Speeches (Lines) for Antonio
in "Two Gentlemen of Verona"

Total: 11

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# Act, Scene, Line
(Click to see in context)
Speech text

1

I,3,303

Tell me, Panthino, what sad talk was that
Wherewith my brother held you in the cloister?

2

I,3,306

Why, what of him?

3

I,3,320

Nor need'st thou much importune me to that
Whereon this month I have been hammering.
I have consider'd well his loss of time
And how he cannot be a perfect man,
Not being tried and tutor'd in the world:
Experience is by industry achieved
And perfected by the swift course of time.
Then tell me, whither were I best to send him?

4

I,3,331

I know it well.

5

I,3,337

I like thy counsel; well hast thou advised:
And that thou mayst perceive how well I like it,
The execution of it shall make known.
Even with the speediest expedition
I will dispatch him to the emperor's court.

6

I,3,346

Good company; with them shall Proteus go:
And, in good time! now will we break with him.

7

I,3,355

How now! what letter are you reading there?

8

I,3,359

Lend me the letter; let me see what news.

9

I,3,364

And how stand you affected to his wish?

10

I,3,367

My will is something sorted with his wish.
Muse not that I thus suddenly proceed;
For what I will, I will, and there an end.
I am resolved that thou shalt spend some time
With Valentinus in the emperor's court:
What maintenance he from his friends receives,
Like exhibition thou shalt have from me.
To-morrow be in readiness to go:
Excuse it not, for I am peremptory.

11

I,3,378

Look, what thou want'st shall be sent after thee:
No more of stay! to-morrow thou must go.
Come on, Panthino: you shall be employ'd
To hasten on his expedition.

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