gratiano, run and overtake him;
Give him the ring, and bring him, if thou canst,...

63

V,1,2592

We should hold day with the Antipodes,
If you would walk in absence of the sun.

64

V,1,2598

I thank you, madam. Give welcome to my friend.
This is the man, this is Antonio,...

65

V,1,2642

[Aside] Why, I were best to cut my left hand off
And swear I lost the ring defending it.

66

V,1,2652

If I could add a lie unto a fault,
I would deny it; but you see my finger...

67

V,1,2660

Sweet Portia,
If you did know to whom I gave the ring,...

68

V,1,2677

No, by my honour, madam, by my soul,
No woman had it, but a civil doctor,...

69

V,1,2708

Portia, forgive me this enforced wrong;
And, in the hearing of these many friends,...

70

V,1,2716

Nay, but hear me:
Pardon this fault, and by my soul I swear...

71

V,1,2727

By heaven, it is the same I gave the doctor!

72

V,1,2751

Were you the doctor and I knew you not?

73

V,1,2755

Sweet doctor, you shall be my bed-fellow:
When I am absent, then lie with my wife.

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